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Scleroderma and Vitamin E


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#1 Annie20

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 01:40 PM

Is there any connection with scleroderma and Vitamin E allergies? :thank-you: for your help.

Annie
Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis, (Scleroderma). Lung, skin and gastrointestinal involvement.

#2 Jeannie McClelland

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 04:03 PM

Hi Annie,

We have a section on the main ISN site on Causes of Scleroderma and it doesn't list Vitamin E allergy as a suspected cause, nor could I find any any studies (reliable or not) suggesting any association between Vit. E allergy and scleroderma. Vitamin E occurs naturally in a lot of foods: vegetable oils and shortening, meat, eggs, milk, and leafy vegetables. If you'd like to read more about it, this link will take you to a National Institute of Health Fact Sheet.

Best wishes,


Jeannie McClelland
(Retired) ISN Director of Support Services
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International Scleroderma Network

#3 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 04:18 AM

Hi Annie,

I suppose we should hit the Pause button for a minute, and define what you mean by "Vitamin E Allergy". I may be wrong (I often am!) but I've never heard of anyone allergic to the Vitamin E that is found naturally in foods, because "it's everywhere, it's everywhere!". :blink: So, let's rule naturally occurring Vitamin E out of this equation for the sake of argument, okay?

Then, I'd guess we'd narrow this down to a reaction to either a Vitamin E ointment or pill, both of which are rather easy to avoid by simply not taking them. In particular, the pills can contain a lot of other allergic things, like perhaps a soy oil or other fillers, and either natural or synthetic Vitamin E. So, taking this assumption (and we all know what "assuming" means) one step further, then I think the odds are very good that you might be talking in terms of one or just a few allergic reactions before you figured out what was causing it, and eliminated it from your regimen.

Then the question would become, can a few allergic responses of any kind trigger scleroderma? I'm not a doctor or a medical researcher, but my best guess would be probably not, because kazillions of people have allergic reactions every day, without developing scleroderma. Perhaps a long-term allergic exposure might be another issue since it would be repeatedly triggering the immune system and causing inflammation, along the lines of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity.

But, let's take that a merry step further down Assumption Lane. Could you sue the makers of Vitamin E ointment or pills for causing scleroderma? Absolutely not, because there is no correlation, that I have heard of (and everyone, correct me if I am wrong, please!) with Vitamin E or Vitamin E allergy as an official cause of scleroderma, plus there is some evidence that Vitamin E in various forms may even be helpful for certain types of scleroderma and symptoms.

So, if you have scleroderma, you might want to take a gander at our Causes of Scleroderma section, where you'll likely find oodles of potential culprits that you've been exposed to at one time or another. You'll see, rather quickly, that it is largely a moot issue as to the cause, unless there is a very clear and undeniable occupational exposure to a known trigger of scleroderma.

I'm sorry it's not easier than that to answer. I know what it's like to always be left wondering exactly what caused it, largely in hopes of avoiding doing any more of it!
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
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International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#4 Annie20

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 12:44 PM

Thank you Jeannie and Shelley for your responses. :thank-you:

Annie
Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis, (Scleroderma). Lung, skin and gastrointestinal involvement.