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#1 smanda

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 03:25 AM

Hi ... can I ask all your opinions ... I recently went to see a Rheumatologist specialising in scleroderma as my Raynaud's is quite severe .. regularly blue soles of the feet and blue fingers and palms (not much blanching though). I also have had minor splinter haemhorrages in my fingernails and odd cuts on knuckles and fingertips etc.

The rheumatologist looked at my fingernails with handheld instrument with a light and put some gel on my fingers. She said she couldn't see anything unusual but has recommended I go for a full check at a specialist unit.

My question is this (as I do not know whether to bother - also ANA negative); are basic magnifying apparatus enough to see distended capillaries generally or are they a bit hit and miss?

Thanks for your help
Smandax

#2 Buttons

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 04:36 AM

Smanda my Rheumatologist did the same test on me & he could see my capillaries quite easily, in fact you can see them on some fingers just with your eyes. But not everyone has the problems with the capillaries so your doctor is right to send you for further tests & hopefully you'll get some answers.

#3 Karenlee

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 04:44 AM

Hi Smanda,

I didn't have the actual test with the instruments, but my rhumetologist looked at my fingers and I guess they were bad enough that he could see with the naked eye that I had the capillairy abnormality. I would suggest you have the test done at the specialist unit regardless. Any test that can help with diagnosis is well worth it.
If he/she feels they saw enough to send you, then you should go. You may very well not have any abnormal capillaries but it's just better to know for sure.

Good luck.
Karen

#4 smanda

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 04:54 AM

Hi and many thanks for your response.
Just a question, when you say that not everyone has the abnormal capillaries, are you saying that you can have scleroderma but normal looking capillaries? Sorry if this sounds naive; I'm trying to make sense of lots of new information and correlate it with my ongoing long list of strange symptoms.
Thanks againx

#5 debonair susie

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 05:52 AM

Yes, that's right...
I have normal capillaries, but have Scleroderma.

My rheumatologist told me she doesn't look at such things unless a study is being done on a person...she's also a researcher.

I also have Raynauds, affected in any part of my body that is susceptible.

Please, ask all of the questions you like...really! If one person doesn't know, another will! We're ALL on a learning scale, as there's always something new coming up. That's what's so great about this forum!

Hugs :rolleyes: ,
Susie
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Susie Kraft
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International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

#6 lizzie

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 08:16 AM

Hi Smanda,
like some others, the rheumatologist just looked at my fingers with the naked eye and said I had dilated capillaries- in fact they are so obvious that even I can see them!

If your doctor has recommended you go for a full check at a specialist unit , I would defintiely go.

Lizzie

#7 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 01:59 PM

Hi Smanda,

One of our ISN Medical Advisors tells me that there are occasional patients with changes visible to naked eye. Unfortunately, many doctors mistake prominent venular system (not signficant) with these changes. About 95% of patients need a nailfold exam with magnifying glass or ophthalmoscope on high diopter with oil or KY on nailbed to assess properly. However, very few doctors do this or even know how.




That's not very comforting, is it? More information is on our Fingernail, Cuticle and Nailfold page.
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
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International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#8 smanda

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 02:27 AM

Thanks for your response.

My consultant did use something that could have been a opthalmoscope and a gel on cuticles, and she does specialise in CTD. I suppose then I should be reassured that she didn't see anything of note. I have read that if you have a negative ANA and no capillaries then you're unlikely to develop a CTD. Perhaps the Raynaud's is primary but then I'm almost 40 (a little old to develop it) and I think that given the severity and the other suggestive symptoms it's unlikely.
Smandax