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Trouble with Blood Tests


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#1 Jaggers

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 07:18 AM

Hi all,

Not looking forward to tomorrow, have my monthly blood tests to do and since the 18th of February I have had both gastro and vomiting. I had thought it had stopped after day 5 but it came back within a day.

Before I had blood clots form around my port and under my left arm. The bloods were done before the chemo started, since then the blood tests are done down on ground floor of the hospital the week before chemo. But they don't/ can't access the port so they look for a vein in my chest as no one can find a vein in my arms. Not being able to be hydrated makes it all that much harder and the skin is highly sensitive.

The ladies in pathology are lovely and never want to push to get the blood, but it's got to be done. Bright side is this time around chemo is only for a year hopefully. The last one was for 22 months, I also see my rheumatologist tomorrow for a check up and injections into my shoulder joints plus have to tell her about the toes going black! This has never happened before well.

Well that's my sook for the day



#2 Robyn Sims

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 07:26 AM

Hi Jaggers

As you can see I have put your last post as a new topic about trouble when having blood tests.

I have heard that warming the area where blood is to be taken with a wheaty bag can help. I see you realise that hydration is really important, but as you have been vomiting I expect this is a real problem.

Maybe others have some ideas.

In the meantime I hope all goes well and that they day is better than expected. :emoticons-group-hug:


Kind regards



#3 Robyn Sims

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 04:34 AM

That's great Jaggers

Glad to hear the day went well.

:emoticons-group-hug:



#4 uknlv18

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 09:15 AM

I'm glad to hear that the blood came out fine, I have trouble with them being able to find veins, I always have. I look like a pin cushion when I am done, and when they dig around trying to find a vein that is the worst! I was told by a nurse that they call that going fishing, so I told her to act like she lost her bait and take the line out and try again without the fishing part hehe. :emoticon-dont-know:

Here's hoping that things start staying in your system and the symptoms alleviate for you! And many hugs and a few of my spoons to help you along!

:emoticons-group-hug:

:spoon: :spoon:

Cheers
Jean

#5 bendofislands

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 08:46 PM

The wonderful thing about these Forums is that you read about something and think "I am not the only one that happens to". I thought it was only me who had problems with having blood taken. Now I see it is common for those of us with Scleroderma. What a relief. No one told me for more than 20 years you need to drink a lot to hydrate yourself. I have had to learn a technique to disassociate from what is happening. This helps, but only if they can get the needle in first time. The problem with this is that even if I tell them this is what I am doing and please not to speak to me till it is done, they think I have feinted and try to get my attention.

The sicker I am, the more they want to do blood tests, and the more impossible it is to get blood. In the early days of illness I had them come to my home and I used a hotwater bottle on the arm and this really helped me. In Australia the biggest problem is blasting air conditioning units that send my body into Raynard's straight away. I have learnt to choose where I have the blood tests done where the most skilled workers are. I don't hesitate to say 'this is not going to work today I will come back another day'. No one gets a second chance as I know my veins close down and no one will get blood out.

In the United Kingdom you can't choose where you go, it is the hospital blood taking unit and you wait and wait and wait, and some of the people seem to be lacking much knowledge of what they are doing. Am I alone in thinking until recently that the people who took blood were trained nurses? After my episode in United Kingdom I looked it up on internet and found all they need to do is a TAFE level course. I think it is the same in Australia. Is this so?

#6 Robyn Sims

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 04:05 AM

Hi again,

I see you have been having a good read of some of these posts.

To be a Phlebotomist, that is a person who takes blood samples etc., in Australia you need to only do a course, and no, they are not qualified nurses, but qualified phlebotomists.

Over the past few years I have spoken with many people who have terrible trouble with these tests. Unfortunately with scleroderma it is not only the skin but veins that cause great difficulty in getting a good sized sample. All the things you have mentioned, ie, hot water bottle, drinking plenty of water before hand, and meditation are wonderful hints for others.

So thanks again for posting and again Welcome to sub forum Australia.

:emoticons-group-hug:

#7 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 03:35 PM

Hello Bendofislands

Phlebotomists only take blood and should therefore become expert at it and perhaps better at it than nurses who also do many other things. I have had cannula's put in by both and doctors and the phlebotomists were best at it.

Take care.
Amanda Thorpe
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#8 Robyn Sims

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 04:07 PM

Hi,

I agree Amanda.

When in emergency with my daughter they decided they needed to do a blood test. The young nurse (who happened to be the great grandaughter of Florence Nightingale - true) was unable to get the vein after a couple of tries, became quite agitated and called in the doctor, who was unsuccessful as well.

It was like a circus, but not funny. They gave up in the end. When having blood tests there is never any trouble at her favourite pathology clinic.

A positive take on the situation.

:emoticons-group-hug:

#9 lizzie

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 04:38 PM

Hi Robyn,
I think that young nurse may have been spinning you a line :VeryHappy: - biographies say that Florence Nightingale never married and never had any children!

Lizzie

#10 Robyn Sims

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 05:39 PM

Um, well, it was her surname and that is why the topic was bought up.

Perhaps Florence had a brother and she is related this way. She did say she was the only member of the family who went into nursing.

I take everyone at face value Lizzie. Let me dream on that she actually was a relative!!!

Cheers
:emoticons-group-hug:

#11 tarah

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 04:20 AM

Hi all

Mmmm starting the journey with monthly pathology tests out of the ever expanding forearms is fun. I have a nursing background and so sympathise with "the others" trying to get blood.

I always like to look for a bit of age when seeking a blood letting person, someone not afraid of reaching for a butterfly needle or syringe.

The warm blanket trick worked well for me, coupled with thinking generous thoughts.

Cheers
Tara