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Dee L

Oral Specialists

31 posts in this topic

Hello Quiltfairy

 

I have started to have dental problems because of scleroderma, dry mouth. An incompetent dentist didn't help! It's very frustrating because it's another thing we have to take on the chin, or jaw, from scleroderma. Having always had perfect teeth it's somewhat galling.

 

I am glad you are pleased with your dentures and still able to eat. My husband has them and complains about not being able to taste food? Do you find this?

 

Take care.


Amanda Thorpe

ISN Sclero Forums Senior Support Specialist

ISN Video Presentations Manager

ISN Blogger

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Assistant Manager

(Retired) ISN Email Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Yes, I did find it affected my taste at first but it has come back. I have had my dentures since 2010; my only problem as of late they are not fitting as good as they used to, so I need to go to my dentist and get them adjusted so they fit once again. It seems my lower jaw bone is getting smaller, so the dentures go down too far.

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Thanks quiltfairy! Can they adjust the denture or do they have to make you another bottom set/another top and bottom set?

 

Take care.


Amanda Thorpe

ISN Sclero Forums Senior Support Specialist

ISN Video Presentations Manager

ISN Blogger

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Assistant Manager

(Retired) ISN Email Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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I don't know about the bottoms, but I am sure that they will have to make a new top as my mouth is getting smaller, as this is one of the things we put up with Scleroderma and the top is getting quite tight and starting to cause some pain from pressure. The false teeth are much better than the pain I was having all the time, also a tooth would periodically fall out.

 

At that time I did not know I had scleroderma, but the sclero doctor thinks I have had it for about ten years so that may have been why it was happening.

 

I have started using Biotene moisturizing mouth spray for the dry mouth; it is really helping with the dry mouth and I like using it right before I go to sleep. My mouth does not get as dry at night.

 

I have also heard about implants; I am going to ask my dentist about them. With the implants there are no dentures they are just like real teeth; I have a friend that has them and he loves them. He said they were much better than his plates, but I don't know if my insurance will cover them.

 

Good luck on whatever you decide and please let me know. 

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Hi Quitfairy,

 

Sometimes there can be a problem with implants, as some of the medication taken for Scleroderma (ie Alendronic Acid) can cause the jawbone to crumble and therefore implants are not a viable option. Your dentist could probably advise you.

 

In the UK implants are extremely expensive; I have a friend who paid an absolute fortune for about four or five teeth and the procedure for fitting them wasn't that pleasant, either. However, like your friend, mine is very happy with them now they're all in place and she's recovered from the shock of the final bill. ;)

 

Of course, if your insurance will pay for them then that alleviates one problem! ^_^


Jo Frowde

ISN Assistant Webmaster

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ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

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International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Amine,

 

I am sorry your sister is having so many dental problems due to scleroderma. I have had a ton of dental problems including gum diseases and many teeth lost. Several times I've had to go without my partial for weeks on end, waiting for gum inflammation or mouth sores to settle down.  I do know how embarrassing it is -- especially since I am missing nearly all of my upper teeth.

 

I've found that stressing out about it doesn't help, either, because stress increases inflammation. So I joke about it a lot, like calling myself the Toothless Wonder of the Western World.  Of course, it's okay if *I* call myself names, but not so much if others do.

 

With scleroderma, I have personally shied away entirely from bridges or implants. It is much more practical -- and a zillion times cheaper!! -- to get partials and dentures. I love my partial because they can just keep adding teeth to it as need be. And your sister will likely be a fine candidate for a partial when the gums settle down.

 

Meanwhile she should of course make every effort to eliminate anything that might be worsening the inflammation, and remember to also suspect toothpaste and mouth washes.  The more "natural" the better right now, if the dentist approves, such as baking soda for toothpaste and light salt water rinses instead of mouthwash because the slightest thing can make a bad situation worse or prevent the natural course of healing.

 

On the positive side, gums tend to heal very quickly, given the opportunity. So try to reassure her that she is not alone, and that you know someone who has happily braved the public jeers as the Toothless Wonder of the Western World, and that overall, people are quite kind and understanding, especially if you remember to give the world a great big, toothless grin!  Its the frowns or pouting or tears over it that people really don't like.

 

One of the greeters at our local restaurant has fully half his teeth missing -- and has for years -- yet he still smiles as broad as the grand canyon, to the delight of virtually everyone.

 

Keep us posted on how your sister is getting on, will you?  And don't give up hope. Her gums are very likely to improve, and she will totally love her new partials when the time comes.  And, I still often have to go without my partial due to mouth sores, only popping them in to talk on the phone or make a public foray, or to let a pulled tooth heal. It helps to use the "bad hair day" attitude. None of us always look perfect, and often we are even at our most lovable when we look our worst, because we are more human and down to earth then.

 

I'm sending some extra warm hugs for you and your sister.

 

:emoticons-group-hug:


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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