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Curling Fingers


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#1 Peggy

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 05:50 AM

Does anyone else have their tips of their fingers curling in. My right index and pincky fingers are really curling in and is quite noticeable. Am I to assume that the rest of my fingers will to and my hands will be those curved cupped like you see in pictures? When I hold my hands up sideways and look it seems that all of them are looking to "curl in" but not as bad as the right hand index and pinky. I was just curious if anyone else has this. I am assuming there's nothing I can do about it. Thanks.

Warm hugs,

Peggy

#2 Karenlee

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 06:39 AM

Hi Peggy,

I dont have the curling (yet), but my Rhumetologist told me to have physical therapy on my hands to avoid the curling. I was given a script to go twice a week for 6 weeks. Then I suppose after they show you what to do, you can do it at home yourself. You should ask your doctor about it, as it may help avoid the curling from progressing.

Karen

#3 Kaycee

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 09:18 AM

I do have some curling but mine were curled before I even realized it. My right hand is worse than the left and they are not nearly contracted as some others' are, but I can no longer lay my hands flat on a table anymore. I try not to sleep with them curled up, but it is a habit and hard to break. I also, was prescribed some physical and occupational therapy and went for 6 weeks with exercise given to do at home. I'm not deligent with them, but should be.
Much love,

Kim


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#4 truman

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 09:35 AM

Peggy:

Oddly enough, it's not my fingers, but I beginning to see one of my toes turn downward. Go figure.
Tru

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#5 Karenlee

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 09:52 AM

Kaycee, I have a question for you. What is the difference between physical therapy and occupational therapy? And which one would you reccomend over the other for our symptoms? B)

Thanks.
Karen

#6 ez62

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 11:17 AM

My autistic son has had both physical and occupational therapy. For him at age 2, the physical was like climbing up stairs types of things, the occupational was putting coins in a piggybank type of stuff, fine motor skill things with his hands.

#7 Kaycee

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 04:26 PM

Karenlee,

ez described the difference exactly. Occupational Therapy is more to help you do every day things in an easier of different way. So I learned different ways to for example open a carton of milk or grasp a door handle or even take a shower. For people like us, both are actually needed and work well together.
Much love,

Kim


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#8 bookworm

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 06:42 PM

Hi, Peggy,
My middle finger on my right hand curled without my even noticing it. This was several years ago. None of the others have doe it, although several of them seem a little bent.
I asked my doctor about PT and OT and she said the patients she had sent in the past had found the therapists didn't seem to know what to do about sclero and that it hadn't done much good for them. She did offer to write me a prescription anyway, but I didn't see the point if it hadn't helped others.
So, I'm interested to see that some of you think it did help.

Mary in Texas

#9 jefa

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 10:31 PM

I was sent to both kinds of therapist in early days when only the inflammatory arthritis was present. The occupational therapist was most helpful, giving me an assortment of wrist and thumb supports, jar opening things and some little scissors for opening plastic bags, handles for the taps. Later, she even hand-delivered to my house a grabber tool which she didn't have in stock on the day. The physical therapist gave me a bit of paper with some exercises, didn't show them to me at all. Had me walk up and down, wrote something down without comment and gave me a container children's modelling dough to take home. The paper explained how to do a bunch of things with the dough which were supposed to increase flexibility. I still do the other hand exercises, but found the dough was too smelly to cope with. :(

My two index fingers are not curling exactly, but they seem to be twisting sideways.
Warm wishes,
Jefa

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#10 Karenlee

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Posted 02 May 2008 - 01:19 AM

When my rheumatologist gave me the script for the PT, he was asking me what areas I would like them to work on. So I said, hands, knees and back. I have no idea what to expect. Yet another adventure around the corner. Maybe/hopefully it will help with my flexibility. I'm wondering about the OT if I should reqeust a script for that? I guess I'll see what the PT does first and take it from there. My joints are sooooo inflamed I can barely move so until the plaquenil kicks in maybe the PT will help.

Jefa, sounds like you found a great OT. She took the time too hand deliver a tool to your house! Very cool of her. :)

#11 miocean

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Posted 02 May 2008 - 04:01 AM

I go to both OT and PT. I go 2x's a week for each and have been for about 3 years. OT works mainly with the hands. I start out with a parafin dip and heat, then do excersizes with putty. Then I work on upper body machines. After I am through with my routine my therapist stretches my hands. That hurts because he makes them go beyond what they are used to doing. When I am done it feels really good, though. In PT she works mainly wit my arms and legs. I do some stretching exercizes with the ball. There are some things I do on machines. She spends a lot of time stretching me. I am fortunate that I have such caring therapists who spend so much time with me individually.

It is my understanding that OT works mainly with the hands and sometimes the elbows and the PT takes care of the rest of the body.
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#12 debonair susie

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Posted 02 May 2008 - 07:05 AM

My fingers are knobby at the joints, so as a result... if I go to point at something, my husband looks where my fingers "pointing" not where I intended it to point!

It sounds like we all have different things happening here.

Hugs,
Susie
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#13 Leslie R.

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 05:30 PM

Hi Peggy,

My name is Leslie and I am a newbie, I personally have experience curling in my hands and feet. It is very painful and scary, having no control of what is going on. My hands most of the time curl inwards by itself, it look deform and I have to pull it back to it's position. I heard that hand therapy works but most of the time I use a palm support band to help support my hands.

#14 Sheryl

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 06:39 AM

Leslie R. wecome to our forums.
I am happy to see that you jumped right in and started communicating with us. I'm sorry that you are starting to have some hand and finger involvement. Keep stretching your fingers and hands flat on a counter or table. When you are resting or sleeping and you awaken to closed fists, then open them and be aware of trying to keep them flat. I look forward to hearing more from you and how scleroderma is affecting you.
Strength and Warmth,
Sheryl

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