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Raynaud's: Heatsock Directions

Author: Shelley Ensz. Scleroderma is highly variable. See Types of Scleroderma. Read Disclaimer

Warning: All heated grain-filled products can pose safety and fire hazards. Use at your own risk. See Disclaimer.

What are Heatsocks?
Use for Raynaud's
Other Uses for Heatsocks
Warnings!
Fire Hazard
Never Put in Oven
Not for Kids or Old Folks
Don't Use While Sleeping
Attach Warning Labels
No-Sew Heatsock Directions
Fancy Heatsock Directions
References

What are Heatsocks?

Heatsocks are grain-filled socks, which can be microwaved to use as a heating pad. You can make them yourself, or buy them. One popular brand in the U.S. is "Bed Buddies" which are often available at pharmacies and cost around $10.

Use for Raynaud's

Anyone who needs a heating pad, for any purpose can benefit from Heatsocks. However, they are especially useful for people with Raynaud's, to help with keeping warm or rewarming the hands or feet.

Other Uses for Heatsocks

Injuries : Make long heatsocks, to wrap around knees or elbows, as needed.
Feet : Use as foot-warmers for tired, achy, or cold feet.
Office: : Heatsocks make a great warm wrist rest at the computer.
Car : Take a warm one with you to use as a neck pillow (or hand warmer).
Kitchen : Use (clean ones) for keeping baked goods warm for serving.

Warnings!

Fire Hazard

Any heated grain-filled product can pose a fire hazard. This hazard increases if the products are over-heated, or heated too many times in one day. To reduce this risk, if you use them often, make several sets of them and alternate use throughout the day.

Never Put in Oven

Always use a microwave to warm up grain-filled socks. Never use an oven, since this poses a great fire hazard.

Don't Use for Kids or Old Folks

Do not use any heated grain-filled socks on children or the elderly or those with impaired skin sensations (such as with diabetes), as they could cause serious burns or even fires.

Don't Use While Sleeping

Do not use any heated grain-filled socks while sleeping, as it could cause serious burns or even fires.

Attach Warning Labels

Heatsocks are truly wonderful if used properly. However, every product has its limitations. If you make these to sell or distribute to others in any fashion, be sure to include the following safety warnings. And follow the warnings yourself, too!

No-Sew Heatsock Directions by Shelley Ensz

Take a pair of athletic socks. Pour 3 cups of long grain rice in each one. Close with a (sturdy) rubber band. To warm them, microwave for about 1-1/2 minutes per sock. Use for: Foot warmers, hand warmers, heating pad. To clean, pour the rice out & wash the socks. Tip: do not use wire twist ties for closure unless you like watching fireworks in your microwave.

Fancy HeatSock Directions by Nancy Medeiros(1)

Materials Needed

Tube Sock, about 21" long (those sports one's that guys use)

Cotton Material, about 27"x 8 1/2" (or some lightweight material that's comfy to the skin and can be put in a microwave)

Rice, 1 bag—the heavy kind of rice, not that lightweight Uncle Ben's or 3-minute stuff. Use the kind in the bags, I do not think it matters if its white or brown.

Velcro, 6" in length

Sewing Machine (or needle and thread will do)

Scissors or Rolling Cutter

Ruler

Iron

Directions

1. With your 27" x 8 1/2" material, at one end, fold fabric on one side only, about 1" down, wrong sides together. Press with iron and sew across, like you're making a cuff.

2. Cut your 6" piece of Velcro in two 3" pieces. Center the 2 pieces on the "cuff" area, one after the other and sew them in place leaving enough room to make a fold on one side and a seam on the other when we begin the next step.

3. Fold the fabric lengthwise, right sides together, matching up all edges and corners. (Velcro sides should be facing out, on top and bottom). Begin sewing 1/4" seam allowance from fold at bottom across, then continue sewing the length part up all the way to the top of the cuff.

4. Turn right side out and you should have a holder for your heat sock with a Velcro opening.

5. Take your tube sock and fill it about 1/2 way up.

6. Sew the opening of the sock together at least twice to ensure complete closure.

7. Put your sock into the sock holder and press the Velcro together.

8. Put it in your microwave for about 3 minutes. Take it out and put it on your neck or other spot.

9. Lie back and relax. These are supposed to last about 3 hours.

NEVER put these in an oven.
Heat them up ONLY in a MICROWAVE, and always use with caution.

You can make your own variations of this. You can make them for your support groups or give them as gifts. They do not take very long to make at all. And yes, you can make various other designs to fit your back or over your eyes, or on your legs, etc. You've just got to be inventive.

References

(1) Heatsock Directionsby Nancy Medeiros of San Diego, CA. Reprinted here with permission of author.

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