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miocean

HELP for the physically limited in the kitchen

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Somehow I have missed this post for a while...I have the best cook in the world for a husband and we could open a kitchen supply store with what we have. I still don't know what some of the things are in the refrigerator and pantry . We make a great team, he cooks and I do the decorating, table setting and ambiance when we do entertain, something we are getting back to.

 

Right now he is making homemade pizza with dough he started this morning while I am doing nothing. :yes: It tastes delicious, is a thin crust, crispy pizza that is so light you can practically see through it. Dinner anyone?

 

 

 

I am happy to report that during my recent baking extravaganza, two different kinds of cookies and two batches of brownie in 3 days I noticed a BIG improvement in handling the pans and bowls. Having a good stand mixer really helps. These were all to give away to the lifeguards and people who I know from the beach although I made the mistake of keeping some and eating them all. :blush:

 

I think the improvement in my hands is from actively using them more and the skin not being as tight.

 

Teatime, we (he) don't (doesn't) cook much in the summer either. We don't have quite as high as temps as Texas (my sister lives there so I know) but it gets into triple digits with awful humidity. My husband has been able to do great things with rotisserie chickens from the market.

 

miocean


ISN Artist

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Does that invitation to dinner still stand, Miocean?.......I'd love to accept!!( Slight problem of being in a different country, though!! ;) :lol: )

 

I'm so pleased to hear that you're experiencing an improvement in your handling of the bowls and pans; I'm sure you're right about using your hands and keeping them mobile.

 

........I still don't know what some of the things are in the refrigerator and pantry........

 

Every so often I have a clear out of the cupboards in the kitchen; I do hate to throw things away, but I think even I should draw the line at keeping tins with "best before Sept.1998" stamped on them!!! :rolleyes: :lol:

 

Kind regards,


Jo Frowde

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Miocean, I love homemade cookies, ones with chocolate (milk, dark, white, I don't discriminate) chunks in are my favourite. At a previous Scleroderma Society local group meeting, a lovely lady brought some homemade cookies with chocolate chunks in them. Now I ate nearly all of them, really, I was a poor host as I ate one after the other after the other but I just didn't care! They were soft and chewy and filled with chocolate!

 

Jo, Michael hates to throw anything away and thinks that if it's in the fridge it can survive for many, many months. Well, no, not really and bread will have gone green and moldy before he gets round to throwing it out. He doesn't get that if air gets to it, it will go stale! I just quietly throw things away and he never notices. There's always some form of stale, baked goods to be binned and something soft and green to be cleared outta the fridge! He does make me laugh!

 

Take care.


Amanda Thorpe

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My not knowing what is in the pantry and fridge it is a little different as there are all kinds of exotic sauces (especially hot ones) and spices. For instance, we have at least 3 different kinds of cinnamon and asian sauces. My husband is definitely a foodie, reads cookbooks like others read novels. I finally got him to label the spices which he puts in special jars as I do not know the oregano from basil.

 

We are very careful about expiration dates and my husband will call the number on cans/bottles/jars if he has any questions.

 

Since I don't cook and only do occasional baking, I can play dumb and get wonderful meals cooked for me!

 

The seagulls eat well when we clean out the fridge. There were a couple of times we brought home restaurant meals that were inedible and even the gulls wouldn't eat them!

 

miocean


ISN Artist

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Hi Miocean,

 

Back in this thread a bit, you mentioned, "It is very difficult for me to lift a pot off the stove, especially if is full. Any suggestions for that?"

 

Yes. For example, for boiled vegetables, get a small-mesh strainer that fits within the pot, and that has handles. Then instead of picking up the entire pot, only lift the (cooked) items out with the strainer, and into a nearby bowl. Then let someone else deal with the pot of water, later on -- unless you are home alone, in which case, scoop out the remaining water with a ladle, until the pot is light enough to safely lift.

 

Also, I cook a lot of meals in our (very fancy) rice cooker, including old fashioned oatmeal, beans, and soups. When things are done cooking there is a handy "Warm" button which will keep things warm but not overcooked, for a long time. Plus, the bowl is lightweight and has handles on both sides, making it easier to lift/carry than most stove pots.


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

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Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Shelley,

Those are great suggestions! Usually I do not do the cooking and my husband takes care of those pots (I am so spoiled) but I have started baking again and was having difficulty with getting cake batter out of the bowl and putting pans in and out of the oven. Your ladle idea would work well for the cake batter.

 

Strangely and happily, my hands are much better, even since the start of this thread. Five years of Occupational Therapy kept them from totally curving into fists and today my fingers have a slight curvature and do not straighten. Then, with my skin softening I have more flexibility. This has all enabled me to use my hands more, and the combination of all of those things has made it possible for me to do things now I could not do previously.

 

So today I am doing the happy dance!

 

:emoticons-line-dance:

 

miocean


ISN Artist

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