Jump to content

Do you want up to date information about Scleroderma? Check out our Medical pages at www.sclero.org for all your Scleroderma questions!


Guidelines Refresher

  • Please log in to reply
No replies to this topic

#1 Jeannie McClelland

Jeannie McClelland

    Senior Gold Member

  • ISN Support Specialists
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,706 posts
  • Location:in the Rocky Mountains of the USA

Posted 09 November 2009 - 12:37 PM

Hello Everyone,

Just a quick reminder about one of our important Guidelines:

Mainstream Scientific: We focus on proven remedies and legitimate studies from mainstream scientific studies, as covered on our main www.sclero.org website. We avoid discussions of vitamin, herbal and alternative therapies that have not yet been proven to be of benefit for scleroderma. To avoid malicious codes, we only allow links that are from and within our www.sclero.org website. Please submit all other new link or topic suggestions with the ISN News Submission Form.

The next post following the Guidelines is list of what is approved and what isn't, some cautions, and some outside links regarding Alternative Therapies.  It's interesting reading and I'd recommend having a look.  You can also search the Forums, as well as the Main ISN Site (Main Site Seach Engine here) for specific alternative therapies you may have heard of.  

There are many Alternative Therapies, but two subjects tend to come up repeatedly: herbal medicines and specific exercise regimens:

Herbal medicines can be quite potent and are an entire field of study (phytopharmaceuticals).  And, because they can interact with other medications and also cause some problems on their own, it is really important to consult one's doctor before using herbal remedies or other supplements, as well as tell them just what and how much of any these one is taking.  Also, regardless of any claims for effectiveness, it's important to realize that because herbal remedies are classified in the USA as dietary supplements, there is little if any control over them. For example, you can't be sure how much of an 'active' ingredient you might be getting, if there are any contaminants, how/where they were manufactured.

A similar caution should be voiced for exercise programs that are sometimes recommended as healing.  No exercise program should be undertaken without consulting your doctor, no matter how harmless it might seem or how helpful in certain circumstances.  For instance, the inverted positions in Yoga (head down) aren't going to be a good idea for anyone who is suffering from reflux problems (nor for pregnant women).  For those of us with certain joint problems, high impact aerobics will probably be counter-indicated.

Best wishes and happy posting,
Jeannie McClelland
(Retired) ISN Director of Support Services
(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Manager
(Retired) ISN Blog Manager
(Retired) ISN Assistant News Guide
(Retired) ISN Artist
International Scleroderma Network