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How To Protect Job During....


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#1 DBHYGRELL

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 04:05 PM

Clinical trial of bone marrow transplant.

Does anyone have any ideas how I can save my job? I am out of FMLA for the rolling year. I would like to maybe get into the program ASAP, but my FMLA does not go into effect again until February 7, 2007. My company does provide 6 months where they will pay for your insurance provided that you pay the premiums - ie: for me about $50/month. But after I talked to my manager they made it sound like I couldn't take a leave of absence and come back to my job? What are the rules for this? I want my job and my benefits.

A different lady here was kept in her position on a leave for cancer for like 18 months before she quit/was forced to leave.

My co-workers are willing to donate PTO until I get to the FMLA date of Feb 7, but I don't know how that would work?

Just wondering what kind of thoughts or experiences you guys have had...

Thanks,
Denelle

#2 janey

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 05:39 PM

Denelle,

I don't have any experience with this but one suggestion woulbe be totalk to someone in Human Resources. Companies have rules about sick leave, leave of absenses and such and even though your manager says one thing, it should be up to the company leave policies.

Also, have you checked with your insurance company to see if they cover stem cells transplants? My insurance won't cover it because it's still considered experimental.

Good luck Darling.

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Janey Willis
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#3 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 05:49 PM

Another thing to consider is what expenses are covered by the clinical trial(s) , if any.

Oddly enough, just because something is a clinical trial does not necessarily mean that all expenses are covered. The more costly the treatment, the more likely that the clinical trial is not paid for by the research funding and, depending on the treatment, not necessarily even by the insurance companies.

This means that some people pay out of pocket, by thousands of dollars or even more than a hundred thousand dollars, to get the "fancier" treatments like stem cell transplants. It is extremely worthwhile to check both the protocol eligibility requirements and the out of pocket expenses before even seeking an evaluation for clinical trials.

When figuring costs, also include considerations such as travel, lodging and meals; and double this if you will need to take a companion with you. Some of the clinical trials are only for those who are able to do significant personal fundraising, or who are well to do.
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
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Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#4 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 07:22 PM

Hi Denelle,

I agree with Janey's suggestion, that this would be something to discuss with Human Resources, rather than your manager.

It might be that they cannot guarantee you will have your original job back, because they will have to fill it in your absence. That may mean that you end up in another department or branch, or in another position altogether.

You might have some rights under A.D.A. (Americans with Disabilities Act), but my impression is that you would need to consult a disability lawyer to see what your rights are, in relation to your present employment. It's my impression (but I may be wrong, I often am, and I have no legal training at all!) that it is not a flat guarantee that a person with disabilities can't lose their job, nor that their job must be held for them after an extended leave.

Basically, you would really want to get advice from your HR department and from a good disability lawyer before making any moves at all, since it sounds like you are in a very precarious situation right now. Any rights you might have to disability through your employment would evaporate if your employment is terminated; and being unemployed is no guarantee of disability coverage, either.
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#5 nan

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 08:35 AM

Denelle,
I know that when I had to take an extended period off from work I spoke with the Benefits/Compensation department and they were wonderful! I was a school teacher. I never made it back to work, but I do know that I couldn't have figured everything out without their assistance.
Good Luck!
Nan