night owl

Runner Bean problems this time

28 posts in this topic

Well this is the worst year I have had with runners .I have planted them 4 times; at last they are up. .And flowering very very late.

 

They really should be over, but I've got 4 bags into the freezer. I think the last 2 years were bad years. Here's a tip... plant a little later, May/June. Start elsewhere like start in pots the green house .Plenty of muck at the bottom with good compost/soil and well fed and they won't grow beans if they're dry; they like lots of water .Plant something the bees like near the flowers. If the bees are not doing the work then spray with a mist of honey and water .

 

Lots of water down to roots and hope for the best,

 

Christine.

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It turned out to be a good year for beans but there are just so many you can eat, freeze and give away. Next year - not so may plants.

 

It was also a good year for plums, apples and tomatoes

 

Something different for next year I think, but what?

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I am coming in to this thread pretty late I know but in fact, for us, planting season is just about upon us again.

 

I am hoping we can dig over the vege patch next weekend.

 

The trouble I have had with runner beans for the past 2 seasons is what we call vegetable shield beetle. They are either black or green shield shape with spots on their backs. The first year (3 years ago) I got a great crop of beautiful beans and just towards the end the beetles got stuck in and ruined the rest.

 

Since then the beetles have arrived with the flowers. Almost as though they have put us in their calendar for a free feast!! I guess I will have to use some sort of insecticide but I don't really want to because of the need to conserve our bee populations.

 

Do any of you bean experts have any tips I might be able to use?

 

Judy T

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Veg and bugs just seem to go together. I'm going try beans again this year and hope - no holes in the leaves this time.

 

I am still keeping garlic and washing up liquid in reserve. I'm going to plant Marigolds though.

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Ooh, I do hope you have success with your beans and your other veg. this year, Night Owl.

 

If all else fails, at least you might have a crop of prize winning Marigolds!! ;) :lol:


Jo Frowde

ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster

ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

ISN Hotline Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hey - it's wonderful you're growing runner beans. Holes, bugs and marigolds are all, in their way, good. But I'll go with large dogs anytime.


Kay Tee

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Planted the beans for this year in pots, outside in March in the warm but no sign as yet they are going to grow. Is this going to be a year without runner beans?

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Me I am a bit of a gardener, I like to grow veg. But don't laugh it's all in the back garden and the back garden is a town house garden; very small, what was a lawn it's raised beds . My broad beans are taller then me and I have potatoes in very large flowers nearly as tall as me.

Last year we were eating veg out of the garden but this year the bedding plants are not out fully yet as it's been a bad year .

But this morning I stuffed my hand down by the side of the spuds and yes, I have some. I got some up and cooked them but they did not have that 'wow' factor as they should have; maybe the weather has done something as the potato tops are strange. Anything that might do well is spuds everything else is no good.

My wrists are bad and hands are stiff so next year I think it will be mostly spuds I think as they are easy .Some of the soil is virgin to spuds except where I have grown them in my big raised bed .But I will get some chicken pellets in .Got some spuds in bags and some awful looking green house tomatoes growing under a plastic frame . :emoticons-line-dance: Christine :terrific:

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Hi, I am new to this site but I wondered if anyone has used anything that really does work to stop runner beans being eaten before they've had chance to get going.

 

Mine are about 4 inches tall and I keep spraying them with bug spray but no joy; has anyone used washing up liquid and if so does it work?

 

Help please.

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Hi Barneyboy,

 

Welcome to these forums!

 

As mentioned earlier in this thread, I'm really no gardener, but one or two of our members have tried using washing up liquid, with varying degrees of success.

 

It's certainly worth a try!!

 

Kind regards,


Jo Frowde

ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster

ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

ISN Hotline Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Barneyboy,

 

Welcome to Sclero Forums!  I don't even know what a runner bean looks like, not to mention bug spray for them. But, this thread in our Fun & Friendship forum has been so ever-popular that we are beginning to wonder if runner bean gardening is a possible cause or symptom of scleroderma. <Just kidding!>

 

And I'm pretty sure someone around here will eventually come up with an answer for you, as well.

 

:emoticons-group-hug:


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Shelley,

 

Just for your interest and edification, Runner beans are the flat string beans that grow up a trellis, have red flowers and are delicious when they are young and tender.   Straight off the vine and cooked quickly they are absolutely scrumptious.    I am sure you know them but not by that name.

 

They are actually easy to grow and crop quite heavily when they get going, but the thing is to get to them ahead of the greeblies who love them too.   Insecticides will help but we need to look after the bees too so I for one prefer to try to grow them without nasty sprays.

 

Maybe one day somebody will come up with something easy.   That would be :terrific:

 

Judyt

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