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Maybe a dumb question on Raynaud's


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#1 Jeannie McClelland

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 05:18 PM

OK, this is probably a dumb question, but does a prolonged period of very hot weather make the 'threshold' of what will set off a Raynaud's attack higher? It's been very, very hot here for quite a while and this week has been getting close to 100F/38C every day. It's cooled off tonight to the mid-70'sF/mid-20'sC and my fingers are white. (Not sure about the toes, can't see them for socks!)

Has anyone else noticed this sort of thing?

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#2 jefa

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 05:26 PM

Yes, I have. Not sure if that is the exact mechanism, but it sounds like plausible reasoning. It's like the relative change is important. My worst attack ever was in mid-July a couple of years ago - it was quite hot, but windy and I went outside to pick up the wheeled trash bin the wind was tossing around. The wind across my skin triggered the attack.
Warm wishes,
Jefa

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#3 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 05:43 PM

Hi Jeannie,

That's not a dumb question at all! In fact, don't they say there is no such thing as a dumb question, only people who are too dumb to ask questions? I'm sorry you are having increasing attacks, even in such hot weather and send even more WARM hugs to you.

Yes, changing weather can cause Raynaud's, due to disruption of acclimation. My Raynaud's is often worse in the summer due to lack of acclimation to the air conditioning settings in many public places. I may be okay with the heat (to an extent) and fine with the gentle air conditioning in our house, but suffer with exposure to colder air conditioning -- even at temperatures that I might find acceptable in the winter.

We have a new section on the main site about this, Acclimation Can Prevent Raynaud's, which features a recent New York Times article with Dr. Frederick Wigley.

The good news is, we can use this acclimation information to help reduce attacks of Raynaud's, provided of course that we use reasonable approaches. I like the idea of hands in warm water while the rest of the place is cold.
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
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#4 Sandy B

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 10:32 PM

Hi Jeannie,

No it is not a dumb question. I too suffer from severe Raynauds attacks during the height of the British summer (well I guess that says it all!). But seriously, if we have had a few days of warm weather and the temperature suddenly dips by about five degrees, my hands think it is winter and turn white. I have been known to where gloves on a late summers evening and toast my fingers over the BBQ, which is dumb I know!

Take care

Sandy B

#5 judyt

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 10:50 PM

Hi Jeannie and others,
That's really interesting about Raynauds in hot weather. I used to find that New Year's Day (summer here) was a day when I could almost guarantee having white hands and feet. Because we are always on holiday at that time of year, we would often be out boating and walking on beaches and I got fed up with the "cold" wind which would often be blowing.

One year I remember walking along our beach to the next beach which had no land access so we would go over rocks and sand and through pools of warm water at low tide. By the time we got there that day I looked down and my feet were white and bleeding!!!! My feet were so cold that my shoes, jandals, flip flops, thongs whatever you like to call them had rubbed through the tops of my feet and I could feel nothing.

It has always been a puzzle to me how that could happen in such warm weather so it is interesting to read what you have to say about it.

As I have said before recently, I haven't had a Raynauds attack for months (it is mid winter now) because I have been on 240mg of diltiazem to control the uneven heart beat I had been experiencing.
I have been fortunate in that the meds. I have been offered have been brilliant in controlling the Raynauds.

Hope you manage to get through the summer without too many dramas.
Best wishes from Downunder.

Judyt

#6 Joelf

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 04:58 AM

Hi All

Now this is a very interesting thread because I too have had several bad bouts of Raynaud's during the summer months. In the UK, for a change, we have actually had a half decent summer this year and I would have expected the white, painful fingers to have been much better, but I have still had the problem. One of the worst times is in the supermarket due to the air conditioning; I don't really like to wear gloves, especially picking out the fruit and vegetables and by the time I get to the checkout I can hardly feel my fingers at all and find it hard to get out my purse etc. to pay for my groceries!! :unsure:

Another rather bizarre thing I've found with Raynaud's is that it always seems to be bad when I've just eaten my breakfast??!! :blink: I wondered if it might be because my blood supply is being primarily diverted to my digestion and allowing the extremities (fingers ) to get cold? Does anyone else find the same or is it me being a little peculiar? (more so than normal, that is!!! ;) :lol: )

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#7 Lynnie

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 08:09 AM

Hi Jeannie and everyone

Me too! I'm fine during the day like Jo and Sandy.

England has had some lovely warm, hot days but as soon as the temperature starts to cool on an evening I start to go funny colours! As barbecues are usually on an evening I am usually found around the chiminea! Supermarkets are a nightmare,
the air-conditioning during the warm weather hurts me. Going from the heat outdoors to the cool inside "whites" me out!.

Jo my time is after lunch, I only have a sandwich, a yogurt and a cup of tea and my hands puff up, they don't go completely white but up to my first knuckle I do "shut down" for about an hour!

Hope your all doing OK
Love to all
Lynn xx :emoticon-hug:

#8 lizzie

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 10:40 AM

Hi Jeannie, I think there is something in your theory. My Raynauds is as bad in summer as it is in winter - it seems not to be the actual temperature that sets it off , but a change in temperature.
Lizzie

#9 Buttons

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 04:47 AM

Hi Jeannie

I agree with what has been said. I also find that it seems to be those few degrees of temperature change which sets off an attack of white finger! My rheumatologist suggested that I might be able to take half the medication I normally take but I'm still taking the full amount because if I don't they become wonderful & multicoloured & are just as painful as the winter months.


Buttons

#10 Snowbird

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 08:36 AM

Yup, works for me too! All I have to do is wash my hands...and if it is hot/warm/cool, no matter what the temperature...I still turn white. Some days I think all you have to do is blow on me when you walk by LOL.
Sending good wishes your way!

#11 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 09:32 AM

Okay, now everybody raise your red/white/blue hands if you have ever encountered the automatic sinks that are set to distribute the next best thing to ice. And then how do you manage getting away without an attack of Raynaud's?

Raising my hand: :bye:
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
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#12 Snowbird

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 01:19 PM

No such thing as getting away from those :lol:

Raising my hand too: :bye:
Sending good wishes your way!

#13 Jeannie McClelland

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 03:02 PM

Those are the same sinks that cover you in pink goop masquerading as soap, right? The ones where you have to keep one hand waving at the sensor whilst trying to single-handedly get rid of the goop. Then you have to drip your way over to a blower that immediately tries to finish the quick freeze job. Yep, I know those. They are the ones in the restrooms that have the frost on the door handles and a strange white mist seeping out around the door. It's my understanding they are standard in hospitals and were designed by the same firm that does the stirrups on examining tables. :huh:
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#14 bookworm

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 07:56 PM

I try to remember to carry my own wet wipes or sanitizing jel or liquid. Then you don't become the victim of strange sinks and blow-dry systems.

Mary in Texas

#15 Jeannie McClelland

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 04:07 AM

Hi Mary,

After Carrie told me once about a packing system called something like purse pockets, I made a couple of pouches that I can move from bag to bag. It's kind of a grown-up diaper bag with tissues, wet wipes, and small bottles of lotion and sanitizing gel, and a little pump spray bottle of disinfectant (for toilet stall handles, etc.). I found all the tiny bottles in the drugstore in packs for travelers.

Best wishes,
Jeannie McClelland
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#16 bookworm

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 08:54 AM

Great idea, Jeannie! It also sounds like fun shopping for the little containers!

Mary in Texas

#17 Lillskuzi

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 09:49 AM

Hi!

I think it is the temperature change which sets it off. I too still get Raynauds in the summer and I don't go anywhere without a pair of gloves in my bag, in case I walk round a corner from being in the sun to the shade and get cold hands!

I too also get cold right after eating. I also wondered if it is because the blood has been diverted to the stomach!
Glad it's not just me! :fairy:
Susie

#18 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 06:17 AM

Hi Jeannie,

That sounds neat, the purse pockets that Carrie suggested! I think I might make one of those, it could come in really handy. And thanks to everyone for these neat tips!
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
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#19 betty32506

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 06:40 AM

<My rheumatologist suggested that I might be able to take half the medication I normally take>

Buttons,

Sorry to jump in like this but I would like to know what meds you take for it.

Thanks.

Betty

#20 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 03 August 2010 - 05:11 AM

Betty, I see we haven't answered your question yet about treatments for Raynaud's.

So let's toss it out to the forum. Do you use only preventive measures to deal with Raynaud's, or do you also use medications? If so, what medication(s) and what is your experience with them?

As for me, I used to take some medication for Raynaud's, which was also a blood pressure medication, but it didn't help all that much, and for years now I have been able to enjoy fairly good success by relying on Raynaud's Prevention techniques.
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
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