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Staff Infections


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#1 oddone

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 07:53 AM

Hi - just a quick question after reading Janey's ordeal.
She had mentioned that she had contracted a staff infection.
Are staff infections common in sclero?
If not common, are they dangerous?
Oddone - Spouse - 38 yr old Husband diagnosed October 2006, Diffuse Systemic Scleroderma
Normal PFT(July 06), ECG(Nov/06)

#2 Guest_Sherrill_*

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 10:10 AM

Hi,

Actually the correct spelling for this is staph infection, which is short for staphylococcus infection. Janey probably made a "typo"! :mellow:

Staphylococci bacteria are extremely common, and indeed most of us have them on our skin all the time, without any bad effects. They mainly seem to cause problems when our immune systems are a bit under par, and this allows the bacteria to gain a foothold in the system in one way or another. Janey's immune system was very depressed with taking the Cytoxan, and this didn't help her ward off the infection. Quite apart from the fact that she was very "under the weather" because of her septic shock, pneumonia, etc.

I have peritoneal dialysis for kidney failure, and one of the main bacteria we have to be vigilant for when handling all the equipment is the staphylococcus one. This because it is usually on the skin, and we have to touch the skin to start the dialysis etc. (The whole procedure would take too long to explain here). So strict hygiene and antisepsis is the order of the day. If a staph bacteria gets into the peritoneum with the dialysis it causes peritonitis! I've had that 5 times, but it wasn't caused by staph, but 4 times by E. coli, and once by strep bacteria, but that's another story!

Anyway, most anyone can get staph infections, and that includes sclero patients. Probably the most common sort would be a skin infection, as happened to Janey, but that can become VERY serious indeed if the immune system is depressed as hers was!

Just remember that usually the ordinary staph infections can be cleared up with antibiotics, but don't treat any of them lightly! If in doubt about any sort of infection at all, see your doctor! But don't have a mad panic about any of the above, just be sensible.

Warm hugs,

#3 Guest_Sherrill_*

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 10:42 AM

I just checked my own spelling on this, and although I found many references to the way I originally spelled it as staphlococcus, the dictionary didn't recognize it as that, but had it spelt as Staphylococcus. It can probably be spelt either way, as Medline spelled it without the "y". :unsure:

I also read that the bacteria is common in causing food poisoning, and can cause pneumonia, and some other "nasties", but probably as I said, skin infections are the most common problem.

Warm hugs,

#4 oddone

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 11:33 AM

Thanks Sherrill.

Its just all so connected.
My husband has been treating a staph infection for 4 weeks, with antibiotics, with no changes in appearance.(skin)
And when I read that Janey also had one (albeit probably the least of the complications), I was just wondering.
I dont think his Dr was too concerned, but never know how seriously to take things.
Oddone - Spouse - 38 yr old Husband diagnosed October 2006, Diffuse Systemic Scleroderma
Normal PFT(July 06), ECG(Nov/06)

#5 Guest_Sherrill_*

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 05:52 PM

Hi again,

4 weeks does sound a long time to go without any results! Did the doctor have the infection cultured, or did he just prescribe antibiotics, and "hope for the best"? If he did the latter it's possible that your husband has a different infection, and different antibiotics or treatment may be required. Only a culture would show if this is necessary.

Warm hugs,