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ISN New Topic: Scleroderma and Tattoos


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26 replies to this topic

#21 zomby

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 12:28 PM

I understand what you are saying trying to reproduce the meaning of the tattoo in other ways but the main point to my post was that, it felt that, the majority or comments held the undertones that tattoos were bad: period. And when I mentioned religious tattoos I meant more like the Maori people who use facial tattoos everyday in their social constructions to know where they belonged to and what they done, etc. And some people as I said, take this as a lifestyle, it's not just going and getting a tattoo because it means something; I have three tattoos and only one of them have any specific meaning and representation; some people just enjoy the art form and being a walking canvas. You can try your hardest to reproduce the feeling of getting a significant tattoo but you'll never be able to, the intimate art form is something quite irreplaceable you can't duplicate that if it's already been so enveloped in your life. My post was not disputing any information or opinions before me, it was just good information for those like me on this site who have accepted the lifestyle and passion for tattoos. And that is something that has always sickened me regarding American laws on body modification; it's far too lenient regarding just who opens a shop for such things. Here in the UK it's very strict. I do apologize if any of my posts here offend someone at all. I am only here to offer another side of the coin as I said. I am going to my local tattoo artist on Thursday to discuss inks and such with him, I will post any other information he gives me for those of you reading who like me wish to continue getting inked. Please remember to check with your specialist and local time served license tattoo artist prior.

Oh and if all goes well my next tattoo is going to be a sinking pirate ship on my calf. :)

#22 zomby

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 12:57 PM

Oh and regarding how they feel about it in 10-20 years later, if they have remorse about getting it they obviously didn't take enough time to think it through; if you decide to get a tattoo and one of the things you're worried about is the future and how you'll like it, then don't get it. And the argument "how will it look when you're 60" is easily answered by "please remind me how good you'll look when you're 60", everyone ages differently.  No one will be perfectly smooth unblotched and prestine when they are old. Sorry for the many replies I have to use my phone and it's not the best for keeping up conversation in forums.



#23 Joelf

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 01:12 PM

Hi Zomby,

 

Alas, I'm 60 and not perfectly smooth, unblotched and prestine -- I wish!! ;) :lol:

 

Perhaps I should get a tattoo; I feel that midlife crisis bearing down on me after all!!  :P :D


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#24 zomby

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 04:49 PM

Hi Zomby,

Alas, I'm 60 and not perfectly smooth, unblotched and prestine -- I wish!! ;) :lol:

Perhaps I should get a tattoo; I feel that midlife crisis bearing down on me after all!! :P :D

 

 

This would quite possibly be the worst time for you or anyone to get a tattoo haha, buy a sexy car, or hire a sexy gardener for the mid life crisis haha  :lol:



#25 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 11:17 AM

I would love to have my eyebrows tattooed so I would not be chained to my eyebrow make up and pencil! :lol:  :lol: I am, however, afraid that I will cause the morphea to appear on my face or even worse bullous morphea!

 

I had a friend, when at work, who had her lip line tattooed and it unfortunately looked like she'd put her lippy on whilst drunk! It was awful and she was stuck with it, It was uneven and way, way above the natural line of her lips.

 

If I do ever have it done I'll post a picture but don't hold your breath.

 

Take care.


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#26 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:00 AM

Hi Amanda,

 

Mother nature has also mostly abandoned my eyebrows and I would like nothing better than a makeup tattoo to solve the issue permanently. And I think it would be a tremendous advantage to have my lip line increased and enhanced. Well, if neither were done wonky, that is.

 

Unfortunately, they will have to remain my pipe dreams because I am one of those unsuitable candidates. So I've adapted by setting up a makeup table, so that I can at least sit down comfortably and ergonomically while doing my hair and makeup.

 

The beauty of no eyebrow tattoo though is that my eyebrows look different every day!  It's fun to just draw a line straight across the forehead for the trendy uni-brow look. 

 

Actually, given an audience medicated into a stupor, I could probably do a two-hour comedy routine on the subject of eyebrow designs, makeup, and the entertaining yet embarrassing hazards of melting eyebrows.

 

:emoticons-group-hug:


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#27 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 12:52 PM

Oh, Shelley, they are different everyday, well that's okay the problem is when the left and the right eyebrow look like they belong to different days! I know that no one person has identical eyebrows but for the average person their eyebrows at least look like they belong to the same face! As for myself, naturally each eyebrow looks totally different which makes enhancing them a tricky process, if I am not careful I exaggerate the difference between each brow and well it's not a good look.

 

Pathetically I find myself with eyebrow envy and when I look at famous women I am always drawn to their eyebrows, my husband looks bemused when I comment on what lovely eyebrows such and such has. At work my friend and I would talk along these lines and agreed that Elizabeth Taylor had the most amazing brows ever, second for me is Rachel Weisz.

 

Take care.


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