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Ron

Teeth and Scleroderma

9 posts in this topic

I have an eye tooth that has been giving me problems for a couple years.  The dentist has only seen about 5 of these in his career.

He said my body is attacking the root of the tooth, rotting it.  He may have to pull the tooth at some point as there is no way to fix it or prevent it from getting worse.

Has anyone here heard of such a thing?  Do you think it's related to Scleroderma?  I know Amanda will think it's related. :wink:

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Hi Ron,

 

Unfortunately, it's possible that your dental problems could be related to Scleroderma and I've included links to our medical pages on Scleroderma Dental Involvement and Periodontal Disease. 

 

I have known fellow Scleroderma sufferers who've had terrible problems with teeth becoming loose and eventually falling out; I've had quite a few pulled in my time, but wouldn't like to say whether it's due to Scleroderma or not.

 

Kind regards,


Jo Frowde

ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster

ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

ISN Hotline Support Specialist

ISN Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Ron,

 

Our elaborate dental involvement pages are largely compliments of my own dental issues. Bone resorption of the mandible  is probably what you are referring to. I've had a number of teeth affected by that and along with microstomia (mouth getting smaller), my old dental hospital called it "classic textbook scleroderma dental involvement" decades ago.

 

Generally speaking though, you are extremely unlikely to find any dentist with even minimal awareness of scleroderma mouth involvement. Therefore, I recommend you print off any relevant dental involvement pages on our site and take them along to your appointment.

 

:hug-group:


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Thanks Jo and Shelley, if it's not one thing it's another. I wish it was a molar, because no one will see it missing. The day it's removed I will have a black hole in my smile, and I can't afford a false tooth.

 

I will print that page out and give it to my dentist.

 

Ron

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Hi Ron,

I'm sorry to hear about your dental situation. I guess to my being vain it's one of the issues I'm most afraid of. I go to the dentist every 3-4 months for check ups and exams. (today as a matter of fact!) I have a very dry mouth, (of course there is a name for this, but I'm deep in brain fog this morning so can't think of it.) so my dentist watches me closely. 

 

I do hope you are able to keep your tooth in tact my friend. 


Warm and gentle hugs,

 

Pamela

ISN Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Ron,

 

Dentists are likely to give you prices for implants or bridges, and perhaps not quite mention less expensive alternatives, such as flippers.  I have a flipper, which is also known as a partial. They are particularly wonderful with scleroderma because when you lose more teeth, you can simply have them added to your existing flipper, for cheap.

 

Odds are your dentist will discourage it, extolling the many virtues of the far more expensive options, but I've been tickled pink with my flipper for several decades.  I even had them specially made without any tooth rests (because a tooth rest yanked out an adjacent tooth, yes, I'd probably have lost it anyway, but I'm happier not taking that risk, thank you.) 

 

They will probably tell you that you'll need to take them out to eat, which to  me defeats half of the purpose, but I am able to chow on steak and corn on the cob and everything with no problem, and certainly no breakage.

 

Even cheaper but definitely not a long term solution are temporary teeth or even extremely cheap "instant teeth" (neither of which I can vouch for, as I haven't tried or used them).

 

The problem with missing but unreplaced teeth, that I've discovered, is that 75% of my perceived intelligence and 90% of my perceived sexiness escapes through the air tunnel created by a visible missing tooth, and I really don't have the wiggle room to overcome either loss.

 

Another thing your dentist very likely won't tell you is that there are such things as "dental discount plans", which are not the same as dental insurance (which usually put a very low cap on total annual coverage, but strangely most of the discount plans, which are lots cheaper, don't put caps), that you can get for probably as cheap as $10/month in the U.S., no qualifying and no waiting and no ongoing commitment necessary, that typically give about 50% off all dental prices. I even had one dentist that wasn't a provider for my plan but agreed to match the discount prices so that I'd stay with them. My plan also functions as a discount prescription card if you have prescriptions that aren't covered by a prescription plan.

 

In short, don't assume that you are entirely out of options, yet, as you join our special scleroderma toothless wonder of the western world club!

 

:hug-group:


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Thank you Shelley, really good advice!!

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So sorry, Ron, I just read this thread! I did laugh as you're absolutely right, I'm all about blaming everything on scleroderma. In this case though I think it really is caused by scleroderma and it will surely make it all the more complicated!

 

I too lost a tooth to scleroderma, not directly but nevertheless it counts! It broke off bit by bit as I started using my teeth to open bottle tops, I have sclerodactyly so can't use my hands (see the scleroderma!) and paid the price with the loss of the tooth. I paid to have a crown inserted which worked its way out after a few weeks and I never bothered to replace the wretched thing. Mind you, it's not right at the front so I can get away with it, it seems your gap will be visible.

 

I know many people with scleroderma who have all sorts of dental issues, like yourself they have had the disease for decades. I don't think there's much anyone can do to prevent a lot of scleroderma dental involvement apart from practice good dental hygiene, have regular check ups and so forth. This will certainly help problems caused by dry mouth, microstomia but I don't think there's much to prevent bone resorption.

 

I hope you find a solution and take care.


Amanda Thorpe

ISN Sclero Forums Senior Support Specialist

ISN Video Presentations Manager

ISN Blogger

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Assistant Manager

(Retired) ISN Email Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Ron, Its not very nice having loose teeth!

 

I fully understand because my front teeth have become loose and it is one thing I do worry about. I do see the dentist on a regular basis and he thought mine was due to having Scleroderma & a dry mouth but until they drop out I am being very careful (because I'd rather have my own front teeth) about eating certain foods which are hard to bite into such as apples. To eat them I carefully cut them into small bitesize pieces which makes life easier.

 

Buttons

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