greypilgrim256

Question about AP (Antibiotic Protocol)

3 posts in this topic

Since being diagnosed I have been researching non-stop about this disease and my symptoms.  I've come across a few message boars and resources that describe treating Scleroderma, RA, MCTD, and other autoimmune diseases with antibiotics like minocycline.  Individuals claim to have great success with antibiotic treatment, but most doctors seems to dismiss it as nonsense.  

 

I have also read conflicting NIH studies that both give plausible credit to it and some that say it is unproven.  

 

Has anyone here actually had first hand experience or know of anyone that has treated auto immune conditions with antibiotics like minocycline?  This seems to be a very controversial topic.  Personally, I am very skeptical of many things and it seems too good to be true, but anything to keep the powerful  and toxic immunosuppresants away seems promising.  

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Hi Greypilgrim,

 

We have a medical page on Minocycline and to quote from our page "Warning: Minocycline (doxycycline) treatment has been proven to be ineffective for the treatment of systemic scleroderma by reliable scientific study."

 

There is a lot of information on that page regarding this drug and I've also included another link to Minocycline to give you more information on the side effects, etc. which can be very unpleasant. From the information supplied I understand that Minocycline is no good for Scleroderma and should not be prescribed.

 

Kind regards,


Jo Frowde

ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster

ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

ISN Hotline Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hello Greypilgrim

 

I recently met a woman, newly diagnosed, who had been researching all over the internet and also hit on the antibiotic cure claim. I explained to her, as Jo has you, that it has been debunked. Minocycline can cause disfiguring discolouration of the skin, as in bluish areas, even after short use and they DO NOT go once use stops. People have had to resort to laser treatment to reduce the appearance of the discolouration.

 

Although we fully support investigating scleroderma we don't support surfing the web for the information for this reason, debunked information is everywhere except here. I am glad that, having found the information, you came here to check it out.

 

Take care.


Amanda Thorpe

ISN Sclero Forums Senior Support Specialist

ISN Video Presentations Manager

ISN Blogger

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Assistant Manager

(Retired) ISN Email Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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