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Dry Hot Climate


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#1 heather

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 04:37 AM

Does anyone live in Albuquerque, New Mexico. I am thinking of relocating there and I wonder hot the climate will affect my Raynaud's???

heather

#2 janey

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 04:55 AM

Heather,
I live in Albuquerque, but let me warn you - we aren't Phoenix! We have what I would consider "hot weather (90's)" for about two to three months (June through August). Then that can even vary weekly. There is a normal 25 - 30 degree difference between day and night which make mornings quite chilly but quite comfortable in the summer. I do have Raynaud's so I'm very sensitive to temperature. The highs this week are in the 60's with lows in the high 30s to 40s.

Because the weather is some of the best in the country (in my humble opinion), I wouldn't live any where else. We get at least 300 days of sunshine, so even on the coldest days, a sit in the sun is possible and very comforting.

I still get Raynaud's attacks, but as long as I keep my body warm (I wear lots of fleece), the attacks are minor. Knock on wood, I've never had an ulcer.

We are a mile high here, so if you have lung problems, you'll notice the difference. I have pulmonary fibrosis, so when I run errands, I have to use supplemental oxygen. When I was in Dallas recently, I didn't have to use the oxygen because what I needed was in the air.

It's a beautiful place to live and to tell you the truth, I wouldn't live any where else in the US (and I've been a lot of places). Fall is the most beautiful season. The winters can be relatively warm or cold (like last year), spring is windy and summer is hot to mild but never hot enough to where you can't take a morning walk. Humidity ranges from 5% to 50%, higher on the few days of rain.

I could go on and on, but I'll stop here. Please feel free to email me if you want to know more. Would love to have you here!

Big Hugs,
Janey Willis
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#3 heather

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 05:07 AM

Janey

I tried to look at SE ARizona, but my face and eyes got all puffy and irritated. I don't know is was the allergies or the sun. I decided I couldn't move there.

I am excited about Albuquerque. I love the SW and have always wanted to live there. I will retire in about 3 years and I am coming out to see the area in the Spring. I love that you love it there.

I live in Oakland, CA now but will not be able to afford to retire here.

Chat later, I have to go to work,

Heather

#4 Gidget

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 05:01 AM

Heather,
I moved to Northeast Florida as I found I couldn't control the Raynaud's in CT and I always seemed to have finger sores. Also, what I did not realize is that when my hands turn blue -- so do my lungs (so to speak). As my issues include my lungs, I figured I needed to keep as much blood going to them as possible. The warmer weather has been great for me. My Raynaud's has not been a problem -- even with running in an out of air conditioning. Also, my joints are not as stiff. In general I feel better as my body loves the warmth. I had thought about going to Sedona, AZ but someone mentioned that the higher altitude might make it more difficult to breathe. I would guess that the warmer drier heat is better that the florida humidity but then again, you need to offset that by making sure you drink lots and lots of water and using creams and lotions to ward off dry skin. Good luck. I made the move from the cold and it has been the right move for me. In the meantime, my family is not so thrilled to be here in FL and miss New England. Regards, Gidget

#5 lizzie

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 06:22 AM

Much as I love England, reading this topic had made me think that there are definitely some advantages to living in the US when you have Raynauds - you have the opportunity to move to a better climate but still stay within your own country (although realise that ability to do that depends on lots of other factors like work, family ties, money). As UK is so small there is not very much difference between the N and S so you can have the chioice of very cold and wet or just cold and wet! Lots of people here move to Spain, Portugal and other warmer countries when they retire but is not really an option if you need to work unless you are bilingual!
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#6 peanut

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 07:21 AM

Arizona or rather "the valley" which includes Phoenix isn't too bad for 9 months. The altitude is less than 500 meters. It's humid during the monsoons which is about 4-6 weeks, very brief. In reality AZ is probably really good for my condition. Sadly, my heart is in Washington. I miss seasons, rain, windstorms and the ocean - all things that are probably terrible for my raynauds, etc. Oh well.

peanut

You can deprive the body but the soul needs chocolate
my HMO makes me wear a helmet...

#7 Sweet

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 07:22 AM

Peanut, You could move to Eastern WA where I'm located and enjoy all of the things you miss. :)
Warm and gentle hugs,

Pamela
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#8 peanut

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 07:34 AM

Sweet,
That's kind of our plan. My husband went to school in Ellensberg and my grandma lives in Ephrata. I love it there. So peaceful. One day..... *sigh*

peanut

You can deprive the body but the soul needs chocolate
my HMO makes me wear a helmet...

#9 Sweet

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 11:49 AM

Sounds like a great plan peanut :)
Warm and gentle hugs,

Pamela
ISN Support Specialist
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)