NancyG

Morphea

6 posts in this topic

I woke up at age 13 with brownish spots on many area of the left side of my body only. It never went away, and 3 years later my mom finally took me to the doctor's office. They did a punch biopsy, diagnosed me with morphea, said nothing could be done, and sent me on my way. 31 years later, I still have it. Nothing has changed. I have never gotten used to it.

 

Has anybody else had a presentation like this? I mean these lesions stop dead at the midline of my body. It's weird. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Nancy,

 

Welcome to these Forums!

 

I'm sorry to hear that you've been suffering with Morphea and I've included a link to our medical page to give you more information.

 

There are more serious forms of morphea, although having suffered with this condition for the last 31 years, I would imagine that it should be fairly stable by now and possibly unlikely to deteriorate any further (although anything is possible with such a complex disease as scleroderma! :wink:)

 

UVA1 phototherapy is now the recommended first-line treatment for morphea and so I would therefore recommend that you consult a listed scleroderma expert/dermatologist to determine whether this treatment would be applicable to you.

 

Kind regards,


Jo Frowde

ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster

ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

ISN Hotline Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Nancy,

Just to answer your original query - I was diagnosed with morphea about age 9 and 30 years later the lesions have not dissipated, so you're not alone there. Mine is,  as far as I can tell,  a more classic case in that I have several large lesions on my back and smaller ones on my arms, legs,  and torso. I still occasionally develop new ones,  defying all the statements about it resolving in 3-5 years. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Monika,

 

Welcome to these forums!

 

As stated in my previous post, anything is possible with scleroderma and unfortunately it has many permutations, which is what tends to make it so complex and difficult to diagnose.

 

Kind regards,

 


Jo Frowde

ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster

ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

ISN Hotline Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can anyone with Morphea answer this for me.  I honestly don't know how uncomfortable it is other than the affect on ones appearance?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now