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Mouth Problems, Who Do I Talk To, Dr. Or Dentist?


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#1 kramer57

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 12:48 AM

Hi everyone,

My face has been swollen for a few months, and lately I keep biting the insides of my cheeks. I always have sores in my mouth from biting the cheeks when I chew food, and I bite them at night because I grind my teeth and the cheeks get in the way!

I keep losing my voice and my dr. said it's because my mouth dries out a t night. My teeth are breaking apart and my receding gums are really bad too. I don't know if I should mention all this to the Dr. or to the Dentist when I see him. Or, should I go to the Rheumatologist with it?!

Did anyone else have trouble with biting the insides of your cheeks and what do you do for it?! It's driving me nuts, I have no appetite anyway, and now I really don't like eating, with the way I'm grinding up my cheeks when I chew.

Thank you,
Karen

#2 Sweet

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 04:32 AM

Hi Karen,

Do you have Sjogrens? This causes dryness of the mouth and other mucus membrane's and can wreck havoc on your dental work. YES, please call both your rheumatologist and your dentist.

I have early Sjogrens they believe, and I was given a special toothpaste and mouth wash, in addition to going to the dentist every couple of months.

My rheumatologist is always very concerned about any sores in my mouth.

Please give them both a call and then report back.

Hang in there!
Warm and gentle hugs,

Pamela
ISN Support Specialist
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

#3 Sheryl

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 10:16 AM

I went to a Dentist and he made a mouth (teeth) guard. I sleep with it always. I no longer grind my teeth. I didn't know I ground them in the first place. When receiving my guard within weeks I had a bunch of teeth marks on it. They were later sanded and I notice now I don't grind as much. As for the biting the jaw. That also stopped after using the mouth guard. My dentist also prescribed a special toothgel to apply after I have brushed and rinsed my teeth. This helps kill any bad bacteria that lingers and make it harder for sores to go away. I can't eat or drink for 1/2 hour after using it. There are several over the counter saliva inhancers out on the market. After using for a few weeks you will notice that you are making more of your own saliva without the help of the gels. There are liquid gels you can gargle with that will help you get rid of your cancor sores. Mine healed very fast when I started using them. I not try never to hurry while chewing my food so I don't bite the insides of my mouth or lip. I haven't had any problems after using the mouth guard. Good luck with your situation Sheryl
Strength and Warmth,
Sheryl

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#4 peanut

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 11:13 AM

Karen,
You should see a dentist for the grinding and cheek biting. See your rheumatologist for the dry mouth. Also look at OTC dry mouth toothpastes and dry mouth mouth washes.

peanut

You can deprive the body but the soul needs chocolate
my HMO makes me wear a helmet...

#5 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 07:12 AM

Hi Karen,

I may be wrong (I often am!) but I think you may need to tell both your dentist and your doctors (including your rheumatologist) about all your mouth-related symptoms. My old primary doctor completely brushed off all mouth and eye problems, though -- he said he didn't do eyes or teeth. So my dentist and opthamologist were most helpful in identifying and providing treatments through the years, and my rheumatologist, about 25+ years belatedly, in diagnosing the Sjogren's part.

But for doctors, at least start with your primary care doctor to see if he can rule out usual causes of facial swelling, such as weight gain, allergies, hypothyroidism, dental abscess, sinus problems, kidney failure, inflammation, etc. That will give your rheumatologist more info to work with, and may even uncover a treatable cause of the face swelling.
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
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#6 kramer57

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Posted 22 August 2007 - 04:41 AM

Thanks for the ideas! I made an appointment to see the dentist next week. I have to make a list of things to talk to him about - Three problem teeth, grinding, etc. I've been procrastinating because I think another tooth will need to be pulled, it has a huge cavity right beside a previous filling. I don't want to keep losing teeth!

I'll make an appointment with the primary care doctor and rheumatologist too. The rheumatologist is kind of lacksadasical, he told me my hand swelling was no big deal. We'll see what he has to say about the face swelling. Last time I saw the primary doctor he was talking about sending me to an Ear, Nose & Throat specialist too.

Karen