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Slouching


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#1 Sam

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 02:57 AM

Hello all, I was wondering if any of you notice that you slouch? I do and I can remember the one doctor telling me to try and sit straight. I have and have but I always go back to slouching because it doesn't hurt but when I do that its making other areas hurt like my left side. So what do you have to do and what is out there to help with not slouching? I had seen the chiropractor yesterday and it had helped so much and this morning I am sore which doesn't surprise me any. Maybe I should of asked the chiro what I can do. Maybe I will next Monday when I see him.
Sam

#2 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 04:09 AM

Hi Sam,

I'm not a doctor and I do not own stock in any anti-slouch company. You can slouch just as much as you want, whenever you want, if you want to, as far as I'm concerned. :VeryHappy:

There are just a few things to consider when making up your mind to slouch or not.

One is that it can be very hard on the back muscles. So if you want to slouch all the time (yes that's always an option!) it is important to supplement the slouching with a good round of regular back exercises, or everything will whomp itself out of place eventually and you will have excess aches and pains.

Another is that slouching is 'body language' for depression or low self-esteem. It probably means that you're just relaxed or at ease perhaps, but that's how other people instinctively 'read' it. They can also interpret it to mean that you are disinterested in them or the topic at hand.

Do you remember that old school-teacher line, "Sit up! Pay attention!" There you go.

Now, illness and poor muscles can make the whole thing harder to do. You can cheat by buying what are called 'posture bras'. But they are only a short-term solution while you also work on building back muscles back up to bare minimum. It is less stress, easier, and less painful to use good posture (whether sitting or standing). This doesn't mean a military bearing, but rather thinking like you are a puppet, and somebody is pulling you up a tiny bit.

Also make sure you have a few seating options in your home that are conducive to good posture. My comfy easy chair is so posture-averse! But my other chairs, where I spend most of my time, are fine.

There is an odd thing too, about how our body affects our spirits. Simply making a fake smile can make us feel better instantly, and so can sitting or standing up straight can give us an instant little perk of energy! I don't know about you, but I need ALL the energy I can possibly muster. So if that sometimes requires not slouching, I try to make the extra effort as it always pays me back.
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#3 Jeannie McClelland

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 10:30 AM

And don't forget, when you are slouching, you are decreasing breathing room! Posted Image
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#4 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 11:01 AM

Okay, Jeannie, I'll see you one and raise you one:

And slouching way over can put pressure on the stomach and thus encourage the development of heartburn, too.
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

#5 Sam

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Posted 24 March 2010 - 01:11 PM

Thanks Shelley and Jeannie, after I had posted I went on a search for something to read about slouching I found a great article. It basically said the same thing as what you said Shelley, but I remember my parents and grandparents telling me to sit up straight. I always thought I did apparently I didn't and should have listened years ago, I guess now I am paying for it.

Yes that is a decision I have to make and I decided to really watch how I sit and stand and I so need to relax. I feel so uptight at times. My back is killing me and so is the neck area. So hopefully after a few days I will get some relief soon. Well again thanks. :)
Sam

#6 KarenL

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 12:26 PM

Hi Sam,
Most people slouch and it's because of habit and tiredness. I go to a chiropractor too and she taught me what to do. You have to strengthen the back muscles. You sit or stand nice and tall then force your shoulders down and back. you squeeze the muscles in the center of your back inward and hold. Like you are trying to press your shoulder blades together. Do this as often as you think of it. Also if you can get to a gym, do the pull down bar with your shoulders in the down and back posture. Pull the bar down towards your chest, squeezing those shoulder blades together. The chiropractor says that pain is a signal that something is wrong and is not to be ignored. I thought she was crazy to suggest that exercising would cure the pain I felt from slouching but in about a month of these exercises I have become nearly pain free and don't slouch! I am much more conscious of my posture and carriage overall. One other thought, going to a chiropractor shouldn't hurt the next day. Make sure you have a good one!
Karen

#7 Sam

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 02:02 AM

I had seen the chiro yesterday and asked if there was something I could wear to help me not to slouch anymore he said there is stuff but does not recommend it, I need to do something it is causing more pain on my left side in front. Luckey for me I can get adjusted for four times a month wish it was more but I just don't know. Plus its not helping my pain in my back at all. I am trying so hard to sit up straight and put my shoulders back. Then I catch myself slouching again. I know I can do this, Thank Karen for you suggestion sounds good to me. Sam
Sam

#8 Snickerdoodle

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 05:29 PM

I have a lot of fatigue in my neck due to three disks in terrible shape. One of the disks has burst, and the doctor said there is *debris* all around the area. Sometimes it causes me LOTS of problems, but other times mostly just fatigue.

I picked up a traveling neck support pillow. And when I'm feeling the most fatigued with the pain I wear it around the house, and I take it to bed with me and wear it all night. I really get such relief from it. I'm amazed.

#9 Shelley Ensz

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 03:07 AM

Hi Snickerdoodle,

I'm sorry you have neck issues; I sure know what that's like, mostly from a stupid human trick on a snowmobile many decades ago.

Anyway, I'm not very familiar with traveling neck support pillows.

Do you just use them as a pillow, or do they attach around your neck, somehow?
Warm Hugs,

Shelley Ensz
Founder and President
International Scleroderma Network (ISN)
Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.