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Raynaud's and warm or cold weather

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Hi, everybody,

I live in a very warm and humid city, at least 30º C all the year.

 

Last week I travelled to a colder city, it was autumn there (in my city we don't really have seasons) and it was about 20 to 30º C; I felt great! There people don't use air conditioners and the temperature is constant inside and outside places.

I don't feel weird wearing more clothes in cold weather.

 

Raynauds and digital ulcers are very painful and since they came into my life, I had discarded my plans to move to a colder city, but now I'm wondering what is the best thing to do.

 

Please, tell me your experiences with Raynauds and the weather.

 

Hugs to all.

Ro

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Hi Ro,

 

Those of us who live in more temperate climates imagine that living in a tropical city would be blissful, but having lived in Cape Town, South Africa where they have very warm summers, I know it is just as difficult as colder places. The north east coast of Australia, where we often go on holiday is tropical too. Lovely outdoors but not when you go indoors.

 

I used to think that 20degrees average would be perfect and I still think that. I understand what you mean about the heat and air conditioning and in fact that still applies even in slightly cooler cities. Supermarkets need to keep cool in parts and I still never go shopping without a warm jacket but one doesn't feel quite as eccentric when you turn up with jacket and gloves when you live in a cooler place.

 

Here in Auckland New Zealand our summer days are somewhere in the 20 to 25 range with the occasional 28 and except for shopping days I find that quite comfortable. Our winter is different though, varying from 10 to 18 with colder nights, but once again lots of people wrap up warmly so I am not so obvious.

 

Keeping your trunk warm is the vital thing I find so our fashions of layering with warm garments close to the skin and more decorative ones on top are ideal.

 

A more even climate is definitely easier to live with.

 

Best wishes

 

JudyT


Judy Trewartha

(Retired) ISN Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Ro

 

Well that's a hard one for me to answer because I can have an episode actually just walking from one room to another. I agree with the others, air conditioning also has its draw backs. I have episodes while changing as well as while showering if the water is too hot, there's no winning here. Any shift in temperature anywhere seems to find me but I believe the warmer it is, the better it is for me personally as far as my Raynauds goes. Wet, damp weather is also pretty unfavourable. One of my doctors told me I should not be in temperatures lower than 80 degrees...so I have to go with JudyT, a more even climate would be easier to live with.


Sending good wishes your way!

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Hey, Judyt,

Thanks for your reply!

Living in a city whose weather is so warm all the year is uncomfortable because I sweat a lot when I get out of home and when I get into work I feel so cold! People at my work think is very strange somebody using jackets and gloves in my city, and sometimes its very boring to explain why and see them looking me like they're feeling sorry for me.

Yes, we have health problems, but we can be happy and have a relatively normal life.

Hugs,

Ro

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Ro,

I live in the Northeast of the US and we have long winters, and not too hot summers. For me my Raynaud's is kind of bad no matter what the temperature. Any temp. change is hard for me, but like Judyt, the damp rainy weather does more of a toll on me. I am used to the stares and questions when wearing gloves in the summer. Raynauds stinks and I hope that you can find some kind of relief...

Marsha

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Hi Ro,

 

I suffer with Raynaud's and can sympathise; unfortunately the climate in the UK is normally cold and wet, quite often during the summer as well. I say 'normally', because during March and the beginning of April we had a heat wave, so much so that now there's a hosepipe ban in the South where I live. (Mind you, they do seem to scream "Drought!!" at the slightest provocation!! ;) ) However, as I suspected might turn out to be the case, we've just had one of the wettest droughts on record with virtually non stop rain for the last 3 weeks!! :rolleyes: :blink:

 

Judy's quite right about keeping her core temperature warm and like Snowbird I find an attack of Raynaud's can be triggered by air conditioning and as unfortunately happened to me today when I was forced to take a cold shower at the gym when the hot water suddenly gave out in the middle! (I don't do 'invigorating' so was very miffed at the time!! ;) :lol: )

 

I've included a link to Raynaud's Treatments to give you some more ideas and information.

 

Kind regards,


Jo Frowde

ISN Board Member

ISN Secretary of the Board

ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster

ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

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International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Just out of interest does growing older have any impact on the frequency digital of ulcers? The older I get the less I seem to have. Is this an age thing?

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Hi Night owl,

 

I can't really say with any authority that Raynauds changes as one gets older. I am certainly not a researcher or statistician, I barely qualify as a laundry maid these days and I certainly can't cook potatoes without burning them, but I do know that in the last year my Raynauds has almost disappeared. The change is remarkable and I can't put it down to anything else except my great age!! 68, or my combination of medications.

 

My husband asked me this morning if I was cold in bed last night? No, why says me? Well, says he - I was cold and you always complain before I do so I thought you would say you were freezing. Not only wasn't I cold but I was actually very cosy. His response was that when I was in hospital earlier this year they must have reconditioned my valves.

 

I don't know about that, but something is different so I think I have to put it down to age. There is a nasty south wind today (we are in the southern hemisphere) ambient temperature 16 degrees in the shade, and I have been out in what I call summer clothing, so something is going on. Now that I am inside again and it is 22.6 degrees I have put on a woolly jumper - explain that!! Maybe the Raynauds is on the wane but the contrariness of my response doesn't seem any different.

 

Personally, I haven't had any digital ulcers for years and I was putting it down to medication - who knows!!

 

Good luck with the improvement,

Warm hugs and best wishes

JudyT


Judy Trewartha

(Retired) ISN Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Ladies!

 

When it comes to Raynauds, it's "interesting" how each of us responds to cooler/warmer temperatures!

It wouldn't be "unusual" for me to don shorts and a tank top and yet have gloves on my hands and lined boots on my feet!

My circulation just can't seem to get straightened out, even though another blood pressure medication has been added to

my "medication arsenol". My feet actually don't FEEL cold, but to touch, they can be like ice cubes! YIKES! I only know that

it's important to keep our extremities warm.

 

Ro, I just wanted to say that it was so great that you were able to come to chat, last night! :emoticons-clap: I really enjoyed being able to

"meet" you! :emoticons-yes: I'm looking forward to our future chats together! :)

Along with Tuesday, there are also chats on Sundays, Wednesdays and I host one on Fridays, also; if you refer to the 'Chats', you can find the times of each!

 

night owl, if you are able to join in on any of the chats, you are always welcome! Any/All members are welcome; it's a great way to "meet" others and to share your concerns about the health issues you deal/cope with.


Special Hugs,

 

Susie Kraft

ISN Support Specialist

ISN Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hello Night Owl

 

My understanding is that Raynaud's can worsen over time, mine is certainly worse than when first diagnosed although still mild for sure. I also think that our circulation can deteriorate as we age as part of the ageing process, again this is what I understand so don't take it as fact!

 

Take care.


Amanda Thorpe

ISN Sclero Forums Senior Support Specialist

ISN Video Presentations Manager

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(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Assistant Manager

(Retired) ISN Email Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi, everybody!

For me Raynaud's gets worse with cold and emotional stress.

Well, I think I'm dealing better with that by always having gloves and a coat in my bag, even living in an extremely warm city.

I thnik my circulation in the hands woorsened, my fingers are thicker, when I close my hands circulation interrupts.

Love to meet you, Susie! I surely will join the chat every time I can.

Hugs

Ro

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Hi, I am new to this forum. 

 

I was searching "Raynaud's in hot climates" and this popped up.   I myself grew up in a pretty cold country, even summers were not warm enough for me.  I found it so unenjoyable and winters were a misery, especially when my children did winter sports!  We then moved for work to a very hot humid tropical climate 8 years ago and although I do actually find it too hot the Raynaud's has been pretty non-existent unless I visit home again! 

 

But I now have noticed a huge change.  All of a sudden after giving up smoking I have the opposite problem.  My feet and legs are constantly hot and swell up when the weather is very warm and humid.  My husband is usually the one with hot feet but now it's me!  I crave to be in the cool as the swelling disappears.  So weird, it's like Raynaud's in reverse now. 

 

I never would have thought I would want to live in a cold climate again!  

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In the southern UK, temperatures are in the 20s celcius in the summer and can range from minus ten to plus ten in the winter.

 

I find that I can gradually get used to the cooler temperatures, but sudden drops really affect my Raynaud's.  Even in the summer, it may be 20 degrees, but if the temperature drops because of a passing cloud, it usually sets mine off.

 

Wind can be another factor in my experience, but the worst is walking around supermarkets.

 

I know that smoking is not helping, but very difficult to give up a 40 year ingrained habit.

 

I also get what feels like Raynaud's in my eyes and facial skin, but my general practitioner thinks I'm imagining it.

 

I also have as many problems with the heat as the cold. I believe it is due to the fact that our blood vessels cannot properly dilate and contract in either situation.

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Hi Steff,

 

Welcome to these forums!

 

Please bear in mind that I'm not a doctor (my medical knowledge consists of an out of date first aid certificate), but I would hazard a guess that it's possible that giving up smoking might have caused this rapid change to your Raynaud's. Giving up smoking would improve your circulation and thus the blood flow to your fingers, helping with the Raynaud's symptoms. I've included a link to our medical pages on Raynaud's, which I hope you'll find helpful and informative.

 

However, if your symptoms are concerning you, I would suggest that you make an appointment with your doctor to discuss this with him.

 

Kind regards,

 

 


Jo Frowde

ISN Board Member

ISN Secretary of the Board

ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster

ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

ISN Hotline Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Steff,

 

Welcome to Sclero Forums! 

 

Congratulations on quitting smoking, that is one of the very best possible things you can do to improve your odds of living longer and better with scleroderma.  I know what a truly major achievement it is to quit smoking (I rate it as the hardest thing I've ever done in my life), so I'm throwing my own Sclero Happy Dance for you! :happy-dance-line::happy-dance-birds::happy-dance-line:

 

Please see your doctor about your leg swelling. There are two different types of edema (swelling): pitting and nonpitting.  Pitting means if you poke the swollen part with your finger, it stays indented.  With nonpitting, it just pops straight back again.

 

Pitting edema can be caused by things like heart disease; nonpitting is often caused by lymphedema. Your doctor can figure out which type you have and with any luck devise a way to deal with it.  Also, be sure to review your medications.  (I swell up like a balloon on Norvasc, and even ibuprofen.)

 

Please let us know what you find out from your doctor, too.

 

:hug-group:


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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