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Sleep Apnea


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#1 jaxs

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 09:13 AM

can anyone tell me is sleep apnea associated with crest syndrom thanks jaxsx
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#2 Sweet

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 09:48 AM

Hi Jaxs,

I think many people who have sclero have sleep apnea, but I also know many people with sleep apnea that don't have sclero. As far as I know there isn't a correlation. I found a link from our site that discusses pulmonary issues hopefully this will help you.
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Pamela
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International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

#3 Laura

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 04:23 PM

Hi Jaxs,

I was recently diagnosed with sleep apnea. I asked my rheumatologist if it was related to my MCTD and he said not as far as he knows. I went for my CPAP trial yesterday. I slept pretty well with the mask on. I will be interested to hear from others. I was pretty devestated because I don't fit the normal profile for someone with sleep apnea. If it can help me rest better and be less fatigued I'll use the machine. I guess it was just one more thing to come to terms with having.

Take care,

Laura

#4 Lauriejill

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 04:50 PM

Hello Jaxs,

I have not heard anything that specifically ties CREST to sleep apnea but I HAVE heard of a connection between apnea and Fibromyalgia! I have both Crest and Fibro and I also sleep with a CPAP machine. I have found that despite my initial cringe at having to put something over my face I actually tolerate the machine very well. I believe that it really does help me and I have had several chances to prove it to myself by traveling a few times without it and then just stopping a couple of nights to see what would happen. I know now that I get better sleep with it than without it!
Hope you get the help you need!
Lauriejill

#5 Laura

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 05:07 PM

Lauriejill,

Thanks for posting to Jaxs as it helps me also to know I'm not alone. I'm a nurse, and the few people I have told act like it's the end of the world. I hope it helps me to feel better.

Take care,

Laura

#6 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 05:13 PM

Hi Jaxs,

We have a whole section on Scleroderma and Sleep. There are many interesting articles there, and here are a few of them:

Scientists Finding Out What Losing Sleep Does to a Body. Beyond leaving people bleary-eyed, clutching a Starbucks cup and dozing off at afternoon meetings, failing to get enough sleep or sleeping at odd hours heightens the risk for a variety of major illnesses, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Washington Post. 10/09/05.

Long-term sleep apnea as a pathogenic factor for cell-mediated autoimmune disease. This hypothesis strengthens the evidence pointing to the danger of unresolved sleep apnea by a mechanism previously unrecognized, namely the risk of developing an autoimmune disease. PubMed. Med Hypotheses. 2005 Aug 3. (Also see: a href="."/medical/research/causes/a-to-z.html#apnea">Causes of Scleroderma)

Sleep disruption in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) patients: clinical and polysomnographic findings. Patients with SSc have significant disturbance of their sleep. Esophageal dyskinesia and dyspnea, which are common complications of SSc, were commonly associated with indices of sleep disruption. RLS (restless legs syndrome) but not sleep apnea appears to have an increased prevalence in SSc. PubMed. Sleep Med. 2002 Jul;3(4):341-345.

Systemic Sclerosis Associated with Sleep Disturbances. Two common complications of systemic sclerosis, esophageal dyskinesia and dyspnea, are related to indices of sleep disruption, according to investigators. Also, restless legs syndrome appears to be more prevalent in patients with systemic sclerosis. Sleep Med 2002; 3(4): 341-345 Doctor's Guide 8/13/02

Sleep Apnea People with untreated sleep apnea stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep, sometimes hundreds of times during the night and often for a minute or longer. American Sleep Apnea Association
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Shelley Ensz
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#7 Sweet

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 05:18 PM

Shelley,

Thanks for these! I have searched and searched the site and still come up with nothing. I have no idea how you and Janey always find information on this site.

These articles will be very helpful to this subject.
Warm and gentle hugs,

Pamela
ISN Support Specialist
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)