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Jeannie McClelland

Outcomes of Barrett’s oesophagus related to systemic sclerosis (SSc)

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Outcomes of Barrett’s oesophagus related to systemic sclerosis (SSc): a 3-year EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research prospective follow-up study. Barrett’s oesophagus (BE) is the major risk factor for oesophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Our results, in accordance with previous published data suggesting an increased risk of EAC or cardial adenocarcinoma in SSc, highlight the need for accurate follow-up of BE SSc patients at risk of developing adenocarcinoma. Julien Wipff, Rheumatology, March 16, 2011. (Also see: Barrett's Oesphagus)

 

This item was posted in the ISN Newsroom. Please check the newsroom daily for updates on scleroderma and other related articles.


Jeannie McClelland

(Retired) ISN Director of Support Services

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Manager

(Retired) ISN Blog Manager

(Retired) ISN Assistant News Guide

(Retired) ISN Artist

International Scleroderma Network

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This is very true as My Dad had Acid Reflux most of his life and developed Barrett's Esophagus which he never knew he had till it was too late( although he did not have SS), He developed Esophageal Cancer and died 5 years later. I have also had acid reflux for many years I can usually control it with Pepcid AC, I have been too scared to have the testing done to find out if the reflux has turned into Barrett's.

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I have a cousin, Marsha, who has Barrett's, but no autoimmune diseases on her side of the family and no symptoms of reflux other than a cough~ Another friend died of esophageal cancer, but again, no sclero or other autoimmune disease, but he did have awful GERD. Please, new friend, summon up the courage to have an endoscopy. They sound worse than they are and it could save your life. :emoticons-i-care:


Jeannie McClelland

(Retired) ISN Director of Support Services

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Manager

(Retired) ISN Blog Manager

(Retired) ISN Assistant News Guide

(Retired) ISN Artist

International Scleroderma Network

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I was just diagnosed with Barrett's esophagus this past December when an upper endoscopy revealed it. I take Lanzoprazole every day to keep the acid at bay. They also did 4 biopsies during my procedure and found "intestinal metaplasia" in my stomach and duodenum, but said I had "premalignant cells" at this time. It feels like a ticking time bomb.

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Lori, I'm really sorry to hear that. Although there are a lot of things about scleroderma that keep us waiting for the other shoe to drop, having the 'premalignant cells' diagnosis would be much worse. There is some about the C-word that scares the living daylights out of us. You are a good example of why it is important to summon up the nerve to have endoscopies and colonoscopies (to say nothing of the girl's best friend, the mammography) as and when recommended. I'll keep my fingers crossed for you. Thanks for posting in this topic.


Jeannie McClelland

(Retired) ISN Director of Support Services

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Manager

(Retired) ISN Blog Manager

(Retired) ISN Assistant News Guide

(Retired) ISN Artist

International Scleroderma Network

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Please, Marsha, get the scope. The worst part for me is not getting my morning coffee, :blink: and of course none of us like needles. I don't mind the nap and the juice and cookies afterwards, tee hee. In the many I have had, no ill effects afterwards other than maybe a little sore throat.

 

I had my first six years ago when I was first diagnosed, and was truly terrified when the Barrett's was positive. I was certain I was going to die. Soon. I'm still here obviously!!

 

Now I go yearly, and give advice to the nurses, anesthesiologist and anyone else who will listen about scleroderma, since so many are unfamiliar with it.

 

Nexium twice daily and being very, very careful of my diet have resulted in NO sign of Barrett's in several years. The increased risk will always be with me but so is the risk of stepping in front of a bus tomorrow.

 

My gastro doctor, who is THE sclero gastro guy in town, in fact he has an article on this site, tells me the chances are VERY small that they will develop into cancer. It's a very slow moving thing anyhow so getting checked and 'watchful waiting' are the way to go. Don't ignore it or be afraid of it, it will just become a vicious cycle and drive you crazy, which will make you ignore it more, and only make you more afraid.

 

Go to a knowledgeable and well connected gastro doctor, and he will lead you in the right direction. You may have to go on a lot of 'first dates' with doctors but don't just settle for someone, be strong in your conviction that you deserve the best. Ask lots of questions and if they seem unable or unwilllng to answer, or impatient, on to the next doctor.

 

Warm hugs, and your support is HERE. We've all been through this nasty stuff and more. This is an ugly disease with a lot of ugly manifestations, and my own way of handling it is to try to be prepared for whatever comes at me next, although I have no idea what that will be. I don't sit around waiting for it, but when it shows up I'm ready for it. I take a deep breath and make a game plan for dealing with it.

 

When I was first diagnosed I was terrified to meet other sclero patients, afraid of what I might see or hear.... now it's very comforting to know WE ARE NOT ALONE.

 

Best of luck and keep us informed, please!

Mary


Diffuse sclero; diabetes; hypertension; GERD with Barrett's

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Oh Mary, reading your post reminded me of so much...

 

I too had a dread of meeting other sclerodermians when first diagnosed which then became a real desire to meet them and having done so I haven't looked back!

 

It's great the way you have learned to live with Barrett's without letting it consume your every thought which is always a danger with the possibilities of any chronic illness can bring with it.

 

It's good to see you again, take care and keep posting.


Amanda Thorpe

ISN Sclero Forums Senior Support Specialist

ISN Video Presentations Manager

ISN Blogger

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Assistant Manager

(Retired) ISN Email Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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