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Disabled badges and facilities


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#1 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 05 August 2009 - 09:17 AM

Hello All

Today I had to go to hospital for a blood test and could not find a car parking space near the entrance. What I did find though was a taxi and various other cars parked in the disabled bays without a badge. Sure some people may forget their badge but I very much doubt Mr taxi driver did or the drivers of the other 3 vehicles occupying bays designated for yours truely.

I never learned to drive and when I was well I would not let anyone I was travelling with park in disabled bays, even for 5 minutes, because I would have been so embarressed. So why aren't other people?

Monday my husband and I went shopping for which I use my wheelchair and we had to park at the very end of the disabled bay only to discover Mr Fit 'n' Healthy parked in the one right next to the shops. Wonder what he does in his spare time, mug old ladies?

Now I know I am making sweeping statements here but you get my drift, why aren't people embarressed to use disabled facilities when they don't actually need to? What gives?!

Now on to my next gripe, on one short outing to the shops the changing rooms did have a disabled cubicle but it's a good thing I had not brought the wheelchair because the disabled cubicle was full of boxes as the shop was having a sale! Woe is me people!

Using a wheelchair is certainly an eye opening experience and just so you know it's not all bad there is one shop I buy clothes from regularly and the staff are all wonderful. They help getting the wheelchair into the disabled cubicle (which is always empty) and will help me with zippers and fiddly buttons. We've bought them chocolates before to say thank you.

If you can beat me annoying experiences I wanna hear all about it.

Take care.
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#2 CFMBabs

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 11:05 PM

Y'Know something, this topic makes me grind my teeth. I was once penalised for forgetting to display my badge, even though I immediately returned to my car upon remembering. The traffic warden stood there writing out the penalty and I pleaded with him to rip it up because I produced my badges right there and then!
He wouldn't hear of it and I then had to write to the main office to get the penalty revoked.

The following week I witnessed his car parked sideways accross two disabled bays without any badge at all. When I approached him he just said he would only be there a moment. This infuriated me because he had no right to be there at all. I just wished I'd had my phone, I'd have taken a photo and sent it to the very office that issues fines!

So yes, it's a pet hate of mine!

Best wishes
Barbara xxx

#3 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 07:34 AM

Hello Barbara

Good to know it's not just me! I never liked it but now it drives me nuts! We also got ticked for parking on double yellow lines, which you are allowed to do for 3 hours, with no parking regulations on display. We appealed the ticket which was withdrawn but the letter was worded as if they were doing us a favour as they never make mistakes...think again my friend.

Take care.
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#4 Joelf

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 05:04 AM

Hello All

It must be very frustrating, Amanda. :)

I am fortunate enough not to need a disabled badge for myself but would never dream of parking in a disabled bay whilst on my own in the car. My 88 year old mother has one as she does have mobility problems & can't walk very far.

I have an aquaintance who broke her back & is therefore in a wheelchair. She was saying she finds it infuriating when she can't park with easy access for her wheelchair & in fact left a note on a car driven by an able-bodied person parked in a disabled bay saying 'You've taken my space; perhaps you would like my disability as well!!!'

I agree that parking wardens are a pain, too; I parked my car in a disabled space, put out the blue badge nice & clear on the dashboard & got out of the car with my mother holding my arm (she has osteoporosis & is terrified of falling as she's already broken her hip & ankle) all under the eye of a warden busily writing out tickets. When we returned I found the so-&-so (fill in your own expletive!! ;) ) warden had written me out a ticket & put it on my windscreen!! :angry: I sprinted down the High Street in search of him all to no avail........lucky for him as I was hopping mad!!! I rang the council who pointed out that as well a disabled badge I also needed a disc stating the arrival time; this was a new idea as we had parked in the same car park for years with no trouble. Like you, Amanda, I appealed against it with a suitably grovelling letter which was very galling but they did withdraw it grudgingly.......they would do well to remember who pays their wages with the exorbitant council tax!!! :rolleyes:

Kind regards xx

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#5 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 05:25 AM

Hello Joelf

The word frustration doens't really do the situation, either with the council or able bodied people in disabled bays, justice. Well at least I now know it ain't just me! :lol:

Take care.
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#6 Buttons

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Posted 25 August 2009 - 01:24 AM

I agree wholeheartedly that some people just don't think when they park their cars in disabled bays. I was out with my brother who is very disabled with muscular dystrophy, and when he came to park his specially adapted vehicle he found all the bays taken by people who had no badges displayed! He patiently sat in the vehicle until someone came back. He made some cutting remark to them that these spaces are for disabled people & that they clearly could walk. They just made some very rude comment to him including foul language and treated him as if he was a lessor person them! Just because his body may be a bit broken does not mean his mind does not work!
It makes me so cross when I see/hear how some people treat the disabled, I'm sure they wouldn't like it.
I would never park in a disabled bay without having the badge even though I know there are times when I cannot walk too far.
Jensue

#7 Jeannie McClelland

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Posted 25 August 2009 - 01:52 AM

Ha! Here in the USA there is little attempt to enforce the state and federal laws governing disabled parking spaces. If they are in a parking garage, mall parking lot or anywhere but on the street, it's considered to be private property and the police, including traffic wardens, can't enforce the rules because the private property is pretty much regarded as a no-go area unless the owner or their representative invites them onto the property. Private security and management tend not to enforce the proper use of these spaces because "there are more 'healthy' shoppers than disabled ones and they musn't be upset." Another one I heard was "if a person is disabled, someone else can always drive them and drop them off at the door." Yeah, right.

One of my favorite rants involves the handicapped cubicles in bathrooms. Seems like they are variously used as changing rooms or storage for cleaning supplies. Grump. I need that higher toilet seat and the hand rail to hoist myself erect. I'm just fine once I am upright, but getting that way on a bad day from a toilet that is so low to the ground my knees are at about nose level is not a lot of fun~

And while I'm on a tear, I once went to a book signing with a friend with MS and who was in a bad way. The miserable lady (indicating gender, not manners) author, insisted in getting in her face, speaking very loudly and clearly, and calling her "Dear" in the most patronizing voice the human vocal range can manage. Guess whose books were boycotted forthwith~

Ah well, then there are the great folks at the grocery store who are always helpful and insist on carrying even the smallest bag of groceries out to the car for me. And the guys at the used book store I frequent who set things aside for me and respond instantly to my plea for someone to be tall for me. Or the lady at the bead shop who's scheming to make a beaded cover for my O2 cannula. There are nice folks out there too!
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#8 Cal

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Posted 04 October 2009 - 02:03 AM

Hi

I discovered your site today, WOW!

I felt I needed to respond to the issue of disabled parking bays.

Your comments on OP's (other people) parking in disabled bays brought back a particular memory that, at first, I was very upset about. Later I became very angry and this has stayed with me for a few years.

I was diagnosed with Scleroderma SSc in 1987 so I've lived with it a long time. Fortunately my level of illness is not severe but I still have some limitations, mobility being one of them. Due to this I have gained some extra weight, which isn't at all surprising!

At my local supermarket some of the disabled bays in the large car park are the closest parking spaces next to ATM's (cash machines). There was a young man standing next to his car, waiting for his girlfriend to use the machine. It was almost closing time with lots of people going in and out of the store, and I needed to park immediately. I would normally have waited for them to vacate the space because they usually only take a few minutes. Although I know I shouldn't have had to wait, it usually avoids the the standard reply of "I'll only be a minute...."! So I parked behind him and asked him to vacate. He answered with the standard reply but I was insistant. He backed out and I parked. His girlfriend completed her business and returned to her friends car as I was getting out of my car. Reaching for my walking aids, I had my back to them as they were pulling away, then he shouted, among other things "....and being fat isn't a disability...."!! I'm not usually on my own when I go out but on this occasion I was. I was very upset and embarrassed. I complained to the store manager yet again and, although he sympathised, it was obvious he had no clue how to deal with my situation.

Since this experience I have never again been out on my own again. My freedom has been given yet another whack!

I wish 'normal' people would consider that disabled people do not ask to be this way and would do/give almost anything to me 'normal' again.

Cal :crying:

#9 imagine2

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Posted 04 October 2009 - 07:30 AM

Cal,

My heart just sank into my stomach for you. People can be so cruel. I actually had a bad experience at work with the handicap parking. I guess an employee complained that I was using a handicap spot, but because I didn't appear handicapped to her, she felt she had to put her nose into it. I actually got a letter from my place of employment asking me to submit documentation of my handicap to them, and if I didn't comply I could no longer use the handicap parking. I didn't comply, I called them and told them I would take the matter up with a lawyer, even using the example of that would be like pulling into a store parking lot and having one of their employees coming out to see if I had medical documentation handy before I parked there. Needless to say, they dropped the issue real quick. I don't abuse the handicap parking sticker, if I'm having an okay day, I won't park in the handicap spot, for the simple reason, someone else may need it more. It is so irritating to see a non handicap car parked in the spot, and an elderly person struggling to get some where because the spot is taken. I don't think consideration for others is taught enough in the home or in school, the comment that kid made to you was so uncalled for. Keep in mind you are a better person than he could ever dream of being and try not to be sad. :VeryHappy:

#10 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 04 October 2009 - 10:27 AM

Hello Cal

Welcome to the forum, you can be at home here be appreciated and understood.

What a gastly thing to happen, people just take the biscuit. I don't actually go out on my own either although my mobility is better than it was it still isn't great so with that and fatigue I don't have the confidence to go out alone. I can perfectly understand why you wouldn't want to even without the incident in question occuring. Oh yes and I have put on weight and gone up 3 sizes because of the inactive nature of my present lifestyle to the point of being overweight for my height. I admit to having started a new eating regime (don't do diets) 10 days ago because I wanted to, I was feeling uncomfortable and out growing my clothes. You'll notice I underlined I...stuff everbody else.

I am glad you found us and look forward to hearing more from you.

Take care.
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#11 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 04 October 2009 - 10:32 AM

Hello Imagine2

Superbly well done! :emoticons-yes:

The appearance of the sclerodermian can cause these issues, you see we often look fit and healthy when we are in fact anything but. If I hear one more time how well I look my head will explode. :emoticon-bang-head:

Take care.
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#12 TheTigz

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 06:27 AM

These are my experiences of the wonder of disabled parking bays!

My parents are both disabled and when I was in my early 20's I was at the supermarket with them. They had parked in the disabled bays and after putting all the shopping in the car, I (being fairly healthy at that time) returned the trolley to the supermarket. When walking back to the car, I was almost run over by a man trying to park in the disabled space next to them before anyone else got it. His bumper actually banged into my knee, and when he got out of the car, no apology, in fact he began shouting at me for crossing over the bay! Anyways, Police were called etc etc and it was dealt with.

The next experience has happened to me a number of times. I was born with a deformed hip, pelvis and spine which I coped with very well until I was in my early 20's and had to start using sticks. I started having to use a wheelchair when I was 25 and was confined to it from the age of 28. Now without getting out the measuring tape and measuring my legs and finding a 2 and half inch difference in length, I look completely normal and I think this is where I have run into problems. For some reason, other disabled people, who are with no disrespect intended, in their elder years, seem to not realise that there are young disabled people out there. I have had abuse shouted at me and people accost me in my car when parking in a disabled bay about not having any right to be using them. Only when I have shown them my picture on the Blue Badge (or the old Orange ones) or my wheelchair and sticks in the car, have they begrudgingly backed off. Not once have I been given an apology.

No-one can look at a person and tell their medical history, not even doctors can. And there seems to be a part of society does not realise young people can be disabled too. Sometimes I have felt that I should wear a sign or have a clipboard of my medical records attached to my head!

#13 Amanda Thorpe

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 07:58 AM

Hello Tigz

Yep, people make assumptions and you do sometimes feel as if you have to justify your disability.

Something which can be common to people with scleroderma is looking better than you feel, in a previous post I commented that if we looked as bad as we felt they'd be embalming us. A friend of mine with Lupus was told she had a rosey glow when in fact it was the butterfly rash from the lupus giving her colour not well being. Anyawys the fact that you "look so well!" can work against you because people are then oblivious to how ill you really are, the help that you might need and why you're getting into a wheelchair. Well I guess it's all part of the weird 'n' wacky world of chronic illness!

Take care
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