Jean S

Social Security Disability for Scleroderma

9 posts in this topic

Does anyone know if SSI is considered for Scleroderma in Massachusetts? Just wondering, as my symptoms progress and with the work I do, I'm not sure I would be capable of doing it anymore. Would appreciate any feedback or if you have any knowledge of this.

 

Thanks!

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Hi Jean,

 

So sorry that I can't help you with a specific query about SSI in Massachusetts, as I'm in the UK and we have a totally different system here.

 

However, I've included a link to our Disability Benefits page and hopefully some of our other members will be along with more specific help and advice for you.

 

Kind regards,

 

 


Jo Frowde

ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster

ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

ISN Hotline Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Jean,

 

Anyone who is thinking they may not be able to continue working full time should consult a disability lawyer immediately, before letting their employer know or making any other work arrangements (like working fewer hours, working

from home, taking a less demanding job, etc.)

 

Initial consultation with a social security disability lawyer is always free.  If they take your case on, they take a percentage of your first Social Security disability check (and none after that. The percentage is set by law.)

 

Systemic scleroderma is a listed disabling condition, however, the applicant must prove that they meet the medical requirements (as well as having enough current credits in the Social Security system). See Scleroderma and Social Security for more info.

 

Please make an appointment with a disability lawyer right away. Many people make the mistake of worrying that they might be jumping the gun, or just hope that things will somehow magically improve.  But people facing possible disability are at a tremendous disadvantage in every way, and it is impossible to plan too soon, or too well, for such an eventuality.  For example, it can take months -- and even years in some jurisdictions -- to receive claim approval (or denial).  And even after approval of disability, it is still nearly a two year wait (from time of initial disability, as established by Social Security) for Medicare benefits to kick in.

 

Also, many people wish they had never let their employer get a whiff of their illness beforehand. Although there are some protections under the Americans with Disabilities Act, there are a great many exceptions which can work to the detriment of a sick employee.

 

:hug-group:


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Thanks Shelley,

 

I spoke to a disability attorney briefly on the phone but because I am still working, they said they couldn't help until I leave my job. I'm concerned if I leave my job I will either get denied disability or it will take forever. I cannot afford to be without a check for a long period of time. My job is highly stressful, requires long hours, I spend a lot of time working on a computer typing (which with my swollen and painful fingers are getting harder), running around from office to office and driving to and from meetings. Recently my muscles have been getting/feeling weak, I'm exhausted and get winded easily. So, I am already feeling the affects from pushing myself everyday.

 

I just don't know how much longer I can stay in this position, and it's what I've been doing for the last 20 years of my career.

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Hi Jean,

 

Then call another disability attorney. If you quit your job, they are just going to complain that you should have called them first. So, keep calling until you find someone who actually cares and isn't just out to make a fast buck.

 

You are right to wonder how much longer you can hold out, and you really need to know all of your rights and responsibilities before that day arrives.

 

:hug-group:


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Thank you Shelley,

I appreciate your support and information! 

I will keep calling until I find an attorney who will meet with me first.

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 I have been on disability since 2010; it took a long time to get it. I first filed in 2007 and I had a attorney throughout the whole process.

 

You will probably be turned down the first time. I was not diagnosed with scleroderma till a year after I got my disability. I was injured at work; I suffered a closed head injury, broken nose and I broke my neck. With the injuries I had, I lost a lot of memories and still have short term memory loss. My doctors are not sure, but it could have caused the scleroderma. I have systemic diffuse scleroderma.

 

According to the disability rules you have to quit your job for at least six months and have all your doctors write a statement about your illness and why you will not be able to work. They will also want a prognosis for how long you will not be able to return to work.

 

The big thing for me is that I got a large settlement from work men's compensation so I bought a house and laid cash down for my house, so it took care of the money. If you have more than $2000 in the bank that will count against you. Start to keep track of every dime you spend by keeping the receipts. I had no problem with that one as I was a truck driver and I had to keep everything if I wanted reimbursement.

 

I am sending you my blessings and hope that everything works out for you.

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Hi, I applied and was denied 3 times in NY. Hired disability advocates and they won big for me.

 

Scleroderma is a compassionate disease but I think becoming more common. Good luck and chart everything from day one of onset. The more facts you have the quicker your claim will get through.

~Carrie


CarriePan :fairy:

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The fact is that nobody who makes the assessments has any idea what Scleroderma is or how it ravages the body.  That's why it's so difficult to get any help.

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