Ron

Finger Ulcers

28 posts in this topic

Finger ulcer update:

The ulcer is shaped like an L. It starts at the finger tip and goes around and follows the fingernail half way down.  The tip has scabbed over and no longer painful, the side is still open and painful.  Still on the antibiotic cream, however to me the finger looks like its healing fine.

Lung update,

 

I see the doctor Monday for test results.

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Finger ulcer update, its been 2 months and 3 weeks since I got this nasty finger ulcer. Its 90% healed the help of an antibiotic cream. It worked well, but slow. This was the worst ulcer I have ever had on my fingers.

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Hi Ron,

 

I'm very happy to hear that your finger ulcer is finally on the mend. And I'm eagerly awaiting the post when it's all gone so that we can throw a Sclero Happy Dance. I need the exercise!


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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My finger ulcer has finally completely healed.  It started in April.  Now I have a new one on the same finger, not in the same spot, smaller but still painful.  That ulcer was the worst one I ever had. The relationship with digital ulcers and PAH has been documented, I think I may have PAH.  I had a ECHO and the heart doctor said there was some thickening on the vessels in the right side of the lung and heart.  I hope I don't have to go for a right heart cath.  I dread the use of a bed pan.

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Hi Ron,

 

I've had finger and toe ulcers, without having PAH, so although there is a correlation, and perhaps even a likelihood of PAH in your particular case, given so many other things, it is probably not an automatic shoe-in (which I mention for other people with digital ulcers who perhaps have a fresh worry over pulmonary hypertension).

 

The right heart cath generally isn't as bad as advertised.  Between prep and recovery it can be just a few hours. It just sounds so much worse, and so much scarier, on paper than most people find it in real life.

 

My late husband rated right heart caths as one of his favorites, among the invasive tests, and would even have his without sedation; but he was a crazy fool that way, he would also have his esophagus stretched without sedation and hop right back in the car to go to work again. He loved following the heart cath on the monitor, as its one of those things you can often watch (if you are game for that sort of gory stuff).  He also had very many bronchoscopies with biopsies, and he preferred heart caths over bronchs, so if you've ever had a bronch, you've probably already been through worse than the heart cath, and lived to tell about it.

 

If you're not game for all the show-watching, which anxiety might just understandably toss out of the ball park for you long ahead of time, they do give the really good drugs for this one to really relax you. You will float off into a pleasant little cloud of relaxation, and should awake being able to throw on your street clothes and go home as soon as they give the all-clear.  You'll need to have a driver, and you will have some activity restrictions for the first day or two, so you can plan for an at-home movie fest or chug down a good summer book.

 

If they are coming close to a PAH diagnosis, as I understand it, the right heart cath is really the only truly acceptable way to properly diagnose it, even though there is a constant push to use cheaper tests to diagnose it, they are simply not as accurate.  You might even mostly pass the other tests but flunk the right heart cath -- and vice versa.  You can look bad on the other tests, but be basically okay on the right heart cath.  And bear in mind, you can have plenty of stuff wrong, and have impaired breathing, without having full-scale, in-need-of-treatment PAH.

 

You shouldn't be bed bound for more than an hour or so in recovery, provided everything goes fine, of course. Which it is very likely to, because you are conscientious, and conscientious people overall have better outcomes because they read the instructions and -- oh, dare I say! -- actually follow them.  It's normally the daredevils who mess up in aftercare by doing stupid stuff, and I just don't see you throwing caution to the wind, and getting drunk down at the local bowling alley and scratching your head over why your incision broke open and you don't feel so hot.

 

So, if they eventually get around to doing the procedure, which would seem reasonable, you'll likely do great with it...or at least, a lot greater than the carefree ne'er-do-wells!

 

:hug-group:


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Hi Ron,

 

Your comment about the bed-pan made me smile.   I would say you are unlikely to ever have to use one.

 

I am hopeless with using them and I have had just about every invasive internal exam that it is available and the only time I have had to try using a bed-pan was when I was in HDU with Pneumonia (High Dependency Unit).

 

Don't lose your sense of humour - it will serve you well!!

 

Best wishes

Judyt

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Hi Ron,

 

What would really lift my spirits would be a nice long list of crazy things a person could do with a bedpan. I will donate the idea of decorating them with designer duct tape, perhaps the 70s peace sign version. And arranging an artistic display of them, perhaps spray painted and arranged like daisies, for a urology reception area.

 

Luckily our sense of humor is infectious, and it's also the only organ that cannot be affected by scleroderma.


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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On the old time TV series MASH they took the bed pans and made a fountain out of them.

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