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Frozen Shoulder


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#1 Sheryl

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 12:23 PM

I am going for an MRI on my shoulder Friday. I will call it a frozen shoulder for now, until I get a confirmed diagnosis. My family physician wants to review the MRI and send me to a surgeon. He thinks that is what will take place. I have been hearing so many bad things about Corticosteroids that it is usually the first line a doctor wants to do. Give you a cortisone shot. Now it sounds like this is something I definitely don’t think I should do. My family physician feels it is to stiff for just physical therapy which is what I was hoping for. Do I ask for that again before I let them do surgery? I am just throwing this out for discussion. I have heard you can get diabetes from Prednisone, can you get it from Cortisone? Why in the world does anyone take a chance if it could cause diabetes? Having a frozen shoulder for life would be better than being a diabetic for the rest of your life. Something doesn’t weigh right with this. Any clues, anyone.
Strength and Warmth,
Sheryl

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#2 Sherion

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 01:32 PM

Hi Sheryl,
About 1 1/2 years ago I was diagnosed with frozen shoulder. I am allergic to cortisone and that was the first thing the ortho suggested. He admitted that recovery from the sugery would be extremely painful and that it would be a last resort. I did go for therapy for three months. Therapy did nothing but make my fibro more painful. I am now able to use my arm a lot more than before. It seems that just trying to use it more on a daily bases and to push myself a bit more each day has helped. Try reaching a bit farther up or behind each day helped me. If I were not allergic to cortisone I would have gladly gotten the shot. I had them before becoming allergic for tennis elbow and bursitis in my hip and it really helped.

Best of wishes and good luck in whatever you try.

Sherion

#3 susie54

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 03:43 PM

Hi Sheryl,

How are you doing? I hope the cortisone helped. I had alot of shoulder trouble last year and it still gives me trouble but I have learned to tweek it to help. My dad had a frozen shoulder and did not treat or have surgery when he should have and now reallly regrets it as it is too late to help. I hope you get the help you need . Susie54

#4 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 03:59 PM

Hi Sheryl,

I had a frozen shoulder for a year and a half. It was hard or impossible to do many things, even the simplest things like lifting a carton of milk, putting on a coat, combing hair, you name it. They kept threatening me with surgery since there are bone spurs growing down into the tendon, which causes a lot of friction and thus the adhesions.

I did have two cortisone shots, because the first one missed the mark and did nothing at all. The second one worked enough to ease the swelling so that I could do physical therapy. I did a lot of physical therapy including all the at-home exercises for it. It very gradually eased up and 18 months after it started, it was healed. I've only had brief flare-ups since, which I self-treat with the info I learned from PT.

I'm no doctor or expert, but a single cortisone shot is probably different than a mess of steroids and it might be enough to get on track with PT and avoid surgery. If you do PT, take it very seriously, of course, and do *not* try to skip out on doing any of the at home exercises, not even one session. They are truly vital to recovery, in my opinion. That, and a lot of moist heat. A cortisone shot without a real dedication to PT is probably totally useless, but you'd need to discuss that with your doctor.

With the MRI they might actually be checking to see if there is something wrong other than a frozen shoulder. Good luck on your testing and with your treatment decisions!
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
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#5 Bunky

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 04:57 PM

Hi Sheryl,

I'm so sorry you are going through this. I haven't had a frozen shoulder, but I did have a pretty severe rotator cuff tear awhile ago. The doctor's forced me to use it, so it wouldn't become frozen. Boy I didn't want to. It hurt! A hurt shoulder affects every little movement, reaching for a pen, typing, everything! I really hope you are able to get some relief soon.
Let us know how it goes on Friday.

Take Care,
Bunky

#6 truman

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 08:22 PM

Sheryl:

If they're talking one shot, then yes I would do it.

I've had two shots in my lifetime for carpal tunnel syndrome and the one shot was always enough at the time.

As far as surgery for my arm last year, my Orthopedic Surgeon did not want to perform surgery because he said with this disease, the skin was too tight and would never heal properly and that I'd constantly be in and out of wound care centers.

Linda
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It is what it is...........

#7 summer

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 12:16 AM

Hi Sheryl,

I have stiff/sore achilles tendons in both legs/feet. My doctor did speak to me about Corticosteroids and said that there basically is no side effects if injected,unlike Prednisolone. Corticosteroids so I was told work in a completely different way to Prednisolone that some of us have or do still take.

Unfortunately for me I was unable to have Cortisone shots as they would of had to inject into my achilles tendons and the risk for ruptured tendons or foot drop was great. So I put up with the pain :angry:

Hope this helps some
Celia

#8 Karenlee

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 12:41 AM

Sheryl,

Sorry to hear your having to face such tough decisions. I have not personally had shoulder issues, nor have I had any cortisone shots, so I cannot really give you advice, but good luck, and I hope whatever course of treatment you and your doctor decide on brings you releif.

Karen

#9 relicmom1

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 05:10 AM

Hey Sheryl, I've had the steroid injections in my hip ( aqlso have had a couple in my heel for a bone spur and plantar facitis) They work for me, but like you, I was concerned about the possible ill effects of them. I am under the impression that you shouldn't get too many in the same place, that it causes the bone to dissolve and causes wasting of the muscle in the area. The rheumatologist I was seeing at them time, after probably 6 shots throughout time didn't want to give me anymore in that hip. She then gave me Lidoderm patches to use on the area (and any where else I feel I need them) They are patches about 4"x5" and they have Lidocaine ( a numbing drug) in them. I think they help as well. The thing with them is you can only use no more than 3 in a 24 hour time period and you can only leave them on for 12 hours at a time. I usually put 2 on my "bad" hip (the other hip hurts too, just not as bad ) about 6pm and then take them off when I get up in the morning because at night, trying to lie on that side hurts too bad. So far as your shoulder goes, they wouldn't help with the inflammation, but would help dull the pain. I wish you luck and you will be in my thoughts, I know a frozen shoulder hurts tremondously.
Peace :)
Barbara aka relicmom1

#10 debonair susie

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 05:16 AM

Hi, my friend,

I feel so bad for the pain you are enduring as you wait for a diagnosis and treatment.
Please forgive me... so much going on with family here that I forget whether, or not... you got a second opinion.. in regard to surgery? I will say this... if you aren't comfortable withhaving surgery, should it come to that...don't B) That knot in your tummy... about this... is there for a reason. As far as I'm concerned, by asking questions and doing what you are doing... is the right thing to do. When the doctors don't give you [the answers] you're looking for... keep pressing them.

I wish there was something we all could do to make you shoulder feel better, because please know... we would!

Huge Hugs,
Susie
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#11 mando621

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 08:37 AM

I'm recovering from shoulder surgery for impingement probably made worse by a shoulder separation in July. It isn't too fun. I'm still sleeping upright sitting, taking heavy pain med at night, surgery was March 17. I'm on just Tylenol during the day, but I sure can't skip a dose.

The exercises hurt like crazy, physical therapy was really bad getting it to move the first time. Now it is getting better. It is something you should really think about a while before having surgery.

There is much information online about shoulder issues including a couple of forums. A good session with a search engine should be very helpful -- I felt I was well prepared for surgery after doing that.

Surgery is rarely an option for frozen shoulder. One type of surgery like treatment is to move the shoulder while under sedation. That way they get the tissues moving even though they don't want to. One site talks about frozen shoulder being just about the worst thing to get through. You should defintely check out what options you have.

Good luck with your recovery. It is very frustrating to not be able to do things. Arms are so important to everything.

#12 truman

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 09:27 AM

That's so true Susie; that knot is there for a reason. I always heed that warning.

Linda
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#13 Snowbird

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 01:51 PM

Hi Sheryl

I don't have any experience with that either so no words of wisdom from me on it....but I sure hope you feel better soon and find the answer that works best for you!
Sending good wishes your way!