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Joelf

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  1. Insights into myofibroblasts and their activation in scleroderma: opportunities for therapy? This review outlines the increasing complexity of the biological processes that leads to the appearance of the myofibroblast in normal functions and in diseased tissues. PubMed, Curr Opin Rheumatol, 07/31/2018. (Also see Fibroblasts) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  2. Joelf

    Concerned about a skin formation on face

    Hi Marysue, Welcome to these forums! I'm sorry to hear that you've been suffering with scleroderma for such a long time. Morphea usually begins as patches of yellowish or ivory-colored rigid, dry skin. These then become hard, slightly depressed, oval-shaped plaques which usually have a whitish or yellowish center surrounded by a pinkish or purplish halo. Please note that I have no medical training, but whilst it is possible that this new skin problem on your face could relate to a new morphea patch, particularly as you have had this before, it could also be totally unrelated to morphea and be caused by something completely different. This is one of the problems with a complex disease such as scleroderma; it's easy to assume that because the disease is already present, any other symptoms automatically relate to it and it can blind one to any other illnesses which can have nothing to do with it. I would therefore suggest that you go to your primary doctor, with a view to obtaining a referral to a dermatologist, who is the best person to advise you of the best method of treating this new skin problem. Should it subsequently turn out to be caused by scleroderma, then a referral to a listed scleroderma expert would be your next move. Kind regards,
  3. Joelf

    Recently Diagnosed with CREST.

    Hi Tough as Nails, Welcome to these forums! I'm sorry to hear that you've recently been diagnosed with limited scleroderma (aka CREST) and appear to have received such a worrying prognosis. Although you're suffering kidney and lung involvement, as each case of scleroderma is different, it's very difficult to speculate exactly how the disease will progress (I have lung involvement and thankfully have lived considerably longer than 6 months to a year since I was diagnosed! ) We do recommend that our members, if possible, consult a listed scleroderma expert, as such a complex disease as scleroderma requires specialist knowledge and expertise, in order to be diagnosed and treated correctly. Kind regards,
  4. How People With Type 2 Diabetes Can Lower Their Risk of Health Problems. A growing number of studies suggest that getting a handle on a few key risk factors can bring type 2 diabetes under control. Time Healthland, 08/15/2018. (Also see Prevention of Diabetes) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  5. Expression of interleukin-18 in muscle tissue of patients with polymyositis or dermatomyositis and effects of conventional immunosuppressive treatment. IL-18 is highly expressed in muscle tissue in the context of inflammatory myopathies and based on its plausible effector functions could provide a novel therapeutic target in future. PubMed, Rheumatology (Oxford), 08/08/2018. (Also see Treatments for Dermatomyositis and Polymyositis and Interleukins) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  6. Joelf

    Hi guys, Newly diagnosed and confused.

    Hi Jan, Welcome to these forums! I'm sorry to hear that you've had worrying blood tests and a scary consultation from a rheumatologist who has such a gloomy and pessimistic outlook. No wonder you're feeling a bit worried! Please note that I have no medical knowledge apart from a now out of date first aid certificate, which is not much use, unless I should come across someone with a broken leg, or some such minor injury. However, I would reiterate the advice we always give regarding blood tests; whilst a useful tool to help to obtain the full picture, they are by no means conclusive or the be all and end all of a diagnosis and it is possible to have positive blood tests and yet never go on to develop the full blown disease and vice versa, as many of our members can testify. Far more important are the clinical signs and symptoms of the disease. Of course without second sight it's impossible for me (and your rheumatologist, for that matter! ) to predict how the disease will pan out for you and quite frankly I would have been less than amused to have been given such a frightening chapter and verse of the possible progression of the disease, which may never come about. It might progress into lung and heart involvement, but by the same token, you might get run over by a bus, or some other eventuality! Certainly, whilst being aware of the unpleasant side of scleroderma, I feel that your rheumatologist was jumping the gun somewhat, particularly as the symptoms of lung and heart involvement weren't actually present at that time. We do recommend that our members, if possible, consult a listed scleroderma expert, as such a complex disease does require specialist knowledge and expertise, which is often beyond the scope of the average rheumatologist. As you're in the UK, perhaps it may be possible for you to obtain a referral to The Royal Free Hospital; I'm a patient there myself and they are experts at dealing with the idiosyncrasies of scleroderma. They are really the best people to determine any further tests you may need. Just to put things into perspective for you, I have had lung involvement for the past ten years and have no intention of dying in the near future, if only to make sure I get my money's worth from my pensions! ) Kind regards,
  7. High Prevalence of Antithyroid Antibodies (ATAs) in a New Zealand Cohort of Patients With Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). There is a higher prevalence of ATAs in SSc and Ssc– overlap syndrome compared with the general population and screening these patients for ATAs is a reasonable measure. PubMed, J Clin Rheumatol, 2018 Aug;24(5):264-271. (Also see Antibodies and Thyroid Diseases) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  8. This May Be the Secret to Feeling Younger and Living Longer. New research points to a way to keep that youthful state of mind, at least for elderly adults: feel in control. Time Healthland, 08/13/2018. This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  9. Adipokine interactions promote the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Adipokines levels and associated clinical manifestations suggest involvement of adipokines in disease pathogenesis of SLE. PubMed, Cytokine, 2018 Aug 8;111:20-27. Also see Research on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  10. The International Scleroderma Network thanks Gilead for their sponsorship support. Posted 09/14/2018.
  11. Evaluation of Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Associated Factors in Patients With Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Vitamin B12 deficiency is frequent in SSc and has multiple causes and all patients should be monitored for Vitamin B12 deficiency. PubMed, J Clin Rheumatol, 2018 Aug;24(5):250-254. (Also see Supplement Guide for Systemic Scleroderma) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  12. Child passive smoking 'increases chronic lung risk'. Non–smoking adults have a higher risk of dying from serious lung disease if they grew up with parents who smoked, according to US research. BBC Health News, 08/19/2018. This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  13. In loving memory of Carlos Forney a donation was made by Nancy Wyzinski to the nonprofit International Scleroderma Network. (Also see Sclero Shop/Donate) Posted 09/11/2018. This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  14. Progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus rheumatoid arthritis: the impact of low disease activity. Plaque progression is accelerated in SLE regardless of disease activity, and is associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and the Systemic Coronary Risk Evaluation. PubMed, Rheumatology (Oxford), 08/08/2018. (Also see Antibodies in Lupus) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  15. Joelf

    Watermelon Stomach (GAVE)

    Hi Brigid, The number of replies refers to the replies received throughout the entire thread. It can be a bit confusing until you get used to posting (I was a complete Luddite until I began working for the ISN! ) I do hope you will enjoy being a member of our community and please do let me know if you need any help using the Forums. Kind regards,
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