whirlway

Good News For Once

7 posts in this topic

Just got the results from my latest lab and was stunned by the high white count, 5.8. I can't remember it being this high ever, usually it is between 2 and 3. The lowest it has ever been was 1.3. Something good is going on in this old body of mine for a change. Too bad the high count doesn't make me feel better. :)

~whirlway

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Does anyone know what normal white counts are? The numbers are a bit different here - it seems there is some variation from country to country in the way results are recorded. I always thought a high white count was indicative of infection. Perhaps someone could explain it for me.


Warm wishes,

Jefa

 

Carrie Maddoux

(Retired)ISN Sclero Forums Support Specialist

(Retired)ISN Sclero Forums UK Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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That is great news!!! thanks for letting us know. Sam


Sam

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Jefa ,

 

Normal for adults WBC's is 4.8-10.8 on Gareth's blood sheet.

 

M

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Whirlway,

Congratulations! It looks like your WBC finally made it into the normal range. I hope it stays there.

 

The normal range on my blood test results are similar to Margaret's (4.5 - 11). I did find the following information on one of our reliable links at MedlinePlus.

 

What abnormal results mean

A low number of WBCs is called leukopenia. It may be due to:

 

* Bone marrow failure (for example, due to infection, tumor, or abnormal scarring)

* Collagen-vascular diseases (such as lupus erythematosus)

* Disease of the liver or spleen

* Radiation

 

A high number of WBCs is called leukocytosis. It may be due to:

 

* Anemia

* Infectious diseases

* Inflammatory disease (such as rheumatoid arthritis or allergy)

* Leukemia

* Severe emotional or physical stress

* Tissue damage (for example, burns)

 

These lists are not all inclusive.

 

Based on this information we could all swing either way.

 

Big Hugs,


Janey Willis

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Assistant Webmaster

(Retired) ISN News Director

(Retired) ISN Technical Writer for Training Manuals

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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