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10 Medication Mistakes to Avoid


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#1 janey

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 10:46 AM

10 Medication Mistakes to Avoid.

These 10 guidelines will help you to take your medication the right way. Are you making any of these mistakes? Instant Health Answers. Shine (Yahoo). 07/19/10. (Also see: Medications)

This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
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#2 Sweet

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 03:12 AM

Great article Janey thanks. I got caught on one of those! Hmmm
Warm and gentle hugs,

Pamela
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#3 janey

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 03:30 PM

As of last week, I have to add another one. I take Bosentan which is considered a "specialty" medication. My pharmacy got switched due to a switch in insurance. The new pharmacist, after reviewing my list of medication, told me not to take Bosentan and most prescription drugs within an hour of taking iron. She said that some medications bind with iron, lessening their effect. This was not in the Bosentan information sheet, so I found it quite interesting. Just emphasizing the fact that your pharmacist should always know ALL of the medications you take and that includes supplements.
Janey Willis
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#4 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 11:34 PM

I'm chiming in here as well. Janey's point about pharmacists knowing all our medications and supplements is very important. I think pharmacists are one of the most unsung heroes of the entire medical system, and an under-utilized resource, as well.

One tip I have is to never shy away from consulting a pharmacist -- their advice is FREE and they know more about medications and interactions than you can even imagine. I make them my first call whenever we have medication questions in our family, or if we think a symptom might be a side effect, and so on. I find it helps to think of a pharmacist as part of our medical team, and a good pharmacist can be worth their weight in gold, even advising of cheaper or better alternatives, if asked.

When possible, we try to consolidate all our medications with one pharmacy. Then we get to know our pharmacist(s) by name. We ask them when the least busy time typically is for them, so that we know an optimum time to call with any medication questions. We take the initiative to call them at least once a year or with any major medication change to review all our medications and supplements to see if there are any interactions, special instructions (like the input Janey received on iron), or duplications (like, do we really need two medications with a strong diuretic side effect or could our doctor modify our treatment?)
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#5 Jeannie McClelland

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 02:13 AM

My oldest daughter is a pharmacist and I thought she'd enjoy this thread so I called and read it to her. Her reply? "You better believe it, Baby!" Not only is their training rigorous, but to maintain their license, they have to take a certain number of CME's (continuing medical education credits) every year.

I've done the same thing Shelley does. With the exception of the medication that must come from a specialist pharmacy, everything else is in one place. I know the pharmacists by name too.

Pharmacists care about their customers, especially the ones they know. It hit home one day when I went to pick up some refills and the pharmacist was chatting with another woman and looked upset. It turned out the woman was the daughter of a long-term customer and had been telling her that her mother was coming to the end of her life. With that sort of commitment and engagement, you know that a pharmacist will definitely be on the look-out for interaction problems and give good advice about side effects and possible reactions. They'll call you right away too if a medication is withdrawn from the market for safety reasons (happened to me twice).

One BOLO (be on the lookout) I can add is about taking certain medications (especially those which are to be taken on an empty stomach) with antacids or any supplements that contain calcium. They can really hinder absorption of the medication.

Warm wishes,
Jeannie McClelland
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#6 janey

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 02:23 AM

Jeannie,
Yep - I was told not to take my cellcept within an hour of my PPI or any antiacid. Another biggy. I know the PPI doesn't contain calcium, so it must be something else in the PPI that hinders the absorption of certain medication. Therefore, I usually take the PPI alone first thing in the am and then before dinner at night.
Janey Willis
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International Scleroderma Network (ISN)