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Generalized Morphea Scleroderma

Overviewa
Diagnosis
Photos
Treatments
Causes
Personal Stories

Overview

Generalized morphea is a form of localized scleroderma. When morphea skin plaques are very widespread, it is referred to as generalized morphea. The skin patches become very hard and dark and spread over large areas of the body. Underlying muscles are often affected, causing them to tighten and atrophy.

Symptoms of Generalized Morphea

Symptoms of generalized morphea are widespread morphea lesions over large areas of the body, which may sometimes cause limb contractures and atrophy.

Antiphospholipid Syndrome Symptoms of Antiphospholipid Syndrome include deep vein thrombosis (DVT), chronic leg ulcers, recurrent miscarriages, headache, heart attacks, renal vein and artery thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and pulmonary hypertension. It is identified by the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies, in a blood test. The same antibodies have been associated with generalized morphea scleroderma. ISN.

Photos of Generalized Morphea

Photo of Generalized Morphea. (See Multimedia Library) This photograph shows generalized morphea on the trunk of a patient (reproduced with permission from Mayo Clinic Proceedings, from Peterson, LS et al). Medscape.

Diagnosis of Generalized Morphea

Diagnosis of morphea is often confirmed with a skin biopsy, which is usually performed by a dermatologist. Morphea is usually diagnosed and treated by dermatologists.

(Case Reports) Unilateral generalized morphea (UGM) is a rare variant of localized scleroderma. As the onset of UGM usually occurs in pediatric patients, pediatricians should be cognizant of the presentation of this uncommon condition. PubMed, Eur J Med Res. (Also see Localized Scleroderma: Linear and Juvenile Scleroderma)

Treatments for Generalized Morphea

Unilateral generalized morphea (UMG) is a rare variant of localized scleroderma. Treatment with combined low-dose methotrexate and pulsed high-dose corticosteroid therapy might represent a promising treatment option for UGM. PubMed, Eur J Med Res, [2006].

Causes of Generalized Morphea

The causes of generalized morphea, morphea scleroderma, and systemic scleroderma are largely unknown, although sometimes they are known to be caused by environmental toxins, genetics, or medications, etc. (Also see Causes of Morphea and Causes of Systemic Scleroderma.)

Personal Stories of Generalized Morphea

Ang: Morphea and Fibromyalgia I was diagnosed with morphea in February 2002, but had this for a year prior to that without knowing exactly what the diagnosis was…

Kathy: Generalized Morphea Scleroderma I finally pressured another doctor for a referral to a dermatologist and had a biopsy done and was finally told morphea scleroderma…

Katie: Morphea I developed morphea on my lower abdomen around the time I was twelve years old…

Kristy C: Generalized Morphea The only place where I do not have any morphea is my face, which I am very thankful for…

Maggie M: Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus and Generalized Morphea I had to seek medical help when I realized that it was spreading and getting considerably worse…

Tami: Morphea Scleroderma I have gotten used to the stares everyone casts my way because in their eyes I am different. Unique, I guess…

Each of the Voices of Scleroderma books includes an entire chapter of morphea scleroderma personal stories, as well as articles by leading scleroderma experts.

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