Jump to content
Sclero Forums

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'reflux'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Worldwide
    • Welcome: Guidelines and FAQs
    • Sclero Forums (MAIN)
    • UK Scleroderma
    • News
    • Personal Support

Blogs

  • CFM Babs from Chorley FM
  • barefut impressions
  • My Two Cents...
  • Amanda Thorpe's Blog
  • Joelf's Blog
  • Michael Thorpe's Blog

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Location

Found 7 results

  1. Case Report: Total gastrectomy in systemic scleroderma when anti-reflux surgery is not viable. We suggest an open gastrectomy with roux-en-Y anastomosis as an alternative to the Nissen fundoplication for patients with connective tissue disease. PubMed, Int J Surg Case Rep. (Also see Reflux (Heartburn) Prevention and Treatments) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  2. The impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in scleroderma (SSc): effects on sleep quality. Future studies should examine mechanisms underlying nocturnal GERD symptoms in SSc patients, and the impact of improved GERD symptom control on sleep quality. PubMed, Dis Esophagus, 01/31/2019. (Also see Reflux (Heartburn) and GERD and Sleep Disorders) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  3. Surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with systemic sclerosis. Laparoscopic Roux–en–Y gastric bypasses as an anti–reflux procedure is safe and may provide an alternative to fundoplication in the treatment of GERD for systemic sclerosis patients with esophageal dysmotility. PubMed, Surg Endosc, 02/12/2018. (Also see Reflux (Heartburn) Prevention and Treatments) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  4. Bidirectional association between fibromyalgia (FM) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): two population–based retrospective cohort analysis. The present study suggests a bidirectional relationship between FM and GERD and there is a greater risk of developing GERD for patients with FM than developing FM for patients with GERD. PubMed, Pain, 2017 Oct;158(10):1971-1978. (Also see Fibromyalgia and Reflux (Heartburn) and GERD) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  5. How to Help Ease Your Heartburn. What exactly is heartburn? It occurs when the acidic contents of your stomach back up, or reflux, into the esophagus and cause pain and a burning feeling. Times Healthland, 03/20/2017. (Also see Reflux (Heartburn) Prevention and Treatments) This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.
  6. Hi All Just wondering if any of you experience worse reflux while exercising? Every time I work out lately, it really sends my reflux into a tither. I walk on a nordic ski machine one day and walk only on a treadmill (no running) the next time. I alternate these two exercises so that I exercise every other day. It's not like I'm doing scrunches or anything strenuous that puts my stomach in a knot. I've been doing these workouts for about 21 years without prior reflux problems until the last few months. Now, on the other side of the coin, my reflux has also been worse lately. Curious, does anyone have any thoughts as to why it might be so bothersome for what I'm calling somewhat mild exercise? Wondering if it could just simply be because my reflux is getting worse perhaps...
  7. Hi everyone, I have been ill for 4 months with reflux oesophagitis which did not respond to medical therapy. Following an OGD I was diagnosed with Barrett's with multiple erosions. Due to a long wait for investigations and treatment and the fact of having pre-cancerous cells (Barrets). I opted to pay privately abroad. I found an excellent surgeon who spoke good English and specialised in upper gastro-intestinal surgery. I underwent oesophageal manometry which showed a hypotonic lower oesophageal sphincter (normal pressure is 10-15mm, mine was 2). Basically the sphincter between my oesophagus and stomach was not working which caused constant acid to wash up which is the reason for my problems. I had a laparoscopic nissen fundoplication 2 weeks ago (they wrap the top part of the stomach around the oesophageal sphincter to strengthen it). During my post-op check I discussed with the surgeon about scleroderma. He told me that reflux disease is usually a chronic disease (I'm only 48) but mine came on very quickly/aggressively and did not respond to medical therapy. He advised me to mention it to my general practitioner and be investigated. He said that scleroderma is known to affect the oesophageal sphincter. After reading up on scleroderma I found that a lot of things 'fell into place' for me. I haven't felt 100% for about a 18 months now, nothing dramatic, just little things that were different. I think my first symptom was cold intolerance (over the last 2 winters, hands and feet cold which I put down to smoking but also feeling generally unwell after being out in the cold and taking ages to warm up.I have also experienced tiredness, extreme at times, which I put down to a busy job doing 12 hour shifts. I used to be able to do 5-6 shifts in a row without problem but I have struggles with two shifts in the last year. I was diagnosed with an ulnar neuropathy (numbness and weakness in 2 fingers of my left hand) quite a few years back. I had nerve tests and the neurologist told me I had damaged a nerve in my elbow and that it would take 3-4 months to heal. He put it down to sleeping in a funny position. This happens to me 2-3 times a year and takes ages to clear up. I have never followed this up and have just learned to live with it. I have also developed skin dryness over the last 2 years, particularly on my face and it can get quite flakey despite daily moisturising. Since January of this year I have had other symptoms that I have been to my general practitioner with. I developed a brown mark on my cheek which I though was a new mole and it is growing (now 1 x 1cm). My mum had one in exactly the same place and hers grew to the size of a 50p. She had it for 3 years and it disappeared this year. I also developed a lesion on my inner lower lip (blue/purple)in April, My general practitioner said it wasn't cancer and that we should 'watch and wait'. The lesion is still there (3 x 3mm) and hasn't changed or got any bigger. I have noticed my finger nails have changed in the last year, very fragile with lines running across them (from base to the tip). When I cut my nails they are sore for a few days (this is something new in the last 6 months). I have also noticed hard flat lumps 1cm on the top of the lower part of my fingers in the last 6 months (they don't hurt). They disappeared 2 months ago but came back this week. I am due to see my general practitioner next Tuesday regarding my return to work. I am quite reluctant to present him with a 'shopping list' of vague symptoms, especially after having such a big operation. I am apprehensive thinking he will put it down me just being a hypochondriac. I have read that there isn't a test for scleroderma which also makes me believe that my general practitioner will not take me seriously. Any advice you can give me would be gratefully appreciated. Many thanks, earthblaze
×
×
  • Create New...