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Biomarker for Diffuse Scleroderma skin has been discovered!


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#1 georgie1111

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 02:00 PM

G'day everyone,

Whenever I have to have a blood test the nurses always say, just as they are about to slide the needle into my very big juicy veins, "just a little sting" and yep there is just a little sting at first but after that my skin burns and the longer she has the needle in my vein the further the burning sensation travels up and down my arm. I whince and tense up from that burning feeling, the nurses always say the burning sensation is because sclero makes everything sensitive, before I had sclero I always only felt the sting but now it's sting then burning. Are the nurses right with that notion that sclero causes sensitivity on the skin,do any of you get the same reaction or other reactions other than the traditional sting ?

"g"

#2 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 03:06 PM

Hello "G"

I have had areas of skin that became hypersensitive but they were areas of tight "scleroderma" skin. I had a vein go into what I think was some sort of spasm after a blood test and found that very painful but I have not experienced what you are describing neither have I heard of it before.

I don't know what they use to clean the area before inserting the needle but could it be some sort of reaction to that?

Take care.
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#3 Joelf

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 08:35 AM

Hi Georgie,

I have had numerous blood tests (the human dartboard, that's me! ;) ) and I must admit I've never experienced a 'burning' sensation, although I've had nurses both good and bad, some of whom can do blood tests relatively painlessly and some not so well. I had one poor soul who tried to put a cannula in my arm and after three unsuccessful attempts I tactfully suggested to her that perhaps her technique needed a little fine tuning! :P

As Amanda has suggested, perhaps you have an allergic reaction to the substance they rub on your arm before inserting the needle?

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#4 janey

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 12:39 PM

Georgie,

I get blood drawn on a monthly basis, but like Jo and Amanda, I've never had a burning sensation. My veins are very sensitive, especially to the changing of the vials, but no burning. I do however, always insist on a butterfly. They know me now so I don't even have to ask, but with the butterfly I barely feel the poke and I don't feel the changing of the vials at all. So you might try asking for a butterfly next time. If you still get that burning sensation, then mention it to your doctor because that's not normal. I'll ditto Jo and Amanda on the allergic reaction thing.
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#5 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 12:56 PM

Hi "G",

I'm with the others, I've never had any burning sensation from a regular blood draw, nor have I ever heard of such a thing attributed to scleroderma, either.

However, I am definitely a more difficult blood draw than I was many years ago, and I also have to insist upon a butterfly. If my veins look absent or if there's any difficulty trying to get a first draw, I insist on a time out with a heating pad. That helps relax the veins and makes the draw easier.

I actually suspect that they might be wiping the needle down with something, which is making it more painful. Like, maybe if they are rubbing the needle with an alcohol wipe first, that could sting a lot! So watch their technique and make sure if they are wiping your arm with an alcohol pad first that the area has a chance to dry before they are plunging the needle. Also hang around the area, see if other people are noticing the same thing. I rather suspect it is more due to their technique than anything at all to do with scleroderma, unless you have very significant skin involvement in that area that is making for a very tough poke. But of course, I have no medical training at all so I may be wrong, I often am!

Also make sure they are always using a butterfly. This doesn't sound like a "usual" problem or one due to scleroderma. Scleroderma usually just makes some very tough draws.

I had surgery delayed for an hour once because nobody could get a good vein. Finally the surgeon came in and did it himself and I was a black and blue pincushion from my hands to my elbows by the time they were done! But usually it's not that bad. Also drink ample water beforehand because it makes for easier (and less painful) draws. Any sort of dehydration can make a blood draw much more difficult.
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
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#6 georgie1111

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 02:42 PM

Thanks for your input Amanda, Jo, Janey and Shelley,

I must say that I doubted that it was sclero related; because of the burning the nurses did wait for the alcohol wipe to dry thinking it was that causing the burning and they always use the pediatric butterfly needles to help with the burning but still as long as the needle was in my vein the burning would happen. As soon as they pull the needle out the burning would stop. I have another disease completely non related to sclero called Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (C.R.P.S); it's not a life threatening disease but is a degenerative nerve disease that effects arms and legs and I always thought it was that as burning is associated with it but every nurse bounced that idea out and kept insisting it was sclero related and my general practitioner said the same thing so I stopped trying to tell them it was more C.R.P.S and just let them run with the idea it was sclero. They said sclero can make the veins rubbery and sensitive? I was never convinced then it dawned on me recently that here on this forum I have a room full of sclero patients, who better to ask than others with sclero? So now I am more certain than ever it's not sclero related ... thanks again,yet another question answered ...."G"

#7 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 04:15 PM

Hi Georgie,

Well, exactly which part of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) don't they understand -- especially since a burning sensation is the first and foremost symptom? :emoticon-dont-know:

I think you've more accurately nailed it down, now. :emoticons-yes:
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
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