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Finger Nails


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#1 Purr

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 06:06 AM

Lately I have noticed white lines, ridges, and dents in some of my finger nails. I did a search to find information but what I found is in medical terminology. Can you direct me to something easier to understand?

Thanks,
Christyh
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#2 ladyhawke

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 10:02 AM

I too am interested in this. I have deep groves in my fingernails, have never bitten them and have tried everything that has ever been suggested to me....nothing worked....I hope someone here has some advice....
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#3 kaykay

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 11:17 AM

Have you seen this? Nail Abnormalities by Medline Plus (NIH)

#4 Vanessa

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 04:25 AM

Hi Purr

I, too have, developed deeply ridged and pitted nails since developing Scleroderma.

They are also much harder.

Vanessa

#5 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 05:46 AM

As it happens, we have a neat page on Fingernails, Fingerprints, Nailfolds, and Cuticles in regard to scleroderma. The intro on that page is:

Hundreds of conditions can affect the fingernails. Dry or rough cuticles can be caused by many things, including frequent hand washing or lack of moisturizers.

The systemic forms of scleroderma can cause the fingernails to become smaller, and cuticles to become hard or rough. But because there are so many possible causes of poor fingernail or cuticle condition, they are not part of the diagnostic criteria for any form of scleroderma.

However, viewing the nailfolds under a microscope can disclose certain abnormalities of the small blood vessels, and specific findings can be very useful in diagnosing, classifying and staging forms of systemic scleroderma.

Unfortunately, in the U.S. such testing is frequently not covered by insurance companies, so there is widespread reluctance to do nailfold testing -- even though it is a very quick, easy, noninvasive, and economical way to diagnose and classify systemic forms of scleroderma.
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Shelley Ensz
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International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#6 Purr

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 12:01 PM

Thank you Kaykay! That is exactly what I was looking for. I let you know if I learn any more.

Christyh
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#7 Purr

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 08:37 AM

Thanks again, kaykay. It was written for the average person and the pictures were very helpful. I'll take a print-out to my doctor when I go. Since I have osteoarthritis, scleroderma, lupus, raynauds, and other assorted diseases, it will probably be like tossing a coin.

Vanessa and Ladyhawk, the website kaykay suggested is very good. Check it out.

Shelley, thanks for your help too.

Christyh
Love makes the world go around!