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Found 17 results

  1. Usefulness of composite indices in the assessment of joint involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients: correlation with ultrasonographic score. We suggest the ability of composite indices in detecting SLE joint inflammation and their possible real–life use. PubMed, Lupus, 2019 Feb 11:961203319828527. (Also see Symptoms and Complications of Lupus) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  2. Incidence and predictors of aorta calcification in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Systemic lupus erythematosus patients had a much earlier onset and higher incidences of aorta calcium than coronary artery calcification. PubMed, Lupus, 2019 Feb 10:961203319826689. (Also see Symptoms and Complications of Lupus) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  3. Association of Depression With Risk of Incident Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) in Women Assessed Across 2 Decades. This study contributes to increasing evidence that depression may be associated with increased risk of SLE. PubMed, JAMA Psychiatry, 2018 Dec 1;75(12):1225-1233. (Also see Symptoms and Complications of Lupus and Depression) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  4. The risks of cancer development in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients: a systematic review and meta–analysis. This comprehensive meta–analysis provides epidemiological evidence supporting the associations between SLE and cancer risk. BMC Journals, Arthritis Research & Therapy, 12/06/2018. (Also see Symptoms and Complications of Lupus and Cancer) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  5. Relationship between interstitial CD34 positive cells and active phase of lupus nephritis. A strong interstitial expression of CD34 was observed in lower activity indices and it could play a protective role in lupus nephritis and could reduce renal activity. PubMed, Eur J Rheumatol, 2018 Oct 10:1-4. (Also see Symptoms and Complications of Lupus) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  6. Hi! I’m Amber 33 and new to the forum. My symptoms started with numbness and tingling in my hands and arms along with extreme stiffness and weakness in my hands. My doctors thought it was carpal tunnel but it didn’t make sense seeing how I had been a stay at home mom for ten years prior. Afterwards, my hands began to swell, my hip started becoming sore, I had this strange bruise type rash that wouldn’t go away down my leg, and my shoulders began keeping me up at night. My mother passed with leukemia around this time and things got even worse. My neck would pain me constantly and felt as though I couldn’t turn it. Like I had a constant crick in my neck. The rash also spread down to my calf and I began feeling a dip in my back side near the rash. My doctor sent me to a dermatologist and a rheumatologist. The dermatologist did a biopsy that came back as morphea or scleroderma. The rheumatologist told me that he thought it was morphea and an unspecified autoimmune. My ANA came back positive as well. He said I leaned more towards lupus then anything, but still didn’t hit some of the main characteristics of the disease. At first he put me on vitamin D and plaquenil but after a couple of months it had only gotten worse. He then decided to add methotrexate but also gave me a 6 week supply of prednisone that made every pain go away. It didn’t take away all of the swelling in my hands but I felt great. I had been given it once before for an upper respiratory infection and knew it would help and now that it has ended, I’m really not sure if the methotrexate has helped or if it’s just taken some time to slowly return since I discontinued the steroids. It’s been about three months since I quit the steroids and it’s just slowly gotten worse. The doctor seemed to think the methotrexate was helping, but that I needed to up the dose from 6 pills a week to 8. Then I received a call from them the next day saying my liver enzymes were elevated and that I needed to stay at 6 until my next visit in three months. I guess I’m just really looking for some advice on what to expect. Or to maybe find someone who has had a similar journey. I’m curious why they didn’t want me to lower my dosage if my liver enzymes were elevated. I don’t understand why he ruled out systemic scleroderma - not that I was hoping for that diagnosis by no means, but it seems possible. If I have to be taken off the methotrexate, what’s my next option? He said morphea can cause fat atrophy and he thinks that’s what's happened on my back side. Will that get worse? Why in this world are steroids so bad if they make you feel so good?! I’ve been dealing with this for about a year and a half now and I don’t really feel like I’ve made any great progress. Any advice would be very much appreciated.
  7. I am going to look for where a group of people lost a friend to lupus. On January 23rd they are have a bone marrow donation drive. I think that is a great thing and I saw the story on KTIV news station 4. I will look it up a little later.
  8. Hello. I am a female and 62 years old. I recently had a positive ANA and am just looking for information while waiting 3 months before I can see the rheumatologist. My ANA was 1:32 and in the comments it says anti-centromere pattern observed. A few of my search results lead me here, so I joined hoping to learn as much as possible. Two years ago my dermatologist requested that I have an ANA test because of the (as she described it) "red butterfly rash" on my face. I thought I had rosacea, but she said it is not. I tested negative. At the follow up visit she told me that did not mean I do not have Lupus, and wanted me to have another test in 6 months. 2 years later and the rash no longer comes and goes, it seems it is here to stay. She also says other signs she is seeing on my skin, hair, and nails may also point to Lupus. I have other symptoms on the Lupus list, but had explained them away with possible other causes. Because of the anti-centromere pattern comment on my report, I have researched the symptoms of CREST and Scleroderma. I do not have any of the listed symptoms other than achy joints and muscles, and tiredness. Reading many threads here, I understand that definitive answers may be a long way down the road. I am sure the Rheumatologist will order additional tests that will hopefully provide a little more insight. Since my doctor and dermatologist seem to think I have Lupus, I am wondering how the anti-centromere pattern fits into that diagnosis. Your input and words of wisdom are appreciated.
  9. Hello, I am new to this forum. I’ve had Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) for over a decade, but was recently diagnosed with systemic sclerosis. FYI: Prior to “starting a new topic” I ran a search on “lupus SLE and sceloderma overlap” and it came up with zero results. Wondering if anyone out there is in the same predicament. Thank you in advance for any input.
  10. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the setting of scleroderma (SSc) is different than in the setting of lupus: A review. This review highlights the differences between SSc–PAH and Lupus–PAH. PubMed, Respir Med, 2018 Jan;134:42-46. (Also see Pulmonary Hypertension) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  11. Olfactory function in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). A longitudinal study and review of the literature. Both SLE and SSc patients with longstanding disease had significant reduction in all stages of the Sniffin' Sticks test (TDI) that maintained stable over a 2–year period. PubMed, Autoimmun Rev, 02/11/2018. (Also see Lupus in Overlap and Brain Involvement) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  12. Predicting and managing primary and secondary non-response to rituximab using B-cell biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus. Treatment with anti–CD20 agents can be guided by B-cell monitoring and should aim to achieve complete depletion. PubMed, Ann rheumatologist Dis, 07/06/2017. (Also see Treatments for Lupus and B Cells and T Cells) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  13. Disseminated cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection complicating active treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: an emerging problem. Given the rise in prevalence of CMV, there is a need for appropriate screening for this opportunistic pathogen and studies to determine the risks and benefits of prophylactic or preemptive treatment for this virus. PubMed, Lupus, 10/04/2016. (Also see Symptoms and Complications of Lupus) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  14. Impact of heart rate variability (HRV), a marker for cardiac health, on lupus disease activity. Impaired HRV, particularly the low frequency to high frequency ratio, is associated with lupus disease activity and several cytokines related to interferons type II and tumor necrosis factor pathways. PubMed, Arthritis Res Ther, 2016 Sep 2;18(1):197. (Also see Symptoms and Complications of Lupus) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  15. Myelitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: clinical characteristics and effect in accrual damage. A single–center experience. Myelitis is associated with a significant increase in accrual damage compared with severe non–neuropsychiatric manifestations. PubMed, Lupus, 08/01/2016. (Also see Symptoms and Complications of Lupus) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  16. Prevalence, severity, and clinical features of acute (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. There were significant differences in the clinical manifestations of AP and CP and patients with severe AP were found to have a higher incidence of concomitant infection and serum triglyceride levels. PubMed, Rheumatol Int, 07/05/2016. (Also see Pancreatitis and Lupus in Overlap and Complications) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  17. Urinary dedifferentiated podocytes as a non-invasive biomarker of lupus nephritis (LN). Urinary dedifferentiated podocytes were shown in active LN, and their protein levels correlated with proteinuria and histological features in LN. PubMed, Nephrol Dial Transplant, 02/29/2016. (Also see Symptoms and Complications of Lupus) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
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