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Annie20

Ulcer and Calcinosis

26 posts in this topic

Hi Annie,

 

About the doggies: They are my doxie Sadie, with her best friend Jasmine, a small spaniel mix.

 

Craig

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Hi Craig,

 

I love the names you chose for your doggies.

 

This is quite interesting.....talked to my hand surgeon and he recommended botox! I was shocked! I thought botox was only used for cosmetic such as wrinkles. He did explain the main purpose--to increase blood circulation in both hands, especially the right hand where the ulcer & calcinosis is, (index finger). In the office he did an ultrasound of both hands, could not hear a few of the arteries in right hand and did not hear one artery in left hand. He felt surgery is out of the question because the calcinosis will return. It never occurred to me it would. His quote, "it's your best alternative."

 

First step is to have a vascular study which is scheduled this Thursday in the a.m. (takes 2 hours.) I'm hoping I'll be elgible to have the botox done. The surgeon will meet my husband & myself beginning of July to discuss the results of study. Please keep your fingers crossed.

 

I am delighted that the surgeon is taking a course of action and will be able to help me. I do not want to lose my finger.

 

Wondering if anyone on this forum did botox?

 

Thank you all for your advice, support and encouragement. :emoticons-thankyou:

 

Annie


Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis, (Scleroderma). Lung, skin and gastrointestinal involvement.

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Hi Annie,

 

You poor thing, I understand how you feel. I had the mother of all calcinoses on my finger. When the rheumatologist saw the xray, she actually gasped and grabbed the table. The pain was as you describe and believe me, the terror of having that finger bumped or injured far outweighed any temporary pain I might feel. In fact I had no fear at all of pain knowing that daily pain would be gone.

 

I strongly, and I mean STRONGLY suggest you see a hand surgeon, and one who is familiar with this very rare and strange manifestation. Board certified only.

 

Personally if you've been living with this pain day in and day out, you're understandably agitated about more pain. From someone who has been there, you can do this. Message me if you need support.

 

Have it done with now but it is true, it may return. But the consequences of it getting much larger are even worse. Please take action early.

 

Be well,

 

Mary


Diffuse sclero; diabetes; hypertension; GERD with Barrett's

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Hi Annie

 

I have had about 15 operations for calcium deposits and that is the only thing that has ever helped me with them. More than likely hon you had the calcium deposit first that caused the ulcer.

 

Doctors give us antibiotics for everything it seems. Antibiotics are for infection and that is all the antibiotic will help you with. They will not heal the ulcer or make the calcium go away. It is important that you take it to ward off infection, you're in enough pain, you sure don't need an infection also.

 

If you have surgery trust me when I say that you don't want to feel anything,an ulcer is horrid pain. If you get that calcium cut out then in time the ulcer will heal but the calcium being there will keep the ulcer from healing. So if I were you I would go the route that will be as painless as possible for you. I wish you all the best hon....Hugs

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Hi Mary and Catty,

 

Thank you both for your replies and your experiences with ulcers and calcinosis. :thank-you-2:

 

Mary - I am currently seeing a board certified plastic and hand surgeon. You would not believe this, but he suggested botox on both hands to improve blood circulation. Initially I honestly thought he was joking. He first recommended a vascular study which took a little more than an hour. This test, (study) will determine if I'd be elgible for botox. My husband and I will be discussing the results with him on July 5. On July 7, we'll be seeing my rheumatologist. (yearly visit). Husband is somewhat concerned about the botox so he would like to see what her (rheumatologist) thoughts are. It'll be interesting to see if they're on the same page.

 

Catty - My internist had prescribed antibiotics, dosage was 3 times per day. It cleared the infection. In fact, great news, the calcinosis on my finger is developing new skin. When the calcinosis developed 3 months ago, it was a bump for the longest time which increased in size, then after taking antibiotics it turned into a scab, eventually it dried up and the scab fell off by itself.

 

I will post after talking to my hand surgeon to see what direction I go towards.

 

Take care and hugs to both :emoticon-hug:

 

Annie


Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis, (Scleroderma). Lung, skin and gastrointestinal involvement.

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Annie...you should always take antibiotics if you have an infection. I just wanted you to know that every time you get an ulcer it is not automatically infected but the skin is open so you have to be so careful to keep it from getting infected (like keeping it covered with a bandaid and keep it very clean).

 

I have never had a calcium deposit go away on it's own myself. Yes the skin can heal up over it again but the deposit is still there unless you had it removed or it came up so close to the surface that you could actually roll it out yourself. Calcium deposits can cause ulcers and infections also. Good luck hon!

 

Catty

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Hi Catty,

 

You're so right about keeping it clean and being on antibiotics. Unfortunately, yes I have new skin developing where the calcinosis is, but I see one developing again. :crying:

 

Thank you for responding. :thank-you:

 

:emoticon-hug:

 

Annie


Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis, (Scleroderma). Lung, skin and gastrointestinal involvement.

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Annie,

 

I just wanted to add my two cents in.

I recently had surgery on my right hand to remove extensive and huge calcinosis from 4 fingers, on top of it I had the nerve sympathectomy. It was worth going under for me, because it was a 5 hour surgery. Even then, the doctor was not able to remove all the calcinosis but the pain has eased quite a bit.

 

September I will do my left hand.

 

Now I have one on my foot that has returned. Initially I had this done at the doctors office, lidocaine injection and she just cut away at the area.

 

If it's just one, and it's not on an area where it can damage the motion of your hand then just get it done at the doctors office. If it's extensive, big, or can damage nerves or tendons, please just have the surgery and the occupational therapy after.

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Hi Omaeva,

 

Thank you for your response.

 

I asked the hand surgeon if I could do the surgery route and he felt it would be a waste of money and time because the calcinosis would return. He was very against it and recommended doing botox in each hands to increase blood flow. I need to see if I'd be eligible for botox and will know tomorrow when I see the hand surgeon to discuss the vascular study which took a little more than an hour. I had the study done a couple weeks ago. I also would like to discuss this with my rheumatologist. whom I will be seeing Thursday, (yearly routine checkup) of this week to get her input. And my husband has questions for the hand surgeon about going the botox way.

 

Wow! You sure had your fair share of calcinosis. I cannot imagine if I had more than one. This is the first one I've experience since I was diagnosed which was in 1998. Why do I have problems with them now? hmmmm? I've had ulcers on most of the knuckles on both hands, and one is giving me grief which is the same finger that has the calcinosis on.

 

I will keep you posted as to what the hand surgeon and my rheumatologist. say. Take care

 

:happy-day:

 

Annie


Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis, (Scleroderma). Lung, skin and gastrointestinal involvement.

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Hi Annie,

 

I shall be thinking of you today and Thursday and hope you get a good result from your hand surgeon and rheumatologist.

 

:emoticons-group-hug:


Jo Frowde

ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster

ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

ISN Hotline Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Jo,

 

Thank you very much for thinking of me. :thank-you:

 

Annie


Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis, (Scleroderma). Lung, skin and gastrointestinal involvement.

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