Chopper

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Posts posted by Chopper


  1. I have always enjoyed healthy food, so when I was forced to remove gluten, then later forced to have a low-fat, low-fiber diet, it didn't seem "too far" of a stretch since I love a challenge. I'm a positive person most of the time and I have remained positive most of the time. However, I thought I could make cookies, gluten free of course, since I hadn't tried making them in a few months. I recall how gluten free flours sometimes absorb more moisture, so in my first pan I lessened the flour, and they failed. I added more flour for the remaining cookies that turned out great. I scraped the failed, crumbly, flat cookies onto a paper plate for the kids to eat. On my lunch break today, as I was working in the kitchen, I kept snagging some cookie crumbs...mmmmmm...delicious. I get back to work (6 minute drive) and I get sick. Can't handle the fat content. Horrible tummy pains. For a couple hours I'm miserable.

     

    I have an afternoon/evening of weepiness. Weepy because something made me sick. Weepy because I try to stay strong, and occasionally I have a weak moment. Weepy because I had a brainstorm idea of low fat low fiber gluten free granola bars made with new gluten free cereals with dried mango and apples and bananas, but our local "big box store's" dried fruit contains "traces of gluten" and I cannot in good conscience buy them....argh. Weepy because of stuff like that! Why would fruit even have to be exposed to gluten?! autoimmune illnesses......argh! So here's a whine, if allowed on the this structured, educational site, to all of us who have eating issues! Whaaaaaaaaaaa! Here's to those of us who have loved ones who say they have empathy for us but truly don't know how occasionally it can be down-right saddening and frustrating to make diet changes!

     

    There are foods out there for us different folk, that are wonderful to have and we need to be reminded of how wonderful they are, and simply move on to more important issues.

     

    Chopper


  2. Congrats! I thought I had congratulated you earlier, but either the post never got published or I dreamt it! Thank you for the effort and sacrifice of time you give to us. It is greatly appreciated!!! It's so nice to have a connection to others who are so willing to give of their time to try to encourage and help others. Again, thank you.

     

    Chopper


  3. Since there was not much response, I feel as though my lightbulb moment wasn't really one. I'm just grasping for a reason and hoping someone else would know. I'll just mention the pain in my fingertips to the rheumatologist on my next visit and see if they have any clue.

     

    It's a similar situation to how I couldn't sleep on my left side for the last couple years because I would wake with pain behind my left breast. No one seemed to care at the doctors office. So I just deal with it and try not to sleep on my left side. Well, since I've been diagnosed with gastroparesis, and the worsening of it causes so much upper GI gas, I am suspicious that the pain behind my left breast when I sleep on my left side is due to a build up of gas. No one has confirmed that, but it would be nice to know. :emoticon-dont-know:

     

    Thanks,

    Chopper


  4. My doctor told me that the colors can happen in different sequences, and maybe some people won't go through all the color changes. For me, currently, my fingers and palms go white, except the tips go brilliant red and my nails go blue. I've seen pictures online of people with one blue finger, one white one, etc., but I haven't experienced the blue finger yet! LOL! Thank goodness I've learned here more about Raynaud's, otherwise that might freak...me....out!

     

    Keep warm! Chopper


  5. I recall a post I made awhile back where I mentioned painful finger tips and I didn't know what was going on. It had been a couple months since I had one and I had two this week. The first was my thumb. It hurt to type, to bump, it throbbed, and I truly didn't know why. Lasted about 4 days. Then next to it, my index had a little hangnail, which I snipped. It didn't think I went low, I just simply, snipped it off. Well now my index fingertip is all red and swollen and tender. My lightbulb moment is that these painful fingertips I'm getting are when, somehow, a cuticle gets damaged. Before this year, I never experienced this type of thing, but it was this past winter that I developed Raynaud's, so this must connected. Is this true? Does Raynaud's cause this sensitivity to happen to your nails? Do any of you experience this too?

     

    Chopper


  6. Hello!

     

    My thyroid level is now down within normal range as well as Vitamin D level. I would imagine I can attribute my increased level of energy, better sleep, and no more random muscle pains to that! Yay!

     

    The young rheumatologist that I recently saw (my first visit since the initial visit and positive bloodwork 3 months ago), was at a lupus center and she will be moving to a scleroderma center in Pittsburgh under Dr. Medsger who I understand is a guru on sclero but will be retiring soon. She invited me to follow her and of course I said yes! Telangiectasias around mouth/face were noted, Raynaud's noted, a couple of puckering fingertips were noted. GI troubles noted. I asked if she thought my gastroparesis was connected to sclero. She said she didn't know. I'll ask that again when I see her with Dr. Medsger.

     

    Just saw the GI doctor. I had lost a couple more pounds in last 3 months and experimented going without EryPed200 for my gastroparesis a couple times, only to prove it helps me and I want to continue taking it, especially since I see it worsening. I asked him about the timeline of my GI trouble: 1 1/2 years of gallbladder pain, onset of gastroparesis and gastritis as gallbladder worsened, constipation, and gastroparesis worsening since it's onset last summer. Did he think it could be connected to sclero? He doesn't think so since I don't seem to have esophageal involvement. This still puzzles me. The gallbladder is gone, didn't need much pain meds for it, I'm gluten free, I'm on omeprazole, why would the gastroparesis worsen for no reason?

     

    Oh well. At least I'm feeling well and managing it.

     

    Well wishes to all!

     

    Chopper


  7. Hi Miocean! What a bummer you are bed ridden and all that is going along with that! However, how nice that you can be connected to us to chat! Hopefully that will help the time fly by faster! Hope you are feeling better soon!

     

    Chopper


  8. Hi! What a great topic! I'm a firm believer that everyone needs a hobby! I think I can relate, I love hobbies, and I have varied ones over the years, even rubber stamping. My latest hobby is perennials. I can't get enough. I think of it as rescuing them! My last hobby was photography. What a wonderful hobby that was, and still occasionally is! You know what, any hobby can become something that you can give and share with others. Something I learned about myself was with each hobby I tried, it was more fun when shared with others. Before photography I got into making archival giclee prints. I love sharing that with others. Since photography went along with giclees, people started asking me to do photography for them. How rewarding that is! I joined Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep (infant bereavement photography), but to this day have only received one call, which is good. Now that I'm moving into perennnials, again, what a great thing to share. Keep the seeds from those that make them, start them during winter, and give the baby plants away in the spring. How exciting! Share your bulbs when they multiply. Share your roots when then spread. My suggestion is, whatever hobby you choose, share it. I think it's built into us that sharing is rewarding and brings true joy, which we all need, especially those of us with challenges. Have fun!


  9. Shelley,

     

    I enjoyed your response.

     

    Tammy,

     

    I love watering my gardens too! It's therapeutic! Here's one idea if you're using a nozzle that you have to squeeze, buy a metal nozzle that screws open/close to control the stream. That way it won't take as much effort and you can even loop it over your arm and steady the nozzle with your other hand. Happy gardening! I love this time of year too!

     

    Chopper


  10. I have to laugh at myself because there I was asking you if chocolate bothers you and then saying it doesn't bother me. However, I usually eat it in small doses. While shopping yesterday I couldn't resist the urge to eat a whole chocolate/caramel bar, and guess what, stomach issues all evening! Guess I have to eat my words, and hopefully they won't cause a gastroparesis attack!

     

    How have you been feeling?


  11. My heart aches for you!!! You've been given some good advice, and I hope seeking out that procedure gives you some much needed relief!

     

    I have gastroparesis and I try to follow the gastroparesis diet closely too. Does chocolate and hot drinks bother you or did you read that they might? I realize everyone with gastroparesis is different, but personally neither of those bother me, that I can tell, however I only drink 1 or 2 cups of hot 'herbal' tea a day, and when I eat chocolate it's dark and in small doses. For example, 1 or 2 individually wrapped pieces of dark chocolate a day, or I'll put chocolate chips in my pumpkin muffins. To help get my chocolate fix, I also make chocolate muffins with cocoa that contain pureed beets (you'd never know beets were in there!). Any way to cram nutrition into easy-to-digest muffins! I can't live without that staple in my life! You can even pour milk over one to help if needed. I think the grocery store has a hard time keeping muffin papers in stock for me! As far as the constipation, I take magnesium every day without fail which greatly helps me. Before I started taking it, I was going every 3-5 days! Now it's usually every day, but if not, then 2 days.

     

    I nearly forgot to mention, a gentle walk after each meal, if you can handle it, is very helpful because in this case gravity is our friend. Not so much on our aging faces (lol), but our GI system LOVES gravity and gentle motion!

     

     

     

    Keep us posted!

    Chopper


  12. Hi Miocean,

     

    That was interesting to read through your post and your ups and downs with things. 2-3 years ago when I was taking my son to the same pediatrician I went to, as I was leaving I was handed an envelope with my old medical records and was told they were purging. I didn't have to take them, but of course I did. I wanted to look through them! So that's an interesting question of how long places hold on to your files. I didn't think it was possible to personally retain the results of every test, and I have 'assumed' the doctor would keep everything. Now, however, in the last few months I've gone from having one doctor to changing from a family doctor to an internist and adding 4 more specialists, I really wonder lately about how the whole picture will be formed! How active do I need to be in my medical records? That sounds like a good topic for discussion!

     

    So glad you're don't need oxygen! Look forward to the next post.

     

    Chopper


  13. The biggest things that have helped me with gastroparesis, is eating smaller portions, low fat, and low fiber, and for me also gluten and dairy free. Thank goodness for the internet in this department because I didn't know what low fiber truly meant, and believe it or not, my GI doctor had no info for me! hmph! I found a couple websites that gave lists of what you can eat and what you shouldn't. I found a dietitian online that specializes in gastroparesis and what a help she was too. It's a challenge, but with forethought and preparation, I have been able to do well with it and still eat fairly healthy. I have also found that some days are bad and some days aren't so bad, with no way to predict it. I had two really bad days in a row, then yesterday I had some relief. Yay!