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Fructose or lactose intolerant?

fructose lactose gluten abdominal pain gastro

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#1 charliehorse

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 02:05 AM

Hi Everyone, 

 

It's a long time since I've posted. I was rather distracted for a while with GI issues. I was being tested for Crohn's, which thankfully I don't have. What has been interesting, however, is being tested for fructose malabsorption and lactose intolerance. As it turns out I have fructose malabsorption. Apparently a lot of people do. The dietitian suggested that the prevalence could be as high as 1 in 3. As far as I can tell, the symptoms are the same as irritable bowel syndrome. 

 

I was sent for testing by my gastroenterologist after colonoscopy results came back clear.

 

The tests can be done either in a clinic or at home (in Australia). I can't remember the exact details but basically to prepare for the test you need to eat only particular foods from a list provided for a few days before hand. Then on the test day you fast, drink a solution, and puff into bags at intervals, which collect the chemicals in your breath. You send the bags off for testing. 

 

Fructose malabsorption can mean a sensitivity to a wide range of foods that you may never have considered. There are a lot of fruit and vegetables on the list, as well as some grains like wheat, also legumes. It is quite shocking to learn that those really healthy meals you were preparing have been giving you grief. I used to wonder why I would spend the night on the loo after eating a split pea soup made with onion. 

 

I am sensitive to many foods, but the ones that create the most internal trauma are onion, apple, pear and legumes. It's also a matter of portions and the individual. If you avoid the trouble foods for a few days you might find that you can have some when you go out for dinner. Also, you can sometimes have small portions of foods without too much trouble. 

 

I have a friend who was at the point of being crippled with abdominal pain and she was convinced that it was gluten intolerance. The pain was increasing, however, and she wasn't eating any gluten. When she cut out the offending foods her life was instantly transformed.

 

I write this because it might help you if you are searching for answers and not finding them. 

 

Dr Sue Shepherd is at the forefront of this research. (Apologies to Dr Shepherd for any bits I got wrong. :emoticon-dont-know: )

 

 

 

 

 


Charliehorse

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#2 Joelf

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 12:20 PM

Hi Charliehorse,

 

How lovely to hear from you again and I'm sorry to hear that you've been having Gastrointestinal problems.

 

It's very interesting that you've been tested for fructose malabsorption and although obviously it's not great that you have this problem, at least it sounds as if your gastroenterologist is on the ball and determined to get answers for you. Hopefully, now you'll know the foods to avoid, which should improve things for you. I've included a link to our medical pages on Malabsorption which I hope will give you some more information.

 

I hope that you're still reading and enjoying the "Jeeves" books; I re-read "The Mating Season" (one of my favourites) recently and still found it as funny and entertaining as the first time I read it! ;) :lol:

 

Kind regards,


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#3 charliehorse

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 01:42 AM

My goodness, Jo! What a great memory! I have to say I have been reading loads of Wodehouse and have been particularly enjoying the Blandings books. Such hilarious characters. I have to admit (guiltily) that I have only ever watched 'The Mating Season' and not read it, though it is on my bookshelf ready to go. Gussie Fink-Nottle!

 

Thank you for providing the link. It will be very useful, I am sure. 


Charliehorse

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#4 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 09:14 AM

Hi Charliehorse,

 

I'm sorry you have fructose malabsorption, but I am glad that you now know the cause of your gastrointestinal upset.

 

Is it largely a matter of reducing your overall fructose intake or does that matter less than avoiding the specific foods that you are reacting to?  I imagine it would take a lot of fortitude to monitor so many different food sensitivities at once and still maintain a tasty and nutritious diet. 

 

My hat's off to you!

 

:emoticons-group-hug:


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#5 Jac

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 11:42 PM

Hi there,

 

I have been told I am suffering from a variety of malabsorption issues. Gluten has been ruled out now, so we're starting the journey on finding the specifics out. Although I have realised coffee and orange juice causes me problems and since cutting them out have been a lot better.

 

I wasn't aware you could have a fructose malabsorption so am interested to see your post. I am sure I will be tested for that at some point.

 

I also discovered some foods, e.g. raw onions, peppers, rhubarb, pineapple cause abdominal discomfort but have realised I can eat them in small portions and be okay. It's hard when the 'healthy' foods cause issues.

 

Good Luck charliehorse - and let us know because I'd be interested in results. THANKS!



#6 charliehorse

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 01:58 PM

Hi Shelley and Jac, 

 

Thank you for your replies.

 

I find that it is a bit of both in terms of cutting down and cutting out. I find that if I am generally diligent and do not overload my stomach I can tolerate small amounts of some things. If, however, I am eating lots of wheat, for example, then I suffer quite a bit.

 

There are some foods that I can't tolerate very well in any amount like onion, apple, pear and legumes. 

 

It does make it tricky to eat well when there are many things to leave out. I especially miss chick peas as I tend to eat vegetarian meals. 


Charliehorse

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#7 miocean

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 07:28 PM

I just finished an elimination diet under the supervision of my new primary care doctor who is a Functional and Integrative Medicine doctor. The philosophy  is to find the cause of the illness, not just treat the symptoms with medicine. Many illnesses are from intolerance, not just allergies, to certain foods. In order to find out what they are I eliminated many foods for 21 days, most are known inflammatories. 

 

I really didn't think I could do it. I think "diet" is the worst 4 letter word. I have been on almost every -one invented. I hate keeping a food journal from so many years of dieting. I am a sugar addict. I went to therapy for a couple of years for compulsive overeating. I looked the paperwork over and decided with everything happening in my life right now I should try to be in the best condition possible so I started it thinking I would last about 3 days but I would give it a shot. I am looking at it as an experiment rather than a diet. And I did it!!.  :high-five:  I found out immediately that coffee upsets my system. I am now at the point where I am re-introducing foods one at a time to see how the affect my body. 

 

I documented everything I ate. I ate small meals about 4-5 times a day, just because I was hungry. I wrote down my symptoms. I was fatigued many of the days and energetic others. My sleep pattern has improved. My GI problems have improved, I no longer have constant abdominal pain. I am eating healthier foods. I went back to the doctor and asked about vitamins and he told me I am getting better vitamins from what I am eating, and I get so much blood work done I know I am the right levels. I have also lost a few pounds, although it is not meant as a weight loss program, and I need to lose them.

 

The interesting thing is my very traditional, study based, peer reviewed nephrologist is the one who recommended this doctor to me. I am curious to discover what does affect me. So far I introduced decaf coffee as I missed coffee so much. It didn't upset me as much as regular, but did a little bit and I didn't really like it as much as the real thing. I am now about to choose another as you give your body a break in between introducing foods if there is a reaction. Hmmm....what to chose?

 

I, too, am interested in the fructose issue. If I find that that other things are not an issue I will bring that up. Thank you for sharing.

 

miocean


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#8 judyt

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 03:00 AM

Hi All,

 

I agree mio that "Diet" is the most scary thing of all.   Wouldn't it be nice to just eat whatever we feel like that is at hand.   That way we wouldn't have to cook, just  serve up ready made stuff.  

 

Having written to Jac a few days ago (Support for the tough times) about just making the best of it and trying to eat healthily, I now have been persuaded that because I have PBC with chirrosis I am most likely doing all the wrong things food wise :crying: .

Apparently, when ones liver is damaged it cannot store food as energy properly so when one runs out of fuel the first things to be sacrificed are muscles because that is the easiest place to scavange the required fuel to keep going.   Little wonder that I have been feeling weaker and more tired by the week over the past year or so.   I had put it down to low iron stores, which I haven't got to the bottom of yet, but it would seem that there is more to it than that.  I know that my stomach does not empty at the average rate because at the latest endoscopy the Gastro found food in my stomach 16 hours after I last ate.  So what can I do to help my fuel supply??

 

It just goes on and on.   No wonder we get fed up with it all, but on the other hand, if there is a way to feel better then I am first in the queue (after you of course) to try to find the remedy.

 

I am trying to sort out what to do next, talk to a dietician?, talk to my GP?,consult a Naturopath?, the list goes on and I have no idea what I will decide to do next.

 

What or who got you started on this latest path.   I know you are trying to get yourself improved because of the hope of a lung transplant, but what in particular led to this path?

 

Best wishes

Judyt



#9 miocean

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 04:42 AM

Dear Judy,

 

I went to a nutritionist through my hospital a while back because I needed more magnesium and the tablets were only making me have extreme diarrhea. My doctor couldn't tell me foods that were high in magnesium! Doctors in the U.S. are not trained in nutrition. The nutritionist told me things that I knew were not correct, wanted me to eat some highly processed foods. I tried an naturopath years ago when I was first getting sick and I believe that did more harm than good.

 

I was looking for a new primary care doctor and this was who my nephrologist recommended. They work well together and that is my most important concern, the fact that he is a functional medicine doctor surprised me. I still don't know how well this will work out but I feel I am eating healthier. I am eating whole foods, no sugar replacements, and no sugar. No diet sodas. I am not sure what happens if after the elimination and reintroduction there are still issues but I will see. I know he will not advise me to do anything that will harm my transplant and my nephrologist will keep a close eye on me.

 

We are mysteries to most doctors. My kidney transplant especially complicates things and herbs can even set my levels off. I have a dilemma now because with the transplant I am supposed to drink a lot of fluids, but with pulmonary hypertension you are supposed to keep the body dry. I really need another "ologist." Face it, what works for the normal person doesn't work for us.

 

miocean


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