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Raynaud's and Surgery


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#1 Patty1

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 03:03 AM

Hi Folks,
I haven't posted in a while. Been going thru a little bit of a rough spell with health and disability issues. Still waiting for my hearing date with the Admin. Judge. I was also recently diagnosed with Lumbar Spondylolethesis at L5/S1-grade 1-2 (slippage of the vertabrae). MRI showed quite the deformity. After 2 injections, and 2 months of physical therapy, and still no pain relief, I am scheduled for surgery (2) at the end of this month and the beginning of next month. I am scared wittless, needless to say. The surgeon tells me the procedure he is doing, anterior/posterior lumbar interbody fusion, (with decompression and laminectomy) is usually done as one surgery, a lengthy one from what I have read. He has choosen to split the surgery into two separate surgeries, a week appart.The reason he gave me is concern about my severe raynauds. He said something about getting 4 or 5 hours into the surgery and having problems from the raynauds. I was so stunned I froze (LOL, no pun intended!) I couldn't think to ask the obvious questions.I told the doctor I have Raynaud's in my feet and knesss as well, he said I have it all over. Has anyone else had problems with Raynaud's and surgery? What could possibly happen? Any insight would help ALOT.
Thanks,
Patty

#2 Jeannie McClelland

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 03:22 AM

Hi Patty,

When I've had to have surgery, they've always put those boots with pumps in them on my feet, wrapped everything they can in warmed blankets, and used a device called a Baer Hugger. It sits over a part of your body and blows heated air on you. (I wanted one to take home!). They also warmed the bags if saline solution they had running. I'm not sure what your surgeon will do, but it sure sounds like he is on the ball, splitting the surgery into halves.

Best of luck with the surgeries - I'm sure you'll enjoy being out of pain!
Jeannie McClelland
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#3 Patty1

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 07:20 AM

Thanks Jeanne,I am so looking forward to at least a reduction of the pain..Doc tells me not to expect to be pain free, the best outcome would be if they could cut the pain in half. I will be happy to at least be able to bend when I make the bed, and not grind my teeth to stop from groaning too loud! If the Baer Hugger is good as it sounds, I want one. When they did my neck surgery a few years ago, I vaguely remember them wrapping me up in warm blankets. The operating room was so cold, I started turning blue before they knocked me out. I don't remember getting a Baer Hugger then, but who knows!
A Vascular Surgeon is also going to be performing part of the surgery, (which is common for the anterior part) to move all the major blood vessels. I am worried about that part of the surgery, I wonder if that is where I could have a complication of spasms?
Patty

#4 Sheryl

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 09:05 AM

Patty,
After the last two surgeries that I have had my doctors put these things on my legs that pump and keep the circulation moving. The nurses wrap me up with real warm blankets before and during the surgery if needed or I start to feel cold. I don't know if they have any pump type things for your arms but, you could ask. Maybe just the ones for the lower extremities will be enough to keep blood moving about and keep you from having Raynaud's attacks. Good luck with your surgery and let us know how you are doing afterwards.
Strength and Warmth,
Sheryl

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#5 enjoytheride

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 04:05 PM

Ah- warm blankets pre-surgery. Closest I'll ever get to a spa.
Anyway- good luck with your surgery. I hope it gives the results you need.