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night owl

Runner Bean problems this time

28 posts in this topic

For the first time I have grow runner bean plants from a bean. Each plant has been circulated with slug pellets but the leaves have holes in them the leaves are not eaten from the outside. Does anyone know what pest is eating my runner bean plants? Does anyone have ideas how to stop this?

 

Gil

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Hi Gil,

 

Sadly I'm not much of a gardener, although I do like the garden to look reasonably tidy, so I can't advise you about your runner beans.

 

However, I do have an acquaintance who is a very keen gardener and grows all her own fruit and vegetables to the point of self sufficiency and I may see her this week so I'll put your query to her and see what she can advise.

 

Would it be any use spraying the leaves with a general pest killer?


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I read somewhere that you can spray your plants with washing up liquid (the stuff you use for doing the dishes), mixed with some water and spray onto the plants. It is supposed to stop all kinds of pests. I have been using it on my tomatoes and strawberries and so far it seems to be working. It also is not a harsh chemical so more economically friendly!

 

Cheers

Jean

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Hi Gil,

 

I spoke to one of my neighbours who is a very keen gardener and she suggested that it could be caterpillars as you've put down slug pellets and slugs were her first thought. She was saying that runner beans do require a lot of water and as it's been so dry, that could make the problem worse. She also said it's quite unusual to get holes in the leaves such as you've described? :emoticon-dont-know:

 

She said that really the only way to get rid of the caterpillars is to spray the leaves throughly; I'm not sure if you would want to spray the plants with chemicals though. I've heard of Jean's idea of washing up liquid before so that's probably worth a try first.

 

I hope this helps! :)


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Hi All

 

The holes in the runner bean leaves have not got any worse but the detergent spray is at hand.

 

This is my first year with trying veg on a very small scale, a few pots a few plants between the herbaceous border far from being self sufficient.

 

I am looking forward to eating the first crop of runner beans and I am also feeling proud I managed to grow some salad leaves which were very tasty probably because they were home grown.

 

Will I grow some veg next year don’t know as my potatoes have blight.

 

Happy gardening

 

Gil

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Don't give up Gil! We've been growing some stuff since last year with varying results, tomatoes were a real success, my herbs...not so much. Home grown stuff is so much more tasty.

 

We have a roving pest that regularly visits our garden...our pusscat! She has decided that she must...well er...business in anything with mud in it that my husband tries to grow. He even put some things under a type of cloth tunnel for protection but she sleeps in it instead! It's so funny to watch her stroll across the garden making a beeline for any new pot to do her business in. Good thing we adore her!

 

Take care.


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Gil, I was watching the prelude to Chelsea Flower Show on the television this morning and one of the gardeners recommended cooking a clove of garlic, straining the juice from it and then spraying her plants with the juice to kill pests? :emoticon-dont-know:

 

I must admit it sounds rather a palaver to me; however, if your pests are persistant it might be worth a try, if you can be bothered! ;)


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Hi

 

I am keeping the washing up liquid and garlic in reserve if things get worse. I like the idea of being pesticide free but gave in with the potatoes.

 

When it comes to cats we don’t have a kitty but everyone down the street seems to have one, all different colours, some more fluffy, some not and one has three legs who manages to jump up the fence without any problems puts me to shame but most just walk through yet there is always one!

 

My Mum was a great believer in Tagetes the common Marigold to keep cats off the garden. I might give them a try next year.

 

Gil

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My grandfather always planted a line of Marigolds around his garden, not only do they help with cats, but they are supposed to keep certain pests away as well. He never had much trouble with things eating his plants, so it must of done something. He had a VERY large dog, so that may be why no cats though!

 

Jean

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Hi Jean

 

I think I might pass on the large dog.

 

Marigolds here I come.

 

Gil

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Yeah me too, at the moment my garden is just a few pots with my tomatoes and beans in them, but if I had the space I would do the merigolds!

 

Jean

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Well this is the worst year I have had with runners .I have planted them 4 times; at last they are up. .And flowering very very late.

 

They really should be over, but I've got 4 bags into the freezer. I think the last 2 years were bad years. Here's a tip... plant a little later, May/June. Start elsewhere like start in pots the green house .Plenty of muck at the bottom with good compost/soil and well fed and they won't grow beans if they're dry; they like lots of water .Plant something the bees like near the flowers. If the bees are not doing the work then spray with a mist of honey and water .

 

Lots of water down to roots and hope for the best,

 

Christine.

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It turned out to be a good year for beans but there are just so many you can eat, freeze and give away. Next year - not so may plants.

 

It was also a good year for plums, apples and tomatoes

 

Something different for next year I think, but what?

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I am coming in to this thread pretty late I know but in fact, for us, planting season is just about upon us again.

 

I am hoping we can dig over the vege patch next weekend.

 

The trouble I have had with runner beans for the past 2 seasons is what we call vegetable shield beetle. They are either black or green shield shape with spots on their backs. The first year (3 years ago) I got a great crop of beautiful beans and just towards the end the beetles got stuck in and ruined the rest.

 

Since then the beetles have arrived with the flowers. Almost as though they have put us in their calendar for a free feast!! I guess I will have to use some sort of insecticide but I don't really want to because of the need to conserve our bee populations.

 

Do any of you bean experts have any tips I might be able to use?

 

Judy T

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Veg and bugs just seem to go together. I'm going try beans again this year and hope - no holes in the leaves this time.

 

I am still keeping garlic and washing up liquid in reserve. I'm going to plant Marigolds though.

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Ooh, I do hope you have success with your beans and your other veg. this year, Night Owl.

 

If all else fails, at least you might have a crop of prize winning Marigolds!! ;) :lol:


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Hey - it's wonderful you're growing runner beans. Holes, bugs and marigolds are all, in their way, good. But I'll go with large dogs anytime.


Kay Tee

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Planted the beans for this year in pots, outside in March in the warm but no sign as yet they are going to grow. Is this going to be a year without runner beans?

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Me I am a bit of a gardener, I like to grow veg. But don't laugh it's all in the back garden and the back garden is a town house garden; very small, what was a lawn it's raised beds . My broad beans are taller then me and I have potatoes in very large flowers nearly as tall as me.

Last year we were eating veg out of the garden but this year the bedding plants are not out fully yet as it's been a bad year .

But this morning I stuffed my hand down by the side of the spuds and yes, I have some. I got some up and cooked them but they did not have that 'wow' factor as they should have; maybe the weather has done something as the potato tops are strange. Anything that might do well is spuds everything else is no good.

My wrists are bad and hands are stiff so next year I think it will be mostly spuds I think as they are easy .Some of the soil is virgin to spuds except where I have grown them in my big raised bed .But I will get some chicken pellets in .Got some spuds in bags and some awful looking green house tomatoes growing under a plastic frame . :emoticons-line-dance: Christine :terrific:

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Hi, I am new to this site but I wondered if anyone has used anything that really does work to stop runner beans being eaten before they've had chance to get going.

 

Mine are about 4 inches tall and I keep spraying them with bug spray but no joy; has anyone used washing up liquid and if so does it work?

 

Help please.

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