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Elvis

First lung function test (PFT) showed slightly reduced capacity

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Well today I had my first official test on my lungs after being diagnosed with Limited Scleroderma.

 

My lung function test showed that I have slightly reduced lung capacity. The nurse wouldn't say much more than that really. He just said that the results would be sent back to the rheumatologist.

 

Now I am wondering what happens next?

 

I wish now I'd asked more questions!

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Caz,

 

With a "slightly reduced lung capacity" I wouldn't worry about it. If it's serious, I would hope your rheumatologist or pulmonologist would get you ASAP. So as far as what happens next - relax, enjoy life and hear what your rheumatologist has to say on your next visit. Start making that list of questions now so you'll have them when you go.

 

By the way, I always ask for a copy whenever I get a pulmonary function test. I've never had a technician refuse. So next time, be sure to ask. It never hurts.


Janey Willis

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Assistant Webmaster

(Retired) ISN News Director

(Retired) ISN Technical Writer for Training Manuals

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Thanks Janey for putting my mind at rest. Good idea though about the list cos it's so true that you always forget to ask about something!

 

Take care.

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Hi Caz,

 

I'm sorry you have Limited Scleroderma and that your lung function test showed slightly reduced capacity. I know how scary this stuff can be, when we are first trying to learn the difference between what's very serious and what's not.

 

The good news about lung capacity is that we are born with about 80 percent or more capacity than we actually need. So our lungs can survive a huge amount of dysfunction before we're ever in such serious shape that we require meds or oxygen. Usually it is the long term (over years) trends that our medical team is concerned about, much more so than any individual test. Odds are fairly good that they will just shrug off this test result, considering it to be your baseline.

 

So I'm two thumbs up on Janey's advice, to not worry about it. And I endorse her idea to relax and enjoy life, and I'm super happy that your mind is already at rest.


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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