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Spine Decompression by Chiropractor


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#1 Kamlesh

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 10:49 AM

Dear friends,

 

My chiropractor is suggesting taking 24 sessions of spine decompression. He believes once my spine is corrected and nerves are flowing, my pain will subside. It is not covered by health insurance. He uses very expensive equipment to decompress spine.

 

Has anybody gone through such treatment?

 

Thanks,

 

Kamlesh


Kind regards,

Kamlesh


#2 Joelf

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 02:27 PM

Hi Kamlesh,

 

I'm sorry to hear that you've been suffering pain and although I'm afraid I can't give you any first hand advice on spine decompression, I've included links to our medical page on Skeletal Involvement and also to an article on spinal decompression therapy which I hope will give you some more information.

 

Kind regards,


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#3 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 05:52 PM

Hi Kamlesh,

 

Nearly two decades ago, I had spinal decompression done by my physical therapist.  Basically they tie down the legs and the chest, and then separate the mechanical table underneath, putting you in traction. Then when your spine is stretched out to the max, they leave you laying there for a half hour or longer. It's supposed to treat sciatica.  It did provide me some relief, but I had it along with other physical therapy treatments, and to this day, I still have sciatica.

 

Eventually I found that I could get some relief by bending forward, such as bending forward in a chair and by doing (or, more aptly, trying to do) toe touches. Of course, with scleroderma that is always tricky due to acid reflux so I attempt it very carefully.

 

I don't know what your insurance coverage is like. If you don't have insurance coverage for chiropractic, you might be able to get the same treatment paid for through a physical therapist.  If it doesn't work, they also have surgical decompression, if you're game for it.

 

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#4 Kamlesh

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 03:40 PM

Shelley,

Thank you.

I have research and found so much on internet.

I am leaning towards avoiding this very expensive treatment which is not covered by my health insurance.


Kind regards,

Kamlesh


#5 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 09:06 AM

Hi Kamlesh,

 

You might be able to get a very similar treatment that is covered by your medical insurance.

 

If you haven't already, check with your primary care doctor and ask for a referral for physical therapy. Pick a physical therapy center that offers traction as one of the treatments. Generally you would receive that treatment along with a variety of other ones, to figure out what is most effective for you.  If traction relieves your pain, then they have home traction units that they can prescribe.

 

There are also pain treatment centers, which offer other treatment modalities.

 

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#6 Buttons

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 11:11 AM

Kamlesh, I've had spinal cord decompression and root nerve decompression which was done through surgery. It did help me quite considerably especially since the surgeon said that I could well become paralysed from the neck down if I did not have it done. Mine was done almost 3 years ago and I have been so much better - less pain and numbness so I'm pleased I had it done.

 

I do hope you manage to get some relief because it can make you feel awful just coping with the pain.

 

Buttons



#7 Kamlesh

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 12:51 PM

Buttons,

Thank you. How many sessions did you take? And did you get permanent relief?

 

I was talking to Chiropractor who claims to be specialized Neuropathy pain and he is asking me take 20 sessions and costing about $100 per session. According to him, it is not covered by insurance.

 

Also, there is significant information on other websites; it is a controversial treatment. The manufacturer of the equipment claims due to spinal decompression, spine gets more oxygen, water, and nutrition, resulting in healing spinal tissues. One doctor was describing the treatment as spine cartilages are similar to rubber bands, one can stretch a rubber band, but when stretch is removed the rubber band will take original shape, so there cannot be much improvements.

 

I am at the end of the rope as tried all options unsuccessfully, so, I am willing to take a chance. I have tried all different medicines, spinal cord stimulator, acupuncture, and massages, and nothing has helped me so far. My average pain level is 5-6 and shooting to almost 8-10 out of 10 at least 2-3 days a week.


Kind regards,

Kamlesh


#8 Buttons

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 04:36 AM

Kamlesh,

 

My decompression was done through surgery by a neurosurgeon. I had to have 3 discs removed and Titanium plates put in due to my discs having collapsed and putting pressure on the spinal cord. This improved the numbness almost immediately for me but I still have some bone spurs growing into the spinal canal which will probably mean another operation in the future but for the moment what bit of pain I still get is manageable so I'm leaving it alone for now. It was never suggested to me about the method you are talking about. 

 

I do hope you manage to get some relief from the pain soon because it can be so debilitating.

 

Buttons



#9 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 12:15 AM

Hello Kamlesh

 

I can't help with the spine decompression but I wanted to say how sorry I am that you are plagued with so much pain. It can be so draining and isolating because most people have no understanding of what it's like to live a life that includes constant pain. It's a real battle.

 

I hope that this treatment works for you and you can enjoy much needed relief.

 

Take care.


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#10 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:40 PM

Hi Kamlesh,

 

I'm sorry you have tried so many things with no relief.  I know a little bit of what it is like, as I have had back pain and sciatica for several decades and like you, I have tried many different treatments, including chiropractic, various types of massage, spinal injections, traction, TENS unit, physical therapy, exercises, and medications.

 

Most things were helpful, for a spell, but none were a cure. It sounds like Button's surgery is the closest thing to that. Are you, and your back, a good candidate for surgery?

 

You might still want to look into trying a full series of traction sessions with a good physical therapist.  Theoretically, at least, it does a similar thing as spinal decompression. It benefited me enough that I realized the value, for me, of making sure I do certain spinal stretches every day and whenever it worsens between times.

 

Fair warning, though, is that traction can cause even more back spasms, especially at first, which for me required other treatments before and after, including more medications and muscle relaxers.  But that gradually subsided a bit during the course of therapy, and really, since I already had so much pain anyway, a little bit more isn't that big of a deal, if it actually helps the healing process.

 

I should say, I also do other things to help my back. We keep a firm pillow (that I made) in the car at all times, which I use as a footrest when I need one at restaurants, etc., because the height of most chairs hurts my back.  In the good old days, I was able to borrow phone books from most places and use them for a footrest, but phone books have gone out of style. I also lean forward in bad chairs, or sit on the edges, put my legs up, or stand up instead, although standing poses its own set of problems for me.

 

I also use custom arch supports, and orthotic or well fit walking shoes nearly all the time (I really pay for it when I occasionally wear other shoes).  We did a ton of research on mattresses and mattress pads and have the best setup for my back. My office chair set up and keyboard are all optimized for ergonomics. My hairdresser adds cushions to the seat and adds a foot rest when I am getting my hair washed, to spare me from additional pain.

 

In short, as you've probably discovered yourself, back pain is something that can affect every minute and every movement we make, every day.  If you haven't already, although I'm pretty sure you have, so this advice is more for other folks with back pain who have stumbled upon this thread, look at every single daily routine you have, and see how it can be optimized for your back. I have found every little tweak I've made to be worth it in alleviating some of the pain.

 

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Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.