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Biomarker for Diffuse Scleroderma skin has been discovered!


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Just A Couple Of Questions


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#1 janeygirl

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 08:27 PM

Hi,
Just a couple of questions!!
What is the difference between a dermatologist and a rheumatologist? and is there any connection between multiple sclerosis, bell's palsy and en coupe de sabre?
thanks!!
have a good day
~Jane~

#2 Elehos

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 02:01 AM

Hi Jane,

A dermatologist deals with issues in the skin, and a rheumatologist deals with joint/arthritis issues. Obviously, there are forms of arthritis that do involve skin, like sclero and dermatomyositis, and a dermatologist that is knowlegeable in these areas can be extremely helpful. There were at least two people on the board that mentioned that a dermatologist gave them their diagnosis of sclero, if I'm remembering correctly.

My neighbor has been diagnosis'ed with several things, including Bell's Palsy and some form of sclero, but she hasn't given me the exact diagnosis on the sclero. It seems that so many of these things have some connection, and most people on the site have more than one condition, which is often listed at the bottom of their posts. Lately I've been doing more reading on muscular dystrophy (I have FSHD, which seems to be worsening again this past year), and found that there's a connection between some forms of MD and sclero.

There's also a possibility that I have MS, and am going to my neurologist again next month to be checked out. Have you been diagnosis'ed formally with it, or are you wondering about connections only? It seems like when it rains, it pours with autoimmune, doesn't it? I hope that at least one of your questions was answered, but if not, others will probalby chime in.

Best wishes to you,
Elehos

#3 kramer57

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 02:46 AM

Hi Jane, welcome! Your question interested me since I had Bell's Palsy once as a child and my husband has Multiple Sclerosis. I was going to try to explain it on my own, but I wanted to be accurate, ;) so I looked it up in Mosby's Medical Dictionary.

Bell's Palsy - Paralysis of the facial nerve resulting from trauma, compression of the nerve by a tumor, or infection. It usually affects one side of the face and may be temporary or permanent. (when I had it, my Dr. said it was caused by walking 3 blocks to school with wet hair in freezing winter weather).

Multiple Sclerosis - Progressive disease characterized by demyelination of nerve fibers of the brain and spinal cord.

So, Bell's Palsy is a response to trauma and only affects the facial nerve, whereas MS is a progressive disease that can affect the whole body. I don't know about the other thing you asked about, maybe someone else out there knows...

I hope this helps!
Karen

#4 Jordan's Mommy

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 05:09 AM

Hi,

My daughter's morphea was first diagnosed by a dermatologist, then confirmed by a rheumatologist. They are pretty much in agreement about treatment, and I like taking my daughter to both to make sure she gets the best advice possible, and access to new information and medical options that the other may not be aware of.

Take care,
Jennifer

#5 janeygirl

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 05:33 PM

hi elehos,
I have been dagnosed with linear scleroderma en coup de sabre, but I was asking the questions about bells paulsy and muttiple sclerosis as I had bells paulsy when I was younger and my uncle died of MS so I was wondering if there was any connections.
So should I be seeing a dermatologist or a rhematologist? thanks heaps for your help.

take care

~jane~

#6 peanut

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 09:00 PM

seeing a rheumatologist who specializes in scleroderma might be a good idea. a rheumatologist keeps track of scleroderma's progress in your skin and organs - lungs, heart, kidneys. It is good to make sure all parts of your body are healthy since scleroderma may affect them. I have several doctors - my rheumatologist is my primary doctor - so it really doesn't hurt to see both. It is important that they communicate in regards to treatment. Prescribing conflicting treatments and meds could be dangerous... but that's my two cents.

Every person's symptoms are unique, so you have to find what works for you.

good luck,
peanut

You can deprive the body but the soul needs chocolate
my HMO makes me wear a helmet...