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Test Results


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#1 EGJason

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 08:04 AM

Hello all!  

 

I just stumbled upon this site.  I recently was having issues with sun sensitivity.  I figured it was due to an allergy/my body changing with pregnancy (I just had my first child in December).  I was referred to an allergist who did allergy testing and then did further testing to "make sure something more sinister is not going on".  Well, I have my results and they won't discuss them with me.  They say I need to see a rheumatologist.  I am doing so in a few weeks (earliest I could get in) but in the mean time, I'm in a blind panic.  I was wondering if anyone would be willing to take a look at my results and tell me if they think maybe I have scleroderma or lupus or MCTD?  I'm so overwhelmed and I want to go to the doctor prepared with questions but don't even know where to begin.  Thank you in advance!

 

Component Standard Range Your Value ANTINUCLEAR ANTIBODIES DIRECT Negative Positive ANTI-DNA (DS) AB QN 0 - 9 IU/mL 10 Negative <5
Equivocal 5 - 9
Positive >9 RNP ANTIBODIES 0.0 - 0.9 AI <0.2 SMITH ANTIBODIES 0.0 - 0.9 AI <0.2 ANTISCLERODERMA-70 ANTIBODIES 0.0 - 0.9 AI >8.0 SJOGREN'S ANTI-SS-A 0.0 - 0.9 AI 6.0 SJOGREN'S ANTI-SS-B 0.0 - 0.9 AI <0.2 ANTICHROMATIN ANTIBODIES 0.0 - 0.9 AI <0.2 ANTI-JO-1 0.0 - 0.9 AI <0.2 ANTI-CENTROMERE B ANTIBODIES 0.0 - 0.9 AI <0.2

 



#2 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 09:22 AM

Hi EGJason,

 

Welcome to Sclero Forums. I'm sorry you have health concerns and send best wishes your way.

 

Please keep in mind that none of us are doctors and we cannot diagnose you, nor explain your test results as they apply to your health.  Given the way your test results formatted, it is hard for me to read or understand them, to tell which results relate to which antibody.  Someone more familiar with lab test results can help you there.

 

Basically, ANA tests can be positive in people who are entirely healthy, and negative in people who are entirely sick. By themselves, they do not automatically indicate disease. The most important thing, by far, are your clinical symptoms. Sun sensitivity can occur due to many things, including illnesses, infections, and medications. Your rheumatologist will sort out what the test results mean in light of your current symptoms and medical history.

 

Antibodies are much more common in people who have relatives with any connective tissue disease, even though they might only ever develop one or two symptoms of connective tissue disease.  So if you have any relatives who may have had lupus or scleroderma or RA, etc., then you can take heart that sun sensitivity and some antibodies might be all you ever suffer from. At least, that is a thought to hold tight onto until you see your rheumatologist, because it should ease your stress, and stress alone can make nearly any illness worse.

 

We also have many threads on this site from people who tested positive for all sorts of antibodies but who have not yet developed any significant disease (and vice versa). Often, test results change or disappear entirely when the blood is sent to another lab.  So be prepared to go to a rheumatologist, have them tell you that you are basically okay but they will see you once a year or if things change. Also do not be surprised if they rerun the tests and they turn out all negative.  Some rheumatologists only trust their own particular lab and will even ignore results from any other labs. So, what might be life-shatteringly important to you or I, might be just another pile of paper for their trashcan, to them.

 

Obviously, I'm trying to talk you down from the cliff, as its a spot we've all been in, due to one interesting test or another. Bottom line, this means you might be coming down with something. Or, this might be as sick as you'll ever get.  Maybe your body is just still thrown for a loop from pregnancy.  Maybe this will go away, as many autoimmune things mysteriously appear and disappear on their own accord, even without any treatment at all.

 

Find any comforting thought in what I've written, and hang onto it to try to stabilize your life until you get in to see a rheumatologist. They are the only ones who can properly assess things in your particular case. Often autoimmune diseases take an average of six years or more to diagnose, so do NOT expect this to be some sort of overnight thing.  We've heard of people who had some antibodies and some symptoms who were followed for several decades and then declared entirely healthy.  The same thing could happen to you.

 

Try to lose yourself in anything positive for the time being. Absorb yourself in your hobbies, or work, or doing nice things with your family.  See movies, read books, absolutely anything, other than sun exposure, to try to maintain and lift your spirits until you know a little bit more.

 

I'm sorry for this upset in your life. I hope you get some answers soon. Remember we are always here for you, even if you get an "all clear" from the rheumatologist.

 

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Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#3 Joelf

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 09:40 AM

Hi EGJason,

 

Welcome to these forums!!

 

I'm sorry to hear that you're concerned about possibly having Scleroderma and I can understand how worrying it is for you. However, as Shelley has advised, blood tests are not the be all and end all and are really only a beginning on the road to your diagnosis. The stress of worrying about the disease, however, can certainly exacerbate any symptoms and make autoimmune diseases much worse, so although it's very difficult to remain calm, it will help you if you can try to relax a little before your rheumatologist's appointment and try not to worry too much (easier said than done, I fear! :wink: ) I'm afraid that Shelley is quite correct about the length of time it can take to reach a diagnosis, because the very nature of Scleroderma makes it a very difficult disease to diagnose.

 

Please do let us know how you get on with your rheumatologist's appointment.

 

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#4 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 12:00 PM

Hi EGJason,

 

It might be helpful if you could put line breaks in the blood tests, so we can sort out the ranges from the results. I'd like to try doing that myself, but might mess it up and change the meaning of the results that way.

 

Basically, which of the blood tests are positive?  That would be a good starting point and we can provide you some info about the tests, provided we already have the overall understanding that the tests are not as important as the symptoms, and so on and so forth.

 

:hug-group:


Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.