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How Many Of You Have Been In Contact With This?


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#1 summer

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 11:45 PM

Just wondering again :unsure: how many of you diagnosed with Scleroderma has either renovated a house or been exposed to plasterboard (sanding back walls for painting).

My husband and I over the last 9 years have bought and sold a few houses which we have lived in and renovated at the same time. I have been exposed to plasterboard dust, paint fumes etc.


My husband bought a bag of cement as he was building a pergola a few months ago and he noticed on the bag at the bottom that their was a warning that said something like " do not inhale as this can cause Scleroderma". We were both quite surprised to read something like that as Scleroderma is not at all known.

Thanks
Celia

#2 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 17 October 2007 - 11:58 PM

Hi Celia,

It's interesting you should mention that. Silica is a known cause of scleroderma and it is in many products. See our Causes of Scleroderma: Silica Exposure page. Here is an excerpt, from OSHA, on that page:

Silica occurs in the following materials, but there is a potential for danger ONLY when crystalline silica particles are in the air. If you can answer YES to any of these, then it is likely that Silica is used at your work and that it is airborne. Abrasives
Coal Dust
Concrete
Dirt
Filter Aids
Graphite, natural
Mica
Mineral Products
Paints
Pavement Perlite
Plant Materials
Plastic Fillers
Polishing Compounds
Portland Cement
Sands
Silicates
Slag
Soapstone
Soil

Source: Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA).


Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#3 susie54

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 02:51 AM

Interesting because it was when we remodeling our house and they were blowing the wall acoustic on with fumes everywhere that my MCTD kicked off. I know this was the trigger even though my genetics were there also. Susie54



#4 janey

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 04:53 AM

Celia,
It's amazing all of the stuff in construction materials and everything else we use on a daily basis. I worked peripheral to the semiconductor manufacturing industry for almost 15 years. I handled silicon wafers constantly and many times - I would purposely break them to show my students the crystalline structure. Lots of silica dust! Also, I found that some types of kitty liter contain silica as well as the blue chalk used for pool stick tips. Not only have I had cats for 30 years, but have played pool on and off for about 35 years. UGH!!!!! With all these environmental contaminants, no wonder there has been an explosion in autoimmune diseases.

BTW Shelley - GREAT NEW SILICA PAGE!

Big Hugs,
Janey Willis
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#5 WestCoast1

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 05:06 AM

HI there,

Isn't there a small silica pack in every box of shoes, and almost everything that is packaged for "freshness"? This is an eye opener. Thanks for the article.
*WestCoast*

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#6 Patty1

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 07:26 AM

Hi Celia,

Interesting. I have heard this before, and I have to wonder. For five years I worked at an Abrasives manufacturing plant here in the US. They made grinding wheels. My husband also works for a big company that manufactures/tests materials for similar applications. He calls it dirt, but most of them contain silica. It gets on his clothes no matter how careful he is.

Part of my job for the manufacturing plant was going around the factory several times a week, collecting time cards and posting notices from the HR dept. I had to wear safety glasses, but now I wish I had worn a respirator or mask.

So with so much exposure to the stuff, I have to wonder. I was diagnosed three years ago with Limited Scleroderma.

Take care,

Patty

#7 debonair susie

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 08:14 AM

This says alot, to me, your responses. Here are some other things I wondered about, in regard to this subject.
In the late 1980's, early 1990's, I drove school bus. Each am/PM, we were required to pre-trip our buses. Also, to prevent "runovers of people", we were to walk inside of the bus barn (where the buses were parked), in front of the buses, not behind. As a result, we were exposed to diesel fumes on a daily basis. (Side note: Because diesel has drying effects of mucous membranes, I could no longer wear my contacts).

I don't know if this would have had any bearing on my diagnoses or not but I've wondered. I've also been curious about chemicals that "used" to be sprayed in order to control pests/diseases of trees, fields, etc. Since, many of them are no longer used are deemed "unsafe". Hmm. :blink:

Shelley, Janey, Susie54, Sheryl or anyone else from the same "time frame", who would have any information pertaining to this?

Thanks!
Special Hugs,

Susie Kraft
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International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

#8 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 08:32 AM

Hi Susie,

Pesticides are a whole 'nother can of worms. We have a section on that on the main site, as well, at Environmental Toxins.


Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#9 Sam

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 09:31 AM

hmm that is very interesting thanks!!! I have to check a few things... My dad wirk with Brillium many years ago, he has brillum poision. It relaly makes you think Sam
Sam

#10 MicheleM

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 11:13 AM

Had to chime in on this one! My husband thinks that when we were sanding our pressure treated deck with a floor sander is when I really got bad. I think he has a good point. Not to mention asbestos that was all the rage in building when I was growing up. And I remember when we were remodeling our first home ... my hands would swell so badly & I had to get steroid shots to be able to use them. I seem to forget how far reaching this disease has been. I really think my first symptoms were in 1981 but no one then knew what to do with me so it was steroid creams, shots. I think we did the best we could at the time so no remorse, but isn't hind sight 20/20!?! I am a firm believer that the world around us is a major contributor probably in ways we haven't been able to think of yet! Kind of scarey, huh?? Oh well, we are very good at rolling with the punches - maybe we should figure out a way to punch back! Michele
Soft hugs your way,

Michele

#11 Sheryl

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 12:24 PM

Celia, I was also diagnosed shortly after my husband and I built this house. We did everything from dry walling, mudding, priming and painting. We did all the concrete work also all the stone work. Mixing bags of mortar and sand and applying with our faces close up to the job. But, you would think my husband would also have gotten scleroderma if it was from building material products. I guess my immune system was already compromised though. I had already had mild Raynaud's. Thyroid condition treated with radio active iodine. I - 131 pill. And several major surgeries throughout my life. My husband has always been as healthy as a horse. So, he wasn't compromised at all that we are aware of. We have wracked our brains. We are all exposed daily to so many environmental products that can be bad to be around. I don't think we will ever really know what the real cause of this disease is. We just know what put us over the edge so to speak. How many on the boards spent time at their grandparents or relatives farms when they were children and ran around with the DDT pump gun type canister and sprayed the weeds and anything else that came flying nearby. The trucks that came through our subdivisions spraying for mosquitoes. So many, many things that could have caused this. That is why there isn't any two of us with the exact same disease and prognosis.
Strength and Warmth,
Sheryl

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#12 debonair susie

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 12:24 PM

Thanks much, Shelley. Right after I posted (on this thread), I scrolled down and saw Judy's link(s).

It's really amazing how environmental/occupational circumstances can really affect folks, isn't it?
Special Hugs,

Susie Kraft
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#13 Rachelle

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 01:58 PM

My husband is a cement finisher and has been for 18 years. Our vehicles always have cement dust in them and his work clothes rot quickly because of it.

#14 summer

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 05:41 PM

Thanks everyone for replying, all of this info is very interesting!.

Sheryl, My husband also was exposed to lots of building products, I was always more careful then him though about wearing face masks. Yet I am the one diagnosed with Limited Scleroderma and he is as fit as a fiddle. I think though it also has a lot to do with whether you are genetically disposed to a certain illness.

My father in law is in the building trade and he mentioned that when he was in his 20's and 30's he was exposed to asbestos, asbestos dust was everywhere and lots of his colleagues were breathing it in. My father-in-law is now in his 60's and is fine, with no problems, he mentioned that back then he used to have a problem with a blocked nose all of the time, and because of this the asbestos dust never penetrated up to his lungs.

Take care,

Celia

#15 jaateach

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 03:13 AM

I've been in the building trades all my life. Particularly hanging and finishing wall board, painting. I've been sick since I was 28, I'm now 45. I got out of the trades 6 years ago. Health issues persist. Joe

#16 cin

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 11:38 PM

Does anyone know if working around radiation (xray technologist) has and affect with scleroderma. It seems every time I come back to work after having surgery my ulcer reappear on my finger tips after being away from work my 5 months healing time.

#17 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 12:29 PM

Hi Cin,

We have a section on Causes of Scleroderma: Radiation.

I'm not sure what you are exposed to in working as an x-ray technologist. Are you sure your center follows all the guidelines issued by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission? Are you given warnings or education as to possible occupational exposure?
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.