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Baths and Showers


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#1 uknlv18

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 04:24 AM

Hi everyone,

Hope everyone is feeling as good as they can be at the moment. I have a bit of a dilemma going and need to ask you well informed people your advice :D

It has got to the point that I am no longer able to get myself into my bath. I can't lift my legs properly to get in and this contributed to the recent falling event that I have had. I am looking to do a replacement bath, was thinking of getting one of those walk in type baths, as I would still like to be able to take a bath. But they are very expensive and I was wondering if anyone here had them and if they are worth the expense? I have a pretty small bathroom so will probably have to get one of the smaller baths that the water comes up to your waist and not the one you can lie down fully in. I am going to a shop this afternoon to look at some but was hoping someone could tell me if they use them. You can get them with jets in them as well, and that is appealing to have a little spa in my bathroom for those many days when it feels like every bone in my body is aching.

The other option is a shower with a seat, I have had Social Services come out to look at the bath and they say the only thing they can do is a wet shower. Not to sure about those, looked at them online and also during one of my hospital stays that is what they had there. Not the prettiest of things hehe, but if it means no more sponge baths then that is what I will have to do. But with the new cost saving climate these changes are now means tested, which means I will not qualify I am pretty sure. So I am going to be looking at regular showers, as the seat is completely necessary, and I am sure it is considerably cheaper than the walk in bath.

I have been saving for some time to have my bathroom re-done so I have the money for the walk in bath, just a little leary of spending that much money if it isn't very good or doesn't do what it says on the tin! So any helpful information would be greatly appreciated, and thank you in advance.

Cheers
Jean

#2 Joelf

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 07:31 AM

Hi Jean,

Hmm....this is a very interesting topic to which I'm sure a lot of our members can relate.

My 90 year old mother has a shower seat in her bath; she showers in the bath itself as opposed to actually having a separate shower. She also has a handrail just above the bath to which I insist she hangs on very firmly until she's sitting on the seat. She also has a rubber mat with suction pads on it that sits in the bath and (hopefully!) prevents her from slipping. Due to having osteoporosis she's managed to break an assortment of bones over the years so the shower seat and bath handrail was provided by the NHS along with various other pieces of equipment like a trolley frame, a couple of zimmers, a thing that goes over the toilet seat and a grab rail at the top of the stairs. I'm pretty sure she didn't have to pay any extra for these aids.

When I had to stay at The Brompton for a few days I did use their walk-in shower; that was better than the cubicle one I used where the taps were so stiff I couldn't turn them off and had to scour the wards in just a towel to find a nurse to help me. By the time I got back I'd managed to flood the place out despite the water pressure being very bad...oops - very embarrassing! :blush: Apart from that experience I can't really advise you about them; the spa idea sounds lovely but might perhaps be a bit expensive? :emoticon-dont-know:

I expect we will have other members who've used these appliances and they may be able to give you more first hand information. I do hope that you can get something sorted out that you will be able to use easily.

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#3 suze932

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 02:35 PM

Hi
Although I have no personal experience of the sit-down-door-type baths, I would worry about having to sit in the cold whilst the bath fills up, especially if you probably have Raynauds. Especially worth considering in view of the cost involved. Just a suggestion....
Sue

#4 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 03:36 PM

Hello Jean

I had Occupational Therapy come in and assess me for a bath chair but which I now have. The Council would not pay for anything else because their brief is to enable you to bathe, that's it and they do it as cheaply as possible and for me a bath chair met the brief. It does the job but I just can't get far down in the bath anymore, I can't get the water up to my waist.

Why not let the Council do whatever they will pay for and then you can decide what to do next, you've not lost anything that way.

Take care.
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#5 Lynnie

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 07:28 PM

Hi Jean

I am just throwing an idea into the mix ...my mum in law had a bath appliance like a wide seat band that was electric and it lowered her into the bath and back up again to bath level so she swung her legs round. It was so she could have a normal immersed bath; I am sure it was purchased from a mobility/living aids shop, she has gone into a home now ... so it has headed my way and it's great for the days when am a bit stiff and sore!

If your local social services cannot help you or fund you it maybe worth looking on-line for a similar appliance be cheaper than pulling the bathroom apart or at least give you the choice to either bathe or shower ...I love my baths, I admit with my oil emoilents they like you say ease the aches and pains!

Hope this may help you in your search for a solution.

Hugs,
Lynn :emoticon-hug:

#6 chockers

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 06:20 PM

I used to be a carer and still am, unpaid .

I would try first a power bath seat. Social services might supply, it but get one that has flaps at the side to slide your legs out and which lays back .

You could work this yourself once in the bath.

You charge up the battery thing which is waterproof.

I have never come across one of these walk in baths in all my working life of being a carer.

Or try an over head hoist to lower you in, or a bath seat on a pole with wind up handle ( old fashioned but good ) before you go for something fancy.

I would guess one of those walk-in baths would be small and might have a built in seat ???Or a board and seat .

Christine

#7 louiserawlings01

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 08:54 AM

My daughter is now having the same problem getting in and out the bath, however, due to her scleroderma being on about 70% of her body she cannot have a bath, she must have a shower. If she has a bath her skin gets so sore she is unable to move at all. We have just asked social services to come and assess her for a walk in shower and to remove the bath, so I hope they understand that she is unable to bath, just shower, due to her skin involvement.

#8 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 04:29 PM

Hello Louise

My council assessed me as I am unable to bath/shower unaided and they gave me a bath chair as they won't pay for a walk in anything if a bath chair will enable someone to be able to wash. I can use it to lower myself into the bath or just sit on it and shower. Of course this is a rather drafty experience but the bath chair enables me to do either and that's all the council has to do however uncomfortable an experience it may be. Every council is different of course but if one of the issues with your daughter being unable to bathe is that it hurts her skin rather than it being a mobility issue you might want to get something in writing from your general practitioner/her specialist to confirm this.

Skin sensitivity is a real problem with scleroderma, I had it in the first two years, it went away and has now come back. The thought of getting my skin wet, drying it and having to cream it makes me want to scream. I call myself an infrequent bather and I'm proud of it!

Take care.
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