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Streamlining Shopping Chores via Mail, input needed


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#1 Kathy D

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 03:15 PM

Hello Everybody :)

 

I find it too exhausting to go shopping.  By the time I dressed and get presentable, then drive to town, and walk through the store I am pretty much useless and leave without necessities thinking if I don't leave NOW I cannot make it home safely.  Sound familiar?

 

My dear husband has picked up so many of my housekeeping tasks over the last 10 years.  Between parenting our beautiful toddler, grocery and household shopping, and the all too often stops at the pharmacy to pick up my prescriptions he can hardly keep up with his full time job.   He also splits wood for our stoves and hauls water home for me,  Yes he is overburdened.  I am trying to change this!!

 

I have found many ways to have household needs delivered to my home.  I thought I might share some here if it could help you, and also I'd like any input on other things I can order for delivery so my husband can be the breadwinner he is and not just my errand boy!

 

Here the list is so far.  I have found competitive prices on the internet delivered to my door, and free shipping on most.

 

Paper towels and toilet tissue

 

Dog Food (we have 2 large dogs).  This was yet another separate stop for him, as one dog needs special food.

 

Toddlers favorite snack crackers (we prefer the small individually packaged size)

 

COFFEE.  I love coffee, drink way too much....(though I have stepped down to a 1/2 caffeine blend) :)

 

My favorite multi-vitamins and calcium supplement

 

Wardrobe staples  (certain jeans, shirts, and shoes for toddler)

 

Canned soup

 

Dish soap, dishwasher detergent and clotheswasher detergent

 

I finally made a phone call today to my insurance company for mail order prescription drugs.  This should be the biggest help of all of them for dear husband.  I have several prescriptions and they all get refilled at different times during the month.  (lol the pharmacy staff knows my husband by sight and get my prescriptions out for him once they see him).

 

This year I even ordered potting soil and live strawberry plants for container for my deck this summer

 

What am I missing?  What other items can I add?  Suggestions, comments or input appreciated!

 

Happy Kathy


Diffuse Scleroderma Diagnosed March 2009

#2 judyt

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 04:27 PM

Hi Kathy,

 

I have to presume you live in an area fairly close to a supermarket and would be within range to have your groceries delivered - or do I presume wrong.

 

I have never had groceries delivered because there are only two of us and we are both retired so time is not an issue for my husband.   He either goes alone or drives and I tag along :rolleyes: :rolleyes: about 10 paces behind.   However, our daughter started getting a month's worth of basics delivered when she had babies and she found that a huge help.   In this country you can get free delivery by spending over a certain amount so doing it monthly was economical.   As well here, we can order for pickup yourself.   Both of these services are available on line and once you get into it your shopping preferences are stored so it becomes even easier over time.

 

I buy clothing from a catalogue which is also available on line or phone and things get delivered within a day or so.   I often order two sizes or colour ways so I can try things out in conjunction with what I already have in the wardrobe and just send back the unwanted ones.   Our daughter who is much more computer savvy than me has even ordered sale price clothing from the UK and it gets delivered here in just a few weeks.   Works quite well because our seasons are opposite so buying end of season in UK is beginning of season here.

 

Yes we do live in very changing times and taking advantage of what is available out there is worthwhile.

 

Best wishes

Judyt



#3 miocean

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 04:54 PM

Kathy,

Your list is very comprehensive. Thanks for sharing it.

 

Depending on where you live you can get just about anything online. For my niece's wedding I went online and looked at dresses. I just didn't have the energy to go store to store, trying things on, getting dressed and undressed. I found the perfect dress on the first order! Of course, knowing your size helps a lot. I also ordered dress sandals and the company I used was so helpful! It took 3 tries to get the size right but I had each new pair the very next day! Amazing, isn't it?

 

I use mail order for the majority of my medications, and I have three different speciality pharmacies I have to use. Most of the time this works out great! They are very helpful, especially if I need an advance supply for traveling.

 

Great suggestions, keep them coming!

 

miocean

 

 

 

 


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#4 Joelf

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 02:28 AM

Hi Kathy,

 

Thanks so much for sharing your list; in the UK most of the large supermarkets will deliver all the groceries which can be ordered on the internet. I've not actually done this myself as I'm in the fortunate position of being able to do the grocery shopping and since my husband retired he comes along as well. I obtain the dogs' food on the internet as well as the price is much cheaper and also I don't have the bother of driving around for it and lifting it in and out of the car.

 

I think my doctors could arrange delivery of my medication if I was unable to collect them in person (my mother's doctors offer that service) which is very handy for anyone who's housebound or finds it difficult to collect them from the surgery/pharmacy.

 

Although I do have a bit of a love/hate relationship with my computers, the internet is certainly useful for ordering food, clothes and in fact almost everything necessary to make life a little easier!


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#5 Sweet

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 10:28 AM

I live in a fairly remote area, so unfortunately I don't have access to delivery. However I did hire someone for a time to shop for me. I would email her the list, she had my credit card and away she went. I paid her a flat fee, in addition to a percentage of the entire cost of the groceries. LOVED it. She moved away and I haven't found anyone that I'd feel comfortable doing it with yet. 


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#6 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 06:33 AM

Hi Kathy,

 

If you don't have grocery stores that deliver in your area, call them to see if they have "pick up" service.  With pick-up service, you either fill out an online form or call them with your list, and then simply show up at the store at the assigned time to pick up your order.  It saves having to walk through the whole store and also saves a ton of money if you sometimes stray off your shopping list.

 

Just remember to schedule it as your last errand stop of the day. Also consider using a cooler or thermal bags to keep things fresh. Every time you are in a store or restaurant in town, ask if they deliver, never just assume that they don't.  My local drugstore will deliver anything in the store. Some laundromats/dry cleaners will both pick up and deliver. 

 

We even have a veteran's organization that picks up anything, even just a bag!  All I have to do is call them to order a pick up, put their name on the item(s) and leave it on my porch.

 

Oh and libraries.  Most libraries have pick-up and delivery services for those who are ill or disabled.  And most libraries also have DVDs, music collections for free entertainment options. Some libraries even have art that you can check out, usually for months, so you can decorate your walls free of charge with original art.  And if you have free pick up and delivery for it, all the better.

 

:emoticons-group-hug:


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Shelley Ensz
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#7 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 02:29 PM

Hello Kathy

Here in the UK large supermarkets offer mobility scooters etc. Have you considered this? I have been a wheelchair user since 2007 and have used a powered wheelchair since early 2013.

I am a disabled person, like it or not, because of scleroderma. You might find the occasional use of mobility vehicles enables you to do the things you need to do.

Take care.
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#8 Kathy D

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 10:34 PM

JudyT,

 

How nice to hear from you!

 

I am in a VERY rural area where food delivery or even pizza delivery is not available.  It's all good, my home of the last 20 years was the same for a lot of years so I learned to buy other necessities in bulk.  The few grocery stores here do not offer delivery or pickup, however couriers do come out here unless the road is closed.  I know both my courier drivers by name. They are both quite nice.

 

I cracked up and chuckled when you mentioned the 10 paces behind your husband.  A lot of my 25 year relationship dear husband was 10 paces behind me while I raced ahead, until sclero came on stronger.  Now he waits patiently for me as I am always at least 10 paces behind.  Sometimes I grab his hand so he can help propel me along.  Haha now he holds our small daughters hand to keep her safe with us and I trail behind happily.   Its so crazy that I was so fast paced years ago while he lagged behind including walking pace, speech, etc.  Now we have totally reversed roles.  Interesting........

 

Buying clothes off season is a brilliant idea!  I have been able to hit some great sales online for my toddlers clothing and buy in advance for the next year or two, but I plan to research like your daughter for bargains on clothes for me.  I am guessing I am older than your daughter but spending hours sitting the last few years I have learned how to navigate the internet so it's worth a look.  I prefer hand-me-down or thrift store items, but it's just too taxing for me to get ready and drive to town now so I am more dependent on online clearance sales.  I don't require many outfits these days anyway lol. 

 

We are now in a smaller home so I am in a the process of purging clothes.  I don't dress professionally for work anymore so purging suits and dresses etc has been easy, its the comfy clothes that I wear daily that are hard for me to part with..  My t-shirts, sweat pants and slippers I have used over the years are now either threadbare, stained, torn, or discolored from night chills.  Too much information.. my side of the bed sheets are also stained from night chills.  They are a great heavy cotton material but white sheets and the stains are not encouraging to see, I am on the fence about my favorite sheets...(keep good quality bedding or discard the mood killer?) 

 

I REALLY love those comfortable clothes but the image I portray isn't great for my self esteem.  So I am trying to move on to my other hand-me-downs that are newer.  They are a bit dressy for my lifestyle but I think it will be a good change for to let go of my comfy daily clothes that are quite worn out.  And why am I still stuck in the idea of "keep the good towels linen and clothes for special occasions" when I do not entertain and did not grow up during the US Great Depression?  Silly!  Life is too short!

 

PS, I quit pre-treating laundry stains years ago because handling the laundry and squeezing the trigger too many times was painful.  I now just wish good luck to the laundry I put the washer and that the stain will much smaller lol.  I never could get rid of the sweat stains from fever or night chills anyway.

 

PM me if you are interested in where I am getting decent quality clothes on clearance for my preschool aged toddler.

 

Good Night JudyT,

 

KD


Diffuse Scleroderma Diagnosed March 2009

#9 judyt

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 07:56 PM

Hi Kathy,

 

So I did get your location wrong!! but so pleased that you know your couriers, a bit like knowing the postman because he calls every day!!

 

We actually live in two locations, one in the central city where most things are just a stone's throw away, but unfortunately I just haven't got the energy to throw the stone or to walk far enough to retrieve it!!   Our second location is beside the sea in a small rural/commuter location.   We have one or two shops handy but a decent sized centre is a minimum of 20 minutes drive away so that is where online shopping is a boon.   We too have a courier (whose name I don't know!!) and a huge Rural Post postbox at the gate and that makes deliveries very easy.

 

I have to admit that I take the easy way out on most things these days.   I no longer do any gardening of any consequence (none in the city at all) except that I do make a big thing about pruning the roses at the beach because I am the only person I can trust to do it :lol: .   It takes several days to get round them because I can only do 2 or 3 a day.   Before we moved here it had been several years since we had roses and I never thought I would again, but I love them and so I make the effort.   My husband has taken over the rest of the gardening and I have enjoyed buying plants online and having the courier deliver them the next day.   Great fun!!

 

It is a surprise to me really after being a busy active person all my life, how I have adapted so painlessly to doing next to nothing at all most days.

We do what we have to do and there is nothing else for it.

 

Judyt



#10 Kathy D

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 08:59 PM

Thank you all for the kind responses and input :)

 

Amanda, fortunately I do need a wheelchair, though I really appreciate my handicap parking tag.  I have tried to use the electric chairs in stores so I could actually shop ALL the aisles but the rare times I make into town they are usually taken.  Instead I go down the close proximity aisles while I depend on leaning on the handle of the push shopping cart to help support me.  Its crazy that I don't look ill from a distance but most people are quite kind in helping me get items from top shelves for me.  Fantastic suggestions, thank you.

 

Sweet Pamela, I am considering hiring out too.  The house cleaning ladies I found are pricey they are worth it and I would gladly pay them if they will shop for me too, as dear husband's plate is too full from taking on so many of my former tasks and doing so much of my mothering for our toddler.  I will approach them next week, how silly for me to feel nervous about asking.  I haven't met her or had the opportunity, but one of my husbands coworkers wife cooks delicious food in bulk for her very large extended family-I might ask her to freeze extra for us in return for compensation as well.  LOL, if and when I meet her and if and when I get the nerve up to do it.

 

Shelley, wonderful tips!  That was a power packed post with so many resources!   But, how did you know I am great at compiling donation items that never get donated!?!  I will look into veterans donations pick here.  I bet I am not the only one that has this problem.  We get tired of walking around things we don't use anymore because I never manage to get to a donation center all the while telling dear husband not to put useful items in the landfill.

 

KD


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#11 Kathy D

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 02:42 PM

I just put things together.  My new neighbors are motorcycle people involved with charitable organizations and clubs.  They could be a resource for as well for actually getting donations donated.  This is even more important for me now since we sold our old home and had this one furnished as well, and its smaller, HA!


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#12 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 08:51 AM

Hi Kathy,

 

Oh speaking of which, you remind me of my favorite decluttering tip:  for the quickest results, get rid of the biggest piece(s) of furniture that you can possibly live without.

 

I may have taken that idea too far (I don't even have a TV, or a sofa), but then again, the open space feels so luxurious that I don't know how I even had tolerated them for so long. I mention this in case you are just eyeing up a chair to part with, or perhaps a small side table that is seldom used.  Now you can say, well at least I'm not going overboard and parting with the TV or the sofa -- she must be totally daft!, and feel much better about it all. :emoticons-yes:

 

But I'm serious.  It can take less than a minute to give away a piece of furniture, and not a whit of work for us, but the return on increased spaciousness, plus a sense of accomplishment, can be simply priceless.  And in my book, it's so much easier than cleaning out the junk drawer!  :emoticon-dont-know:

 

:emoticons-group-hug:


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#13 Joelf

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 09:35 AM

Hi Kathy,

 

I agree with Shelley and must admit getting rid of clutter and rubbish is very therapeutic; perhaps I wouldn't go quite as far as chucking out the sofas, although I can see the merit in having much more space around, though! ;) We only have a very small house, and when we bought our two sofas, I stupidly neglected to measure the room size first  :rolleyes: and so consequently we had to remove the bannisters to enable us to get them into the room and having got them in there, it was nearly impossible to move around them! :o  (Note to self.....always measure the room and prospective furniture before buying it, as things always look smaller in the showroom!! :wacko: )

 

My husband has recently re-roofed the stables and the amount of junk in them is eyewatering! We've taken three car loads down to the local amenity rubbish dump, but we're still going to need a skip to remove all the rest. It's amazing how much stuff can be accumulated and I've vowed to be a bit more ruthless in future and not keep stuff "just in case it comes in for something!" ;)


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#14 judyt

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 05:46 PM

Hi All,

Hope your summer is progressing well!!   Our winter can't make up it's mind whether it is here or not.   We have had the coldest May day for 40 years just this week and so far today inside our sunny house is pushing 26degrees C :o and I have had to shed a layer of clothing and get out of the sun.   My plan for today WAS - note Was! to go virtual shopping in the catalogues for more warm tops but that idea seems to have melted right away.  

 

Anyway, to get back to the topic in hand which is actually de-cluttering, I have been very good lately at getting rid of clothes that I haven't worn for a couple of years, either because they have become too small (which means I have actually put on some weight for the first time in years) or else they were 'work' clothes for outdoor and dirty jobs which are right off the list for me now.   The local Hospice Shop and Rag collection have benefitted greatly from my virtuous shedding of things.

 

I can't bring myself to start getting rid of pieces of furniture but I did clean out some drawers.    I seem to accumulate all sorts of first aid type stuff when I get a episode of ulcers, then it sits in a drawer until next time.   But next time somebody has a diferent scheme for getting these pesky things to heal so along comes a new slew of medications, bandages, plasters, pain relievers etc.    Today's effort threw out things which were so far out of their Use By time that they were verging on Antique.

 

Next place that needs some work done is my craft room.   Any time a visitor wants to see what I do there I feel embarassed by the amount of stuff I collect.   I have a whole  set of 5 drawers which is full of fabrics, a similar sized one of notions and yet another one of scraps!!   I could start a shop without even starting on what is in the cupboard.

 

I have told our children that I do not want any 'things' for birthdays or anniversaries, I would rather eat out or go somewhere interesting, and that seems to work.

 

This is an interesting topic and one which has prompted me to get myself moving in some areas.   Then again, I think the children will just have to clean up after us like we had to do after their Grandparents.   When I think of what my mother left behind I know where I got that trait from!!!

 

Best of luck to you all

Judyt



#15 Jeannie McClelland

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 06:40 PM

I sent a barn loom back to the old farm for my 'adopted' brother to use when the winter weather keeps him out of the fields and 2 more are going to our local weaving shop on consignment. (I still have one, so don't worry.)We don't have a sofa either - everybody always hangs out in the kitchen and dining room anyhow! We went digital for our reading entertainment and donated literally (no pun intended) hundreds of paperbacks to charity shops and wow, did that ever get rid of a lot of dust! My biggest downfall was paper clutter, so now I open it on the way back from the mailbox. It gets tossed into: recycle, shred, or deal with it boxes in the garage. We get all our regular bills via email and deal with them via direct debit or standing order so there isn't much going into the deal with it box.
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#16 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 02:17 PM

Hi Jeannie,

 

I know, for an absolute fact, that I am not the only one around here who breaks into a great big smile whenever I see a post from you. :you-rock:

A barn loom. Huh.  Let me guess.  It used to be all the rage for people to knit their barns, using similar principles to the nearly achieved self-assembled printed robot furniture? 

 

So really, you can just drop "barn loom" casually into a sentence, as if we all have one -- or two, not to mention three -- just laying around waiting for the farmers to come out of their fields?

 

I. do. not. care. if this thread is gradually wending off topic of scleroderma. I mean, you never know how many of us with scleroderma might have barn looms laying around.  Maybe even getting rid of them might improve our reflux or Raynaud's.  Who knows? 

 

Now, my dear Jeannie...will you please explain what these are and why you had such an abundance of them?  If worst comes to absolute worst, we can always move this thread to the Fun and Friendship subforum but in the meantime, while curiousity reigns supreme, it will stay right here so we can all learn a bit about barns. And looms. And looming barns. :emoticon-dont-know:

 

:emoticons-group-hug:


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Shelley Ensz
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The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#17 miocean

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 05:07 PM

Yes, Jeannie, it is good to hear from you, and Shelley, you always make me laugh! I picture a barn loom as one so big you need a barn to keep it in. I am also guilty of an over abundance of art supplies, not to mention stacks of paintings. These "children" of mine I once thought were so precious I couldn't part with them now take up so much space and my current work is so much better it makes them seem like the black sheep of the family (who live in the barn with the looms!) :D

 

My reading material is also digital these days but my husband worked for a newspaper and LOVES newspapers so we have piles of these until they go out to be recycled. We could open up a kitchen supply company with his cookware and gadgets but they are minor faults I can't complain, especially about the kitchen stuff because I get to enjoy the fruits of his labor. I had stopped reading books because I had trouble holding them so digital books have brought the joy of reading back to me. We still don't like buying digital music so CDs are another space taker upper. 

 

Why did we decide to manifest so much stuff? 

 

miocean


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#18 Joelf

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 05:12 AM

Hi Jeannie,

 

How good it is to hear from you again! :emoticons-yes:

 

Well, I've heard of a barn owl, a barn dance, barn storming, but never a barn loom??

 

It sounds most intriguing and the sort of thing no home should be without! ;)

 

Best wishes,


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#19 Jeannie McClelland

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 05:41 PM

Howdy, as we say here in the high and dry! Barn looms. Well, it depends on who you talk to, but most people will tell you that they are called that because they are built out of big (heavy!) timbers like a, um, well, a barn. True, but they were also, in the very old days, built and kept in the barn where the animals made it a pretty warm place. Mine wasn't that big, but she wasn't little either. The 2 that went to the consignment shop were small things. Now, the one I use every day is a big Swedish beauty, 120cm/47in weaving width. Like all of us here, I really need incentive to get moving and keep moving. Weaving is so meditative and man, does it ever work as a range of motion exercise program! It doesn't require a great deal of manual dexterity either. Let's see, that's therapy for stress, PT for dodgy joints, a bit of aerobic exercise, a mental challenge, and something useful in the end. That last is important to me. Between the sclero and, er, maturity, I was starting to feel kind of purposeless. It's nice to be able to be productive again.
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