Jump to content


Congrats to Margaret, Platinum Member with 1,000 posts and 10 Years of Forums Membership!


Photo

Fingertip hardening


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Kadi

Kadi

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 29 April 2013 - 02:16 PM

For the past year I have been experiencing hardening of the skin on several of my finger tips. The skin will feel like it has a bubble underneath the skin then it becomes hard and rough, similar to a callus. At first I found myself unconsciously picking at the hardened skin until I picked it to being open sores. Then it hurt and I would become conscious of what I was doing. A short time back I discovered if I clip the hardened skin (which is like the dead skin of a blister but thicker) with nail clippers I can avoid the painful sores. Under the clipped skin is nice soft skin, which lasts 4-5 days before it hardens again. I put foot cream on my fingers several times a day to attempt to slow down the hardening and wear gloves a lot of the time. Has anyone else experienced this? I am without health insurance right now so I can't see a doctor. Thank you all!!



#2 Shelley Ensz

Shelley Ensz

    Root Administrator

  • ISN Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,276 posts
  • Location:Minnesota

Posted 29 April 2013 - 03:32 PM

Hi Kadi,

 

Welcome to Sclero Forums.  I am sorry you have concerns about the skin on your fingertips, and that you don't have health insurance right now. I can understand how you ended up on our site, because in Greek, the work "sclero" means "hard" and "derma" means skin.  So it would be normal for a google search to send you to us, however I really hope you didn't find it unduly alarming.

 

Please keep in mind that I am not a doctor, and although I have mailed in my $5 for my Internet Medical Degree, I still haven't received it yet. To the best of my understanding, and from my own personal experience with skin involvement from scleroderma, I'd venture to say that with scleroderma it would probably be impossible to tear off the toughened layer and find nice soft skin underneath. That is because during the process of fibrosis, the skin gets tethered to the underlying tissues, to the point where the skin can't even be pinched.  It's not like it is just hard on the surface but rather like the inflammation and hardening begins below the surface and then encompasses the skin.

 

And, in all my years involved in this field, I haven't yet heard of a scleroderma patient who attempted or succeeded in trimming away the topmost layer of their skin (even on their fingers) to find fresh soft skin underneath. Plus, if they did encounter this, I would suspect that that particular piece of skin would have happened to be affected by calluses, rather than scleroderma.

 

Calluses can form from any repetitive task, such as housework, gardening, musical instruments.  See the Mayo Clinic on Calluses for more information. Please, definitely, do not pick at them anymore, okay, promise?  If you are diabetic (which might also make you more prone to developing blisters or calluses) it could lead to all sorts of complications.  And also do what you can to get insurance coverage because most of us will tell you that we didn't get any warning before becoming seriously ill, and the best way to stay healthy is to tend to small things before they develop into big ones. 

 

:emoticons-group-hug:


Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#3 Kadi

Kadi

    Newbie

  • Topic Starter
  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 30 April 2013 - 11:20 AM

Thank you, Shelley, for your reply. I hope you get your 'degree' soon! LOL. I do have lupus and fibromyalgia. It was through search through lupus sites that I came upon morphea. I do know that what is happening is not from repetitive as I'm retired and really don't do a whole lot with them (even dishes, LOL). I will continue my search.

 

Thank you again.



#4 Shelley Ensz

Shelley Ensz

    Root Administrator

  • ISN Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,276 posts
  • Location:Minnesota

Posted 30 April 2013 - 12:01 PM

Hi Kadi,

 

Ack, that's no good that you have lupus and fibromyalgia and no health insurance! 

 

As it happens, morphea is very different from systemic scleroderma. I thought you were thinking of systemic, since that is the type of scleroderma that often begins in the fingertips. Morphea appears as circular patches of discolored skin, usually on the trunk but it can appear on the arms, legs or face. The patches are usually a reddish or purplish color with a lighter center.  It just would not occur only on a few fingertips.

 

But who knows what it could be with lupus in the mix? Have you looked at things like, oh man, the name escapes me right now. It is like Raynaud's but causes blisters in response to cold. Ah, "cold urticaria".  Can you look that up, see if the shoe fits or not?

 

:emoticons-group-hug:


Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#5 Joelf

Joelf

    Star Ruby Member

  • ISN Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,610 posts
  • Location:West Sussex

Posted 03 May 2013 - 12:35 PM

Hi Kadi,

 

Welcome to these forums!

 

I'm sorry to hear that you're suffering with lupus and fibromyalgia and I've included a couple of links to give you some more information, which I hope you'll find interesting.

 

Please do keep posting, now that you've found us and joined our community.

 

Kind regards,


Jo Frowde
ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster
ISN Sclero Forums Manager
ISN News Manager

ISN Hotline Support Specialist
ISN Chat Host
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)