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battery heated gloves


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#1 Caroline F

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 08:40 AM

Hi there :D

Well the weather's getting colder and as usual I am dreading the winter because my Raynaud's seems to be worsening progressively each year. Also, I think this Winter in particular because I was diagnosed early this year with limited scleroderma.

I have a million pairs of different gloves, none of which stop my fingers going dead. I tried the silver astronaut gloves last year and they didn't work either, so this year I am considering the battery operated heated ones. From the research I've done so far, rechargeable battery packs with gloves that have heat going into the fingers seem to be the best option. However, before I spend a significant amount of money on some gloves with the hope that they will prove to be my best ever buy, I wonder if I could ask my fellow sufferers for any recommendations, or are you not allowed to recommend specific makes? It's just I'd hate to spend a load of money only to find out I could have got something better or cheaper.

Warm wishes to you all,

Caroline

#2 SaraM

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 01:55 PM

Caroline,

You and I are quite alike!! I have Raynaud's and limited scleroderma. My winter routine has been to wear a pair of the little cotton gloves ALL the time, whenever I am outside. I then take two of the little hand warmers you get in the packets and put them in the tops of my heavy-duty mittens. I have not tried battery operated gloves yet, but I looked at some websites. If you search for "battery operated hunting gloves" you can find some pairs as low as $20. I am planning on buying myself a pair to try out this winter. I may go with mittens instead of fingered gloves just because they are supposed to be better for circulation. I hope this information helps! I will let you know if I find out any more details.

Warm Hugs,

Sara

#3 jillatk

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 02:39 PM

Caroline,

I also have all manner of gloves and still can't stay warm consistently. I have a pair of motorcycle gloves that plug in and noticed a difference between the ones that just heat the palms and back of the hand and those that have wires that thread through the fingers, with the latter being much warmer. I have also started to consider battery operated socks as I am having an awful time keeping my toes warm in the cooler weather.

I try and keep my core warm just on the general principle that a warmer core keeps warm blood flowing.

Good luck and let us know if it works for you.

Jill

#4 Vanessa

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 11:03 PM

The very best option I have found is a handwarmer which you put lighter fuel in and it stays warm all day. I have 2 and take them both out with me always.

I think they were designed for fishermen, hunters etc. and I bang on about them to all Sclerodermians I meet.

They are much better than the ones you put in the microwave in that you can keep them running all day.

I ordered mine off the internet but the problem is I think we are supposed to avoid most brand names on the forum. May I say that they are made by a well known lighter manufacturer whose name begins with Z---- and swear, scouts honour, that I do not have shares in the company. You may send me a PM (just click on the envelope icon at the left of my forum message) for the brand name, if you want it.

Anyway wrap up well,

Vanessa

#5 Buttons

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 12:52 AM

Hi Caroline, I suffer with Raynaud's and Limited Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) and purchased some battery operated heated gloves but I found them far to clumsy so couldn't do much while wearing them. I now wear cashmere gloves with a pair of Sheepskin mittens over the top and carry heatpacks in my pockets which last most of the day. I wear down jackets in the winter and was told by my general practitioner that they do make down mittens but have still not managed to find those yet but would definitely like to have a pair. I do find that pure wool, sheepskin etc are much better than man made fabrics.

Buttons

#6 enjoytheride

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 03:13 AM

Vanessa- your post is soooo funny. If those hints were any heavier, they would punch holes in the computer. :)
I used to see those sold in hunting or horse back riding catalogs.

#7 Caroline F

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 06:49 AM

That's exactly it Sara, thin gloves, heat pads with bulkier gloves over the top, but my fingers still go dead and what a palava trying to get those pesky 5ps out your purse!! So something else is definately called for. although I think I am doomed in trying to find a non-bulky solution. Vanessa I will look into your suggestion and have sussed out the manufacturer, thank you. The natural fibres makes sense, Buttons, thank you, as all my gloves have been man made (and pretty useless) so in desperation I finally gave in to leather and tried some goat skin gloves which are loads better I have to admit. I'll keep an eye out for down ones too. Thanks everyone. I'll let you know if I go down the battery operated route.

#8 Annie20

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 12:52 PM

Caroline F,

Thank you for inquiring about the battery operated gloves. Perhaps, I too would be interested in purchasintg a pair this winter. I am sorry I'm not able to help you, but am happy that Buttons, Vanessa, Jill and Sara were able to. On today's chat it was very nice to meet you and I hope you will join us in future chats. :) Take care.

Annie
Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis, (Scleroderma). Lung, skin and gastrointestinal involvement.

#9 Lil Dee

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 09:19 PM

I have found mittens are soooo much warmer than 'gloves', and now use large mittens, with the throw-away charcoal based hand warmers (they are enviro friendly !!) that I get from a local supermarket....that cost so much less than other companies (Mods - Is that too obvious !? Sorry if it is...) as I buy in bulk.

I hear that one of the best natural fibres is Possom - New Zealand are currently over-run with this particular little creature. It was unfortunatly introduced to their country, and is now causing great concern due to it out-performing the indigenous animals. So, Possom fur is quite popular with them at the moment ! I personally can't comment, but if anyone has any experience ?!

Keep watm ladies.....winters a-coming here in NW England. *Brrrrrrrr*

#10 Snowbird

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 09:41 AM

I have also found mittens to be better and warmer (never thought I would ever wear them actually because I have always preferred gloves)....until Ray decided to attack me too! I've been on mittens and heat warmers ever since...but I sure like the sound of down filled mittens, they sure sound like they would be worth a try.
Sending good wishes your way!

#11 froggy

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 11:07 AM

I don't know where I heard this (sometimes I wonder if I dream this stuff and think that it's reality... scary huh?) Anyway, regardless of where it came from, it really does hold true. They say that if you keep your ankles and wrists warm, your feet and hands will stay warm. I guess it's as if the source is what matters?? At any rate, for me, the Raynaud's did not get severe until last year, and even then, it was not near as bad as it's been these past several months. Point being, what I did to keep my hands and feet warm last winter, worked really well, but I do not know if the same techniques will work again this year being that the Raynaud's is the worst it's ever been.

All of that said, the weather here in Grey Pittsburgh, PA has been damp and very cold as of late. If I make certain that my wrists and ankles are kept extra warm, I can maintain heat in my hands for the majority of the day (I do wear gloves, but not battery operated or heated in any way.) I just make sure that I have thick socks on that go way past my ankles, and sweaters, or thick cotton shirts/hoodies that go past my wrists and rest on my hands. I've thought about buying those cheesy '80's terry cloth wrist bands... bet they'd work like a charm.=) I still have no idea what to do for my poor nose...

Hope that helps. Peace blessings,

~Andrea

#12 jillatk

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 03:50 PM

Yeah, the nose business stinks. I have tried all manner of balaclavas and have not had great luck keeping my poor nose warm. So far the best thing has been pulling my neck gaiter up around my face. The other thing that really helps me when my hands get cold is to hold hands with someone with warm hands. Certainly stimulates interesting conversations to ask someone to hold my hands!

Jill

#13 mando621

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 01:18 AM

Hi,

I don't have it that bad with Raynaud's, but I knit a pair of wristlets in wool sock yarn and I wore them during a class in an air conditioned building this summer. They were just the thing I needed to keep my wrist and hand warm, and since I needed to be able to type it was great that my fingers were uncovered. I'm not sure these would work alone, but maybe under mittens or a loose glove a wristlet would be helpful. There are patterns all over the internet if you are a crafter, or you can look into getting them online. They are considered fashionable by the younger crowd so I think you could find them in many places. I would get wool since the natural fiber is good at keeping things warm even if damp.

I had other people in the class looking enviously at me when I was in my cashmere sweater and wristlets and they were in summer attire and freezing. Sometimes I've got worse problems in the summer when they think that the air conditioning should keep the building at a "winter" temperature. I was wearing 3 layers, long pants, socks and lace up shoes, and the wristlets, and still had a chill now and then. Of course I had to un-layer when it came time to go home on my bike. I seem to always be prepared with many layers everywhere I go. I had to take 3 sweaters home from work yesterday because I'd left them in my office. It has been chilly in the morning and beautiful in the afternoon. The heat hasn't been turned on at work, so I brought my portable. I also took my wristlets in so I'll be prepared. Last year I stocked up on the charcoal heat packs and I have enough for a month or two for this winter. It is great when hunting season starts here, you can stock up on all that kind of stuff without looking weird.

Mando.

#14 acksd

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 12:48 PM

Getting back to the OPs question, I have some battery operated gloves and they work pretty well. The batteries last about three to four hours on mine if turned all the way up. The problem with gloves or mittens are that they are made to keep heat in and once your hands and fingers spasm there is no heat and my fingers are not going to warm up without external heating. The battery powered gloves provide this for me. I wear one of my many pairs of regular gloves for work and when my hands get cold I break out the electric gloves to rewarm them. When I snowboard I wear mittens with two toe warmers in each mitten. I found the toe warmers to generate more heat than the hand warmers and they have sticky stuff on one side so they stay put on the outside of the inner liner. I stick one on the back of my hand and the other on the palm side but down by my fingers.

#15 judyt

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 09:33 PM

Hi,

Lil Dee is talking about Possum fur. Nobody has replied so perhaps I had better add my two penny worth of experience. I have to say I have never tried Possum gloves, I have some rabbit fur lined ones to use when I need them. But I do wear possum sweaters. Well, not exactly 100% possum like fur gloves would be. We here in NZ have a number of manufacturers who make garments from a mixture of possum, merino, silk, cashmere, nylon - any number of different combinations. One I really like wearing is 65% ultrafine merino; 25% possum; 10% silk. Another one is something like 10% nylon; 25% possum; 25% lambswool and the rest angora. Merino is marvelous, it is machine washable and comes as fine as cotton or as chunky as can be. Possum is fluffy like Angora but oh so cozy.

Just like the rest of you I wear layers and in winter you will find me in minimum of 3 layers of merino on top, merino leggings, then polar fleece or wool trousers and a sweater of one of the above mixtures or else a chunky merino.

There are lots of online sites where you can order New Zealand possum products and the more we sell the better because they are a real pest in the forest, not to mention in the garden - they just love rose buds!!!! They climb to the tops of the trees and feast on the new growth. I guess you have lots of pests in the US too and some of them more dangerous than the possum but our problem is that our conditions are ideal for them and they breed like flies.

We are just coming out of winter here now but I still have 2 layers on today, 2 tops and 2 bottoms!!

Warm hugs from NZ,

Judyt