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pulmonary hypertension


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#1 erika

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 12:40 AM

I was wondering whether pulmonary hypertension has any connection with regular blood preasure. Can you have low blood preasure and at the same time pulmonary hypertension? :unsure:

#2 janey

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 03:44 AM

Erika,
I'm not a doctor, but from my understanding of what I read, there is not a connection between pulmonary hypertension (PAH) and regular blood pressure (hypertension). I have exercised induced PAH but I do not have hypertension. In fact my normal blood pressure is 100/60. When I exercise, my blood pressure actually drops! The techs at the rehab center find this very weird, but that's just me.

On our pulmonary hypertension page, it says "Pulmonary Hypertension is not the same as "regular" high blood pressure or hypertension, which can be easily measured with a blood pressure test. Rather, it is very difficult to detect elevation in pressure in specific arteries which take blood between the heart and the lungs. Pulmonary Hypertension is a type of vascular disease that can be found in scleroderma patients." ISN


Janey Willis
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#3 erika

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 03:03 AM

Dear Janey, :thank-you:

Thank you very much for the answer. I have studied articles on PHT you pointed as a link.

 

I am not diagnosed yet but have a 30 year history of allergies and allergic reactions and consequently my allergies have developed into bronchospasms induced by hazel, birch and ragweed pollen. Since my fingers have started changing (and earlier) I am reading all scleroderma related articles including this forum. Started to wonder whether my bronchospasms might be something else than allergy (in my country hazel is riding again but not in full blossom yet). Although I also have food sensitivity influencing lungs to contract if I eat something not allowed, I am very careful what I eat especially during pollenation season (bread, wheat and cows milk are banned). When I go to my new rheumatologist I will ask for some tests for PHT.

 

Hoping I am just overreacting but you can never bee too careful with this illness.

Best regards.



#4 janey

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 03:39 AM

Erika,

 

That's interesting that you have all those allergies and now you are developing signs of Raynaud's. Have you seen the Sclero news this week? There is an article called "Cold Case" in which a case of Raynaud's was diagnosed as an allergy; the person is allergic to the cold! You might check it out and mention it to your rheumatologist. Let us know how your appointment goes.


Janey Willis
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International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

#5 warmheart

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 05:49 AM

Hi Erika,

It's good that you're going to see the rheumatologist. You haven't been evaluated yet, and that's what the rheumatologist is for. If you decide beforehand that you should be diagnosed with one disease or another, or have this or that test, which may or may not be necessary or appropriate, it drains time and attention and makes it harder for him or her to diagnose you properly. He may miss something important as a result, or perhaps order painful and potentially harmful tests if he thinks it's the only way to reassure you.

Years back I "knew" I had a tumor in my chest which I could feel and that was preventing me from swallowing. It was very obvious. I assumed that I was terminal, or at the very least would need major cancer surgery. So I went to my gastroenterologist to have a chest x-ray to confirm the tumor, but fortunately for me all I told him was that I couldn't swallow any more. He didn't order a chest x-ray, which I didn't need. The first thing he ordered was esophageal manometry, which showed that I had zero pressure in my esophagus. Many tests and consults later to rule out anything else, they diagnosed my problem as a scleroderma-type esophageal motility disorder. The "tumor" was all the goop filling up my esophagus. If I'd insisted that he diagnose my tumor, I probably would have been diagnosed as a hypochondriac and a very real and serious problem may well have been missed.

So please keep an open mind and let the doctor do his job! Hope your appt. goes well.

Best wishes,

warmheart

#6 erika

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 06:52 AM

Thanks again. Hazel pollen has induced angiooedema and I rushed twice to ER some ten years ago without knowing what is happening to me. Gastro reflux during the whole year was my companion for a decade. Later I went to hyposensibilization shots but all calmed down when I started to take care about the food.

 

Anyway, this is not an allergy forum bur it seems everything is connected.

 

Have a nice evening (or whatever it will be soon at your destination).



#7 erika

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 10:22 AM

Warmheart you are 100 percent right. I really needed such a post. When I read about all this complicated diseases scleroderma might do, :sick2: I immediatelly get the symptoms. My lungs are particularly sensitive to this autosugestion because they start spasming even when I think about the first letter "S". In a way this is not so bad because I stop to worry about my fingers which start to stiff the tendons. I should practice I know. Is there any description of the excercises?
Going to count the sheep now. :emoticon-insomnia:
Good night.

#8 erika

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 10:26 AM

By the way Warmheart, did you solve your egsophagael motility disorder? I dont have that yet but expect it when my lungs calm down. :rolleyes:

#9 warmheart

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 01:08 PM

Hi Erika,

Well, join the club--I think just about everyone is prone to cyberchondria at some time or other, including me! Too much information out there! Glad if I could be of any help to you.

About my esophagus--it's been this way for 10 years now, and it was never expected to improve. Not that big a problem, once I got used to it; there are just a lot of little things that I'm supposed to keep doing to prevent esophageal strictures and lung damage, and I'm finally getting more disciplined about doing everything I'm supposed to do. With age comes wisdom, I guess.

Keep us posted!

Hugs,

warmheart :VeryHappy:

#10 warmheart

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 01:10 PM

P.S. Erika, if I were you I wouldn't worry at all about my esophagus right now. There's a very strong likelihood you'll never have any problem with it. Just see what the doctor tells you.

Don't worry; be happy!

Hugs,

warmheart

#11 erika

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 04:34 AM

Warmheart, sorry for bothering again, but I am curious now how do you prevent your esophagus to constrict to prevent damage to the lungs. I have food/polen induced spasms, constriction and inflamation in my upper chest. With dizziness in my head. It originates I supose from the lower part of esophagus since it happens when I eat something I am sensitive to. There is more reaction if there is pollen in the air. Reaction from pollen comes quickly after exposure (starting with funny acid in the stomach- I get some relief with homeophaty) and the reaction to food happens usually the next day after eating. Curious, I have never heard someone to have this. Doctors say I am all special case.

:happy1-by-lisa-volz:

Best regards

Erika

#12 warmheart

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 08:14 AM

Hi Erika,

Really, don't worry; what you're describing sounds not at all similar, so anything I could tell you about my treatment plan wouldn't be helpful to you at all.

Please just don't worry and let the doctor do his job and advise you when you see him.

Regards,

warmheart