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Do I have scleroderma? Positive antibody/ esophageal dysmotility

esophageal dysmotility rna polymerase difficult diagnosis possible scleroderma

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#1 Keelton

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 04:17 AM

I was diagnosed with esophageal dysmotility and I also have a positive RNA polymerase llll antibody. So far I have no diagnosis . No other symptoms. I have a hard time believing that this is just a coincidence! I feel like a ticking time bomb just waiting everyday for it to hit me. I have seen a specialist in NY and he says he cannot diagnose me based on the criteria. He explained that they don't test the general public for these antibodies so they don't know how many healthy people could have them and don't know. Anyone else have this situation and never go on to develop anymore symptoms? I am so stressed out because of this. Had to start seeing a psychologist and taking medication. Cannot think about anything else. Want to have another baby but feel like I have to put my life on hold. Not knowing is hard.



#2 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 02:10 PM

Hi Keelton,

 

I'm sorry, I just realized this post had been overlooked, although we've probably answered some of your concerns in other threads.

 

As it happens, I think one of the major concerns for nearly all of us in this forum is dealing with fear of the unknown. It's something that binds us together, even if we have different symptoms or different types of scleroderma. Figuring out how to live happily and successfully today, despite whatever we are already dealing with, and concerns over what symptoms we might yet develop, is extremely important. Making a good adjustment to uncertainty, and overcoming anxiety, are vital coping skills that will serve us well in all areas of life.

 

I'm delighted that you are taking care of yourself by seeing a psychologist and taking medication. Think of this ordeal as being a fine opportunity to learn how to deal with uncertainty. It's quite possible that all of your concerns will amount to nothing at all, and you will hugely regret having spent a single moment consumed with worry. Then again, maybe something worse will befall you eventually (in the end, we all, inescapably, die, whether we are healthy or not at the moment), and then you may regret any time spent dreading the inevitable.

 

Facing our fears straight on, and dealing with them, can pave for the way for a life filled with as much happiness and joy as possible. And, it is definitely possible to live with scleroderma with happiness and joy!  So work with your psychologist to turn off the recordings that say this is horrible and hopeless. It is not!  Learn and reinforce new thoughts, such as, you are capable, you have support, you can find joy and love and laughter, and create an attitude that is bigger than whatever you are facing at this moment.

 

You can do it!  It won't necessarily be easy. It will take a lot of determination and effort. But you can face this uncertainty, and learn to live with it, and just accept it and not fight it every second of the day. Kudos to you for realizing its an issue worth dealing with. And remember, we understand, and we are always here for you. And, in a short while, you will probably feel bolstered enough to become the shoulder that is also there for others to lean upon.

 

:hug-group:


Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.





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